Advertisement

http://insurancethoughtleadership.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/bg-h1.png

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

August 22, 2013

California SB 863, A Guide For Building And Monitoring Networks With Intelligence, Part 2

Summary:

Developing and monitoring medical networks requires analytical knowledge and technical skill. Because internal resources are often limited, a practical solution is to outsource to the experts for provider performance analytics and continuous monitoring.

Photo Courtesy of

This is Part 2 of a multi-part series on building and monitoring networks with intelligence. Part 1 can be found here. Part 3 will be published soon.

California has defined how medical networks in Workers' Compensation should be structured and managed. Part 1 of this series described how California's SB 863 LC 4616 (b) (2) and LC 4616 (b)(3) takes medical provider network directives to a new level. The key imperative is, “Every MPN must establish and follow procedures continuously to review the quality of care, performance of medical personnel, utilization of services, facilities, and costs.”

California SB 863
The emphasis on network review is a chief imperative of SB 863, effective January 1, 2013. Many directives in the bill require continuous data monitoring to discover provider and network compliance and non-compliance. Some of the directives that require continuous attention are:

  • Chiropractors are limited to a 24 adjustment maximum [LC 4600(c)].
  • MPN's must have geo-coding of network physicians, updated every four years to insure access requirements are fulfilled.
  • LC 4616 (b)(2) and LC 4616 (b)(3) state every MPN must establish and follow procedures continuously to review quality of care, performance of medical personnel, utilization of services, facilities, and costs.
  • Anyone can complain, initiate an investigation, and petition to suspend or revoke an MPN.
  • Injuries while under unapproved, non-MPN care are no longer compensable!
  • Multiple conditions of escaping the MPN, non-MPN payment, and disputes must be monitored.
  • Home Health Care must be prescribed by an MD or DO.
  • MPN's are approved for four years from date of the most recent application or modification.

Provider Performance Analysis
Medical provider performance must be analyzed and monitored not only for compliance with SB 863, but also for acknowledgement of the nuances of Workers' Compensation in the treatment process. Work loss and disability payments, return to work and modified work, claimant legal involvement, along with frequency, duration, and costs of medical services should be analyzed and scored for individual providers, groups, and facilities, whether in California or another jurisdiction.

Provider Data Issue
A problem confronting many organizations is that their medical provider data is insufficient, making accurate analysis impossible. Unfortunately, most provider records in claim systems and bill review systems is severely lacking in quality and comprehensiveness.

Until now, these records were used only to pay bills, consequently, name, address, and FEIN (Tax ID) were adequate. Now, however, because of SB 863 and increased attention to the medical portion of claims nationally, much more information is needed.

Duplicate Records
Most systems contain duplicate provider records. Slight differences in data entry create multiple records for the same provider, each associated with different claims. Under those conditions, provider analysis is inaccurate and incomplete. Such duplicate records must be scrubbed and merged before beginning performance analysis.

Medical Specialty
Medical specialty or specialties should be included in provider records in the data. Those providers certified in a specialty should be compared with others who are similarly certified. Without the provider's specialty, analysis of performance is non-specific and often misleading.

For instance, pain management doctors' performance should be compared to that of other pain management doctors, rather than dermatologists or internists. Pain management physicians often receive cases when they are growing more complex and already costly. Analyzing providers of similar specialties is a matter of comparing “apples to apples.”

Differentiating Individuals
Medical providers who are members of groups or facilities should be analyzed and selected for networks individually even if the group or facility is approved. Some believe all members of a group should be included in the MPN when the group is approved. Actually, individual members might be problematic and automatic approval should not be guaranteed.

Currently many doctors and other providers submit bills under a single Tax ID. Measuring collective performance quality is not acceptable for a network with intelligence. The way to differentiate individuals is to analyze their unique performance using specific identifiers such as the state medical license number or NPI (National Provider Identification).

Networks With ROI
Whether complying with California SB 863 or building Workers' Compensation medical networks anywhere in the country, developing quality networks will return huge savings. Medical providers, especially doctors who score poorly in comprehensive data analysis, drive complexity, high costs, and poor outcomes. Those should be avoided and injured employees should be directed to best in class doctors to receive the best medical care with the best medical and employment outcomes. The business of developing and managing Networks with Intelligence should be given high priority.

First Steps
The first step in building quality medical networks is to scrub and enhance medical provider data in the organization's systems. The next step is selecting best practice providers based on integrated and comprehensive data associated with the claim. Developing and monitoring medical networks requires analytical knowledge and technical skill. Because internal resources are often limited, a practical solution is to outsource to the experts for provider performance analytics and continuous monitoring.

Authors
Karen Wolfe collaborated with Margaret Wagner to write this article. Ms. Wagner is President and CEO of Signature Networks Plus. She is considered an expert in network selection, monitoring and management, thereby creating Networks with Intelligence™ for clients.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!