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February 28, 2016

5 Workers Who May Be Exempt From WC

Summary:

Workers' compensation covers all employees -- but there are at least five groups that may be exempt.

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If you are hurt while working or have an illness caused by conditions at work, you may be entitled to workers’ compensation benefits. Workers’ compensation is a state-run insurance system created to compensate workers for injuries received in the workplace. Employers’ participation is mandatory under state law, and they are protected by the workers’ compensation program from being sued further by the injured employee.

To qualify for workers’ compensation benefits, you must meet the definition of “employee.” Let’s take a look at what that means.

Am I an Employee for Workers’ Compensation Purposes?

Any employee is entitled to receive workers’ compensation benefits. It doesn’t matter how long you have been employed or whether you are working part-time or seasonally. Regardless of these criteria, if you are an employee and injured on the job you will be eligible to receive workers’ compensation benefits.

There can be uncertainty, however, as to what it means to be an employee. By definition, an employee is a person hired for wages or a salary. An employee’s duties are typically dictated or controlled by the employer, and the employee receives any job training needed by the employer.

Independent contractors, freelance workers and consultants, on the other hand, operate more independently and are just required to deliver a job. The manner in which it is completed is not controlled by the company. These workers are not eligible for benefits under workers’ compensation laws.

Special Rules for Certain Workers

In some states, there are some special groups of workers who, although they may meet the definition of an employee, are not required to be covered under an employer’s workers’ compensation insurance. The criteria will vary by state, so it is best to consult with an experienced workers’ compensation attorney if you have doubts. Some of the groups that may be exempt from workers’ compensation coverage are:

Casual Labor – Casual labor is usually defined as work that is not in the usual course of business for the employer. For example, a company may hire someone to do some landscaping or carpentry, which does not directly promote the company’s main business.

Domestic Workers – Domestic workers are paid to help with domestic tasks such as cleaning.

Agricultural and Farm Workers – Agricultural workers perform physical labor and operate machinery on farms, ranches and other agricultural sites under the supervision of farm or ranch managers.

Undocumented Workers – Undocumented workers generally work for cash and are not asked to provide identification or evidence of legal status to the employer.

Leased or Temporary Workers – Leased or temporary workers are employed by a professional employer organization (PEO) and not the company they are working for. They usually work under a contract between the company that needs work and the PEO.

Workers’ compensation insurance is a helpful program to ensure that employees are suitably and promptly compensated for losses incurred when they are injured in the workplace. A person must, however, meet the legal definition of employee in the applicable state. If you have any questions whether you meet that criterion, consult with a workers’ compensation attorney to find out your rights.

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About the Author

Paul Gilbert is a professional blogger and consultant focused on personal injury, workers’ compensation and Social Security disability.

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