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July 11, 2017

Best Practices for Cyber Threats

Summary:

Start by getting cozy with the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s risk management framework from its NIST 800 series.

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All any company decision-maker needs to do is pay heed to the intensifying regulatory environment to understand that network security has become a mission-critical operational issue.

Consider that the Colorado Division of Securities is implementing 90 pages of new rules to clarify what financial “broker-dealers” and investment advisers must do to protect information stored electronically.

That’s on top of the New York State Department of Financial Services enforcing new cybersecurity rules for financial services firms that wish to do business in the Empire State. And, of course, Europe is rolling out new privacy rules known as the General Data Protection Regulation, which will affect more than 4,000 U.S. companies doing business in Europe, including many small and midsize businesses.

See also: How to Anticipate Cyber Surprises  

I recently sat down with Edric Wyatt, security analyst at CyberScout, to discuss the first step any organization — of any size and in any sector — can take to increase its security maturity. His answer: Get cozy with the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s risk management framework set forth in its NIST 800 series of documents. (Full disclosure: CyberScout underwrites ThirdCertainty.) And let’s not overlook looming compliance standards covering data privacy and security, such as the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).

Here are a few takeaways from our discussion:

NIST is foundational. NIST 800 is composed of Uncle Sam’s own computer security policies, procedures and guidelines, which have been widely implemented in the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Defense and most big federal agencies. New York state’s new rules for financial firms incorporate the NIST framework, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, likewise, refers to the NIST framework in guidance for medical device manufactures.

NIST is aggressive. Derived from extensive public and private research, NIST 800 exists as a public service. It lays out cost-effective steps to improve any organization’s digital security posture. Implementation materials are available at no cost to organizations of all types and sizes, small- and medium-sized companies, educational institutions and state and local government agencies.

NIST is flexible. At the end of the day, the NIST series guides organizations to shaping security policies and security controls that are flexible, adaptable — and effective. One vital component is senior management buy-in. New policies can and should be implemented and tweaked in a methodical, measurable manner and should be championed by senior leaders. The goal should not be just tightening security, Wyatt says, but also making one’s organization more reliably productive. A continual feedback loop can help keep controls alive and vital, Wyatt says.

See also: Cyber Challenges Under NIST’s Framework  

This article originally appeared on ThirdCertainty.

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About the Author

Byron Acohido is a business journalist who has been writing about cybersecurity and privacy since 2004, and currently blogs at LastWatchdog.com.

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