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March 15, 2016

Traditional Insurance Is Dying

Summary:

You only have to look at finance, taxis, television and medicine to see what happens to traditional companies that don't innovate.

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Finance. Taxis. Television. Medicine. What do these have in common?

They’re all on the long–and growing–list of industries being turned upside down by disruptive technology. 

The examples are legion. Once-sure-bet investments like taxicab medallions are at risk of going underwater. Bitcoin is giving consumers the power to bypass banks. Traditional television is at risk from online streaming.

Insurance Is No Different

In fact, innovative players have been disrupting the insurance market since before “disruption” was the buzzword it is today. 

Look at Esurance, which in 1999 rode the dot-com wave to success as the first insurance company to operate exclusively online. No forms, no policy mailers–it didn’t even mail paper bills.

By going paperless, Esurance told customers that it was the kind of company that cared about their preferences–and established itself as a unique player in an industry that places a premium on tradition. Insurance isn’t known for being innovative. 

Most insurance leaders operate under the assumption that if it ain’t broke, you shouldn’t fix it. And in a heavily regulated industry, that’s not totally unreasonable. 

But you only have to look at the scrappy start-ups that are taking down long-established players to understand what awaits the companies that aren’t willing to innovate.

Thinking Outside the Box

Take Time Warner–profit fell 7.2% last quarter as industry analysts foretold “the death of TV.” Meanwhile, Netflix’s profits are soaring beyond expectations–even as the risks it takes don’t always pan out. 

Remember the “Marco Polo” series that cost a reported $90 million? Neither does anyone else. But for every “Marco Polo” there’s an “Orange Is the New Black.” Highly successful programs on a subscription model show that Netflix’s willingness to take risks is carrying it past industry juggernauts.

The market is changing–and if you want to stay competitive, you need to use every weapon in your arsenal. Millennials aren’t buying insurance at the rate their parents did

To a consumer population weaned on technology like Uber and Venmo, the insurance industry seems positively antiquated. Facebook can advertise to you the brand of shoes you like–so your insurance company should be able to offer a product that you actually want.

The Information Importance

According to Accenture, “Regulated industries are especially vulnerable” to incumbents. When there are barriers to entry based on licensing requirements or fees, competition is lower. Decreased competition, in turn, leads to less incentive to innovate. This can leave regulated industries, such as insurance, healthcare and finance, in a highly vulnerable position when another company figures out a way to improve their offerings.

Other attributes that can make an industry vulnerable, per Accenture’s findings, can include:

  • Narrow focus: If a brand focuses entirely on cost savings, convenience or innovation, it isn’t effectively covering its bases. A disruptor that manages to offer two or three of these factors instead of just one has a near-immediate advantage.
  • Small scope or targets: Failing to expand offerings to all demographics can mean that industries or service providers aren’t able to replicate the broad reach of disruptors.
  • Failing to innovate: Disruptors don’t always get their product right on the very first try. Companies must innovate continuously and figure out ways to build continuous improvement into their business model.

Tech start-ups use information as an asset. How can you tell if information is a valuable weapon in the battle you’re fighting? 

“Big data” isn’t just a buzzword; industry analysts are calling it the wave of the future. At Citi, they’re talking about “the feed”: a real-time data stream that leverages the Internet of Things to reshape risk management. 

Auto insurers are turning to connected cars to let them reward safe drivers. Some life insurers are even offering discounts to customers who wear activity trackers.

It Can Happen to You

For most insurance companies, incorporating an unknown element into the way they operate is daunting. 

But talk to any cab driver, grocery store clerk or travel agent, and they’ll tell you that the only way to survive in a technology-driven world is to innovate.

Look at the insurance technology market to see what improvements you can incorporate into your organization, and think expansively about how you can use information: for agency management, to attract new customers and retain old ones, to expand your profit margins or to streamline operating costs. 

Your survival depends on it.

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About the Author

Guy Weismantel is the vice president of marketing at Vertafore, the largest provider of insurance software in the industry. With 20 years of marketing and financial leadership in companies such as Microsoft, Business Objects, Baxter HealthCare, Caremark International, and Expedia, his career has focused on bringing differentiated products to market and providing the “compelling reason to purchase” for customers and prospects alike.

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