Tag Archives: XL Innovate

Future of P&C Tech Comes Into Focus

In a 2017 report titled “Drones: Reporting for Work,” Goldman Sachs estimated the addressable market opportunity for drones globally between 2016 and 2020 to be $100 billion, of which the insurance claims drone market was estimated to be $1.4 billion.

And the report did not address the wider opportunities in personal and commercial property insurance: underwriting, pricing, risk prevention, traditional and virtual claims management, fraud detection and product marketing. The report also didn’t cover the use of images from satellites and fixed-wing aircraft, including streaming video.

Whatever the actual size of the total insurance market opportunity, the impact of aerial and drone images in insurance will be enormous.

Industry observers are just beginning to recognize the transformation in property insurance underwriting and claims that is emerging through advanced analytics, artificial intelligence and machine learning tied to neural networks and integrated with data from aerial and drone images.

Property claims investigation costs the industry an average of about 11% of premiums – automated inspection can reduce that expense substantially. And automated property inspection cycle times can average two to three days, compared with 10 to 15 days using traditional methods – lowering costs and increasing customer satisfaction.

Providers will transform the property insurance industry through the convergence of these sources of better images, expanding numbers and types of connected home technologies, customer self-service and aggregated property risk data (historic and real-time).

Follow the money

Venture and private equity investment activity in emerging technologies is a good indicator of potential growth opportunities – these professionals typically engage subject matter experts and conduct deep market research and diligence in a highly disciplined and proven evaluation process prior to investing. Since 2012, almost $2 billion has been invested in more than 370 drone company deals, and the current run rate is more than $500 million in announced deals annually, according to CB Insights research, which states that ”19 of the 24 smart money venture investors have backed at least one drone company since 2012.”

See also: How Technology Drives a ‘New Normal’  

Within just the past two months, four such insurance-related transactions were announced;

  • Nationwide Ventures made an investment in Betterview, a machine learning insurtech startup focused on analyzing data from drones, satellite and other aerial imagery for commercial and residential property insurers and reinsurers. This follows a September 2017 seed round funding of $2 million.
  • DroneDeploy, the world’s largest commercial drone platform, raised $25 million of Series C venture capital, bringing total funding to $56 million.
  • Cape Analytics raised $17 million to grow its AI and aerial imagery platform for insurance companies, led by XL Innovate.
  • Clearlake Capital Group acquired a significant interest in EagleView Technologies alongside Vista Equity Partners, which had purchased EagleView in 2015. (Vista also owns the majority of Solera, parent of property and auto insurance claims services and information providers Enservio and Audatex.)

In 2017, Genpact, a global professional services and insurance claims solutions provider, acquired OnSource, which provides 24/7/365 full service on-demand drone property inspection claims and settlement services across the U.S. Earlier that year, Genpact acquired BrightClaim and National Vendor, providers of integrated claims solutions to the U.S. property insurance market

In 2016, Airware, a global enterprise drone analytics company, closed a Series C round of $30 million to bring its total funding to $110 million. Early in 2016, Verisk Analytics formed the Geomni business unit to specialize in image sourcing and analysis and has since acquired a number of U.S.-based aerial survey companies and their aircraft fleets. Verisk also owns Xactware, the dominant industry provider of property insurance claims solutions and third party products. The Geomni fleet is expected to include more than 125 fixed-wing aircraft and helicopters by the end of 2018, operating from 15 hubs located throughout the U.S. Verisk expects to invest approximately $100 million in Geomni through 2018.

Competition and differentiation

The space has attracted a large number of participants in the past two years, and there are no signs of slowing. Competitors are taking innovative paths to differentiation, including: drone manufacturing, drone operating software for use by field staff and contractors, ground-based roof and wall measurement technologies and full-service, virtual property inspection and property damage reports using drones.

Insurance industry adoption and barriers

The insurance industry’s use of images from satellite and fixed-wing aircraft is fairly well-established, particularly in catastrophe response planning and claims. The North American property/casualty insurance industry has been cautious and conservative in its testing and adoption of drone use for property claims and in using aerial images for underwriting.

Until recently, FAA rules had made it onerous for carriers and industry vendors to obtain licenses and permission to use drones for property inspections. However, after extensive industry lobbying efforts, assisted by more pro-business policies, that obstacle has eased significantly, and several carriers have trained staff and hired contractors to use drones for property claims inspections. Obstacles remain, including restrictions on use near airfield perimeters and outside of operators’ line of sight.

Carriers are split into two roughly equal camps (by market share) on more recently introduced third party services that provide virtual property inspections: those that do not believe that drone image and damage identification technology is sufficiently accurate as yet to manage claims leakage as effectively as their own staff field adjusters – and those that do. Both groups acknowledge that drones are not appropriate for all property claims. Furthermore, customer satisfaction and therefore retention is thought to be higher when insurance company staff visit the property and the homeowner in person.

The future of property insurance

For claims, virtual methods of inspection will include not only drones but claims reporting that involves customers. Claim self-service, including smartphone images and video, which has seen impressive adoption and results in auto claims, is beginning to penetrate property insurance claims, particularly for reporting home interior and exterior wall damage. New, accurate 3D smartphone image measurement technology combined with higher image resolution and the expected expanded availability of much faster 5G wireless broadband will drive adoption.

See also: Secret to Finding Top Technology Talent  

Other methods of property inspection, particularly following extreme wind or hail events and catastrophes, will most certainly incorporate the use of drones, whether operated by insurance staff, managed repair network contractors or third-party inspection services. Also, autonomous drones performing roof inspections not requiring an operator on site may be expected soon.

Finally, on the property underwriting side, we expect high-resolution geospatial image data from multiple sources, artificial intelligence and machine learning to transform that process. Real-time feeds of comprehensive property attributes such as measurements and condition of roofs and other property on the target site will enable instant and more accurate pricing, quoting and binding/renewal of property insurance.

Aerial imagery, mobile technologies, artificial intelligence and computer vision will continue to transform property insurance products and processes, leading to better pricing accuracy, more profitable operations and, above all, better customer experience for policyholders.

6 Minutes of History From 2016

We knew that 2016 would be big.

To capture the flavor of the pace and magnitude of change, I wrote a series of blogs where I likened the dramatic shifts in insurance technology to what happened during the original Italian Renaissance, when education, money, art and science combined to create quantum leaps forward and redefined trade and the economy, the social scene and technological advancement.

So here we are at the end of 2016, and I think we can make a case that 2016 was not only pivotal and groundbreaking but that it was historic on the scale of a Renaissance. At no time in the history of insurance can we find one year that includes this many game-changing events AND a rapid pace of continuing advancement.

My thinking is that if the 525,000 minutes of 2016 were actually historic, then perhaps they deserve their own six-minute look back. To keep things short, I’ve split the 2016 trends into one-minute discussions.

Insurtech — From independent ideas to industry-wide imperatives

Do you remember where you were when you first heard the term “insurtech”? Its first connotations were regarding those out-in-the-stratosphere ideas from independent tech and insurance startups as an extension of fintech regarding important-but-not-disruptive ideas in insurance. You may have heard the term “insurtech” in 2015, but it certainly went mainstream in 2016 as its own vertical focus separate from fintech.

Conversations around insurtech grew, but, more importantly, the influx of capital that advanced the proliferation of startups and greenfields based on new tech capabilities and business model disruption were unprecedented — bringing insurtech from its fintech roots into a completely mainstream, independent, industry-wide wave of innovation. Many traditional insurers and reinsurers hopped on the insurtech wave and showed interest in capturing their own slices of the creative pie. From accelerators like the Silicon Valley Insurance Accelerator (SVIA), Global Insurance Accelerator (GIA) and Plug and Play to the first InsureTech Connect meeting in Las Vegas in October with more than 1,500 executives in attendance, insurtech became the “hottest” thing in the industry, giving insurers of all sizes and lines of business pause to consider their strategies. Even S&P recognized the impact of insurtech as having “a complementary place in the traditional insurance world, despite remaining uncertainty in the industry about how it will function on a wide scale.”

See also: The Insurance Renaissance, Part 5  

The insurance industry may never have had this much activity, excitement and concern on the promise and potential of insurance disruption and reinvention.  From the launch of Lemonade, Slice, Haven Life and more insurers and MGAs, the shift to a customer-centric rather than product-centric view is creating a customer experience not unlike the Amazon experience. 2017 will continue to see existing insurers and reinsurers looking to stand up a new brand and business model to capture the next generation of customers and position for growth.

Emerging technology engages insurers

What emerging technologies are we seeing as having made an impact in 2016 with real operational impact? There is artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning. There are new sensors and their ability to capture the unseen aspects of operation and life. Protective technologies in vehicles, property and health are growing. There is live streaming data and video from smart phones and drones. Data’s organizational and visual capabilities are improving with new tools.

We could drone on.

But the reality is that the mobile, connected and ethereal digital world is using real-time data to gain insight and manage, reduce or eliminate risk in the physical world to a greater degree than ever before. There used to be “an app for that.” Now, there’s a sensor for everything on the Internet of Things. The world is fast becoming an omni-channel portal into daily life. The distance from “emerging technology” to mainstream tech usage is measured in months, not years, shattering Moore’s Law.

Emerging technologies span a diverse realm for insurers — if you consider that new technology can be worn on a wrist, flown pilotless through the sky or operate entirely within the digital networks of processors and servers. It’s no wonder that an insurance renaissance is in full swing. The space age has given way to the digital age, where it seems like anything may be possible — it just takes imagination, creativity and thinking outside the traditional box. Digital technologies have penetrated previously untapped data mines, allowing machine failure to be predicted and prevented; human risk to be captured and calculated; and insurer risk to be managed, mitigated and eliminated, creating a new value proposition, new products and new services for customers.

New and innovative businesses launches

Disruption makes use of plug-and-play ideas and technologies. Traditional insurance organizations were tightly wound balls of string, operating everything within that ball. Connections were immovable. Processes attempted to be neat and tidy, but they were always struggling with the “messiness” of adaptation. Today’s insurtech resembles Legos in insurtech’s ability to fulfill conceptual opportunities. Imagine a pile of sensors, another pile of devices and yet another “pile” of data streams. Then ask yourself, “What can your mind dream up today?” In 2016, businesses were busy dreaming up enough disruptions to disturb the sleeping giants of insurance.

Slice made a mobile app that integrates with a hybrid homeowner/commercial product. Lemonade used an AI bot to act as agent on a peer-to-peer insurance platform. Haven Life (launched in 2015 but entered 33 new states in 2016) reconsidered how data streams could improve the life underwriting experience for term life.  And then there were new distribution options with companies like Ask Kodiak, Insurify and PolicyGenius — to name a few — deconstructing and redefining the insurance value chain/business model.

Just like building with Legos, there seem to be no end to the combinations of startup and greenfield businesses that can launch using new business models, technologies and great ideas across all aspects of the insurance value chain to meet new customer needs, expectations and demands. This is one area where 2017 will certainly trump 2016 — we may only be seeing the beginning of the innovation wave — but expanding from venture-capital-backed to existing insurers standing up their own greenfield and startup businesses.

Reinsurers invest in insurtech and startups

With the reinsurance market having excess capital, reinsurers took big moves to be major players in insurtech — from investing in technology companies to new startup insurance and MGA businesses. In addition, many are looking at all the disruption around and within insurance and developing, incubating and testing new insurance products to take to market, either directly or through customers or partners.

Consider reinsurers’ investment in Trov, Lemonade, Root and Slice; Munich Re’s investment and focus on mobility and autonomous vehicles; or XL Group and the establishment of XL Innovate, a specialized venture capital fund pursuing investments in financial technology, new opportunities for insurance underwriting and related analytics, globally. Swiss Re, Hannover Re, Odyssey Re, Maiden Re and others are rapidly making moves as well.  Consistently, these investments are in new operational models, new products or meeting new risks — creating a path to underserved or new markets.

See also: Insurtech: One More Sign of Renaissance  

As noted in a recent article, all this insurtech activity is raising the expectation on the importance of reinsurance capital to support new business models and back technology startups. In the process, insurtech startups are looking to disrupt the risk to capital value-chain in insurance by deconstructing and collapsing the value chain and by cutting out primary carriers or brokers, as well as costs, and placing the risk directly with reinsurers, leveraging unused capital. We expect to see increased activity from reinsurers that will likely begin to look at partnering with existing insurers/customers to collaborate on new products and with emerging technologies or by standing up a new brand or greenfield, continuing the deconstruction of the traditional insurance value chain.

Cloud goes mainstream

In 2016, the case for core system platform in the cloud reached the tipping point — from a nice-to-have to a must-have. Its logic has grown as capabilities have improved and cost pressures have increased. Though cost is a consideration and modern functionality is important, rapid industry change is fueling a renaissance in insurance models. The startup insurer or the greenfield insurance concept needs a system solution built for rapid deployment. New products often need new processes, making cloud capabilities a catalyst for creative product development. Nothing can make an insurer feel more cutting edge than moving from idea to rollout in the short timeframes that cloud solutions provide.

Many insurers are taking advantage of the same pay-as-you-use principles as consumers themselves. They are sharing system solutions with cloud-based technology. They are paying as they grow, with agreements that allow them to pay per policy or pay based on premiums. They are using data-on-demand relationships for everything from medical evidence to geographic data and credit scoring. They use technology partners and consultants in an effort to not waste time, capital, resources and budgets.

Insurers are rapidly moving to a pay-as-they-use world, building pay-as-they-need insurance enterprises. This is especially true for greenfields and startups, where a large part of the economic equation is an elegant, pay-as-you-grow technology framework. They can turn that framework into a safe testing ground for innovative concepts without the fear of tremendous loss, while having the ability grow if the concepts are wildly successful. The window of opportunity is open to insurers that wish to prepare their business models, products, processes and systems to embrace the pay-as-you-go culture

This makes cloud a nearly-universal solution, fitting the needs of both startups and traditional insurers with plans for growth and expansion. In 2016, cloud became a mainstream option — an imperative for insurers needing a competitive edge.

Perspectives on the Pace of Change

The world recently lost John Glenn, a famous American astronaut and long-time U.S. senator. Glenn was born in 1921, only 18 years after the Wright Brothers tested flights at Kitty Hawk. He lived to pilot jets, was the first person to orbit the earth in a spacecraft, then later flew on two Space Shuttle missions at the age of 77. His life is a great example of the growing pace of change — in a world that moved from mechanization to digitization.

See also: A Renaissance, or Just Upheaval?  

Yet as much as changed in Glenn’s lifetime, today’s advancements are eclipsing all of them in pace and disruption. The systems that create knowledge through data and analysis are truly powerful forces that will ignite perpetual improvement and a new world of connected living. Insurance, once concerned with risk management on a large scale, will be focused on learning and understanding risk down to an individual policy-level, with a craving for more knowledge as it becomes available. If 2016 proved to be an insurance renaissance fueled by insurtech, it is very likely that 2017 will provide us with an even greater shift in the midst of an industry rebirth.

How much will change?

We have all of 2017 to find out!

Lemonade: From Local to Everywhere

In a meticulously planned operation, we filed for a license in 47 states simultaneously. We’ll be revealing the first states in which Lemonade will become available in a couple of months. One thing’s for certain, 2017 is going to be an interesting ride! Stay up to date with news about our progress here

Now that I got this off my chest, I can add some color to why we’re doing this.

Many tech startups go through the famous Local vs. Global debate as they start to plan a market penetration strategy. This dilemma was born with the arrival of modern internet commerce and became even more prevalent with the emergence of SaaS companies that provide global coverage right out of the box.

When you’re selling a digital product, going global may seem like small overhead. Reality is a bit different, though, and, more often than not, small startups that take a bigger bite than they can swallow get into trouble.

When feasible, startups should consider aiming their launch beams at a single city or even a town with population that represents their typical customer.

Here’s why:

1. Know thy users, and design for them

It always amazes me how often startups overlook usability testing during the initial design phase. Having videos of random people playing with your (barely working) mockup is priceless. We learned more in a couple of days of testing than we did in months working in our office.

The cool thing is that you only need about five testers to get value out of a session like that, so there’s really no excuse to not doing it. The smaller the area you launch in, the better the chance of getting valuable data in a user testing session.

We spent hours in WeWork and Starbucks with our early stage, smoke-and-mirrors version of the Lemonade app. We would show it to people, ask for their feedback, ask them some questions and record the entire session. We would then sit in the office and analyze the videos to figure out what worked and what didn’t.

Our early Starbucks user testing sessions allowed us to launch a relatively mature product into the market and achieve faster adoption by our New York customers.

See also: Let’s Make Lemons Out of Lemonade  

2. Budget

Product launches require spending some money. To improve the chances of success, it is recommended to fuel the organic interest generated by social noise and PR efforts with some paid channels. Got a story in TechCrunch? Bloomberg? It will probably die down quicker than you think.

A nice trick is to use content recommendation tools like Outbrain and Taboola to promote content to users who may be interested in it. Google Ads are another obvious choice. Choosing the right outlets is one thing, but there’s a huge difference in costs between a global campaign and a local one.

This becomes much more dramatic when your company requires additional resources to operate in each region like Groupon and Uber. Lemonade recently closed its third round of financing ($60 million in one year of operation) from top VCs such as Google Ventures, General Catalyst, Thrive, Sequoia, Aleph and XL Innovate. We’re going to use this money to drive our expansion throughout the country and activate specific markets the way we did in New York.

3. Surgical use of media coverage

Getting great media coverage takes a lot of attention and time. Whether you can afford an agency or not, you’ll have to choose your battles well. Launching in a specific city allows you to focus on the outlets that are most relevant and will simplify your pitch to journalists.

If you’re creating something exclusive for a certain region, reporters who cover that region usually have a hunger for tech stuff that is happening, or launching in their hometown before everywhere else. BTW, there’s a case for launching in unexpected places like Portland or Philadelphia, which usually don’t get much attention from the tech and consumer industry for new products. There’s a good chance that media reach (which expands far beyond just the place you’re starting from) will be much stronger.

We chose New York for Lemonade’s home. We see NY’ers as an ideal representation of our target demographic and personality. So we invested our efforts in a select few outlets that are read by our first wave of early adopters of the city’s financial workers and young professionals — NY Post, Bloomberg and Wall Street Journal.

4 . Brand and messaging

Building a great brand involves a lot of consumer psychology. You spend weeks trying to figure out the best tagline, the perfect ad and the right illustrator to do your art. If you get this right, you have a real chance at grabbing your customers’ attention.

The first few months of brand activation are critical. Limiting yourself to a select region or demographic allows you to be laser-focused on framing and positioning.

Lemonade Local

Building an insurance company from scratch, in New York, one of the toughest regulatory environments in the country, is a huge undertaking. The sheer complexity and investment required to get to the starting point includes raising a lot of capital and hiring the right people to be able to get licensed by the state’s Department of Financial Services.

This is the life of a company that operates in a highly regulated industry, and it’s unlike anything I’ve ever seen in the tech space. For Daniel and me, the decision to start in one state was simple. There’s no other way. Insurance carriers have to choose a state. Just one. And then maybe, if you play nice, regulators will let you go for more.

We wanted to launch Lemonade in one state — NY, and even more so when we realized we had no choice 🙂

See also: Lemonade: A Whole New Paradigm  

In the last three months since our New York launch, we’ve had overwhelming demand coming in from all over the country to open up for business in more states. This was very encouraging because it showed us hints of initial demand and product market fit to people and age groups that we never thought would be our early adopters.

But what surprised us most was the excitement coming from unexpected places, such as government offices and regulators. Having a favorable regulatory environment is a great opportunity to bring an honest, affordable, transparent and fun insurance experience to everyone in the U.S.!

Be the first to know how we’re making progress with our nationwide expansion.

Here’s the list of states where we will gradually launch in the coming year or so:

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin

* States in bold represent the ones most requests to launch came from

This article originally appeared here, and you can find more about Lemonade here.

Insuring a ‘Slice’ of the On-Demand Economy

In our emerging on-demand economy, Blue Ocean strategy will abound for P&C and life and annuity (L&A) In this post, I will focus on the Blue Ocean strategies that are needed in the P&C insurance industry.

The essence of Blue Ocean strategy, as discussed in W. Chan Kim’s and Renee Mauborgne’s 2005 book Blue Ocean Strategy, is “that companies succeed not by battling competitors but rather by creating ‘blue oceans’ of uncontested market space.” Society’s expanding on-demand economy is generating newly uncontested P&C insurance markets.

These new insurance markets are being formed from the blurring of consumer and corporate exposures that have historically been considered separate exposures by insurance companies, intermediaries, regulators and customers.

My objective in this post is to discuss the emergence of a new insurance player, a licensed insurance intermediary, that offers insurance that the Transportation Network Company (TNC) drivers—specifically Uber and Lyft drivers—should purchase to protect themselves, their ride-share vehicles and their passengers.

TNC drivers have insurance requirements for all three time periods

From the moment they “tap the app on” to the moment they “tap the app off,” Uber and Lyft drivers generate a fusion of personal and commercial automobile insurable exposures. The fused automobile insurable exposures are in play throughout three three time periods during which drivers need to protect themselves; their personal vehicles being used as ride-share vehicles to pick up, transport and drop-off their passengers; and, of course, their passengers.

The three time periods are:

  1. Time Period 1: This period begins when an app is turned on or someone logs in to the app but when there is no ride request from a prospective passenger. The driver can be logged into Uber, Lyft or both, but the driver is waiting for a request for a ride.
  2. Time Period 2: This period begins when the driver is online and has accepted a request for a ride but has yet to pick up a passenger.
  3. Time Period 3: This period begins when the driver is online and a passenger is in the car but has yet to be dropped off at the destination.

No, your personal automobile insurer probably does not cover the ride-share

It would be foolhardy (at best) and extremely costly (to the ride-share drivers) to assume the insurance policy that covers the driver’s personal automobile would also cover the exposures the driver generates as a TNC driver throughout the three time periods.

However, there is an expanding list of personal automobile insurers that:

  • cover time period 1 for ride-share drivers—TNC companies do not provide coverage during this period; and
  • will not cancel a driver’s personal automobile insurance policy if the driver tells the insurance company she is using the vehicle as a ride-share vehicle while driving for Uber or Lyft.

But the fact remains that there is a paucity of insurers that cover the personal and commercial automobile risks for people using a vehicle as a ride-share vehicle during all three time periods.

Further, drivers could very well find themselves with insufficient coverage even if the TNC provides coverage during time periods 1 and 2.

The paucity represents Blue Ocean uncontested market opportunities

The opportunities are the drivers’ need for insurance coverage to:

  • the fullest amount possible given the requirements of each state and each driver’s situation (i.e. the cost to repair the vehicle will differ by vehicle and state where the driver operates)
  • fill the insurance gaps between 1) the driver’s personal automobile coverage; 2) what Uber or Lyft provide during time periods 2 and 3; and 3) what each state requires.

Simply put, depending on the type of vehicle the driver is using as the ride-share vehicle and the state where the driver is operating, it is entirely possible that whatever insurance the TNC provides—even if it meets the minimum requirements of the state—is inadequate to financially help the driver (Note: this is not meant to be an exhaustive list of financial requirements):

  • remediate/restore the ride-share vehicle to its pre-damaged condition;
  • pay for physical rehabilitation for the driver, passengers or pedestrians who are injured in an accident caused by a ride-share driver or a third-party;
  • pay for property remediation caused by the ride-share driver
  • pay the lawsuit of ride-share vehicle passengers who claim the driver attacked them;
  • pay for the lawsuit of ride-share drivers who claim a passenger attacked them; and
  • make payments in lawsuits brought by passengers or pedestrians injured or killed, or owners of property destroyed or damaged by the ride-share driver.

Slice emerges to provide hybrid personal and commercial P&C insurance

Slice Labs, a new player in the insurance marketplace based in New York City, is emerging to target this specific uncontested market space by providing Uber and Lyft drivers with access to hybrid personal and commercial automobile insurance for all three time periods. In a March 29, 2016, press release, the company announced it secured $3.9 million in seed funding led by Horizons Ventures and XL Innovate.

I truly appreciate and personally respect Slice for taking the time to enter this Blue Ocean market space in the “right way” by first becoming licensed in the states where the company wants to operate. Currently, Slice is licensed to conduct business for Uber and Lyft drivers in seven states: California, Connecticut, Iowa, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Texas and Washington.

Getting licensed

Moreover, Slice’s business model is to operate as a licensed insurance intermediary with underwriting and binding authority. The intermediary has become licensed as insurance agents for personal and commercial P&C, excess and surplus (E&S), and accident and health (A&H) insurance. Slice also has managing general agency licenses in the states where that license is required to sell the hybrid insurance coverage. Slice is taking this path of licensure because it is using a direct model and doesn’t plan to distribute through agents (intending instead to distribute through the TNC platforms and directly to the drivers).

Further, because this is a hybrid personal and commercial automobile insurance opportunity, Slice is designing and filing the requisite policy forms in each state where it wants to operate.

Slice is underwriting the risk, but it is not financially carrying the risk. For that, Slice will be working with primary insurers and reinsurers. Slice has not yet reached the point where it can identify which (re)insurers are providing the capability. Obviously, without having the insurance financial capacity, Slice can’t operate in the marketplace (unless Slice plans to use its seed financing and future investment rounds for that purpose—assuming that is allowed by each state where Slice wants to operate).

It is also important to know which (re)insurers are providing the capacity. I hope Slice releases that information very soon.

Conducting business with Slice

A driver purchases the hybrid policy by registering on the Slice app (registering is the process of the driver receiving and accepting the offer to apply for insurance), which triggers Slice’s underwriting process. At the completion of the underwriting process, Slice generates and sends the driver a price for the policy that will cover the driver’s fused personal and commercial automobile insurance requirements for each cycle of turning on and off the Uber or Lyft app.

Once the driver purchases the policy, Slice sends the driver the declaration page and policy in a form required by each state. Slice will send the DEC page and policy digitally if that is allowed by the state. Moreover, the Slice app will show the proof of insurance, the time periods the insurance policy is in effect and the amount of premium being charged during the time period from “app on to app off.”

If there is a claim, the driver will file the first notice of loss through the Slice app. Although Slice plans to work with third-party adjusters to manage the claim process, the driver will only interact with Slice until the claim reaches a final resolution.

What do you think?

Will this uncontested market space remain uncontested for very long? I sincerely doubt it. The addressable market is huge: every Uber and Lyft ride-share driver who does not have the requisite insurance or doesn’t have sufficient insurance (the two are not necessarily the same animal).

What do you think of Slice, of this market opportunity and of other on-demand economy opportunities that reflect a fusion of personal and commercial insurance exposures?

Venture Capital and Tech Start-ups

Unicorns – to some they are just mythical creatures of lore. To today’s tech world, a unicorn is a pre-IPO tech start-up with a billion-dollar market value. These are the companies driving innovation, technology and disruption in every corner of every business, and their impact is truly being felt across the insurance industry.

The number of unicorns is as elusive as the creatures themselves, as the herd is growing rapidly.

“Fortune counts more than 80 unicorns today, but more appear with each passing week. Some even received their horns, so to speak, as the magazine went to press. And they’re getting bigger — there are now at least eight ‘decacorns,’ unicorns valued at $10 billion or more. So much for being mythical.” — Fortune

Recognizing the powerful sway that unicorns have over new technologies, business models and more, insurers are now getting into the unicorn game themselves. They are identifying technology start-ups that can transform insurance and are becoming venture capitalists to tap into this great potential for creating the next generation of insurance.

Different models and approaches are being used to identify, assess and influence these companies’ offerings. By understanding the benefits of outside-in thinking, insurers are finding ways to leverage these innovations. Some insurers are partnering with leading technology firms. Some of the large insurers are setting up their own venture capital firms. Still others are creating consortia to fund new start-ups to help accelerate innovation.

Insurers and Unicorns

The following are a few examples of new partnerships in 2015; the trend is continuing;

AXA– In February 2015, AXA announced the launch of AXA Strategic Ventures, a €200M fund to boost technology start-ups focused on customer acquisition, climate change, travel insurance and more. The goal is to advance AXA’s digital and customer strategy by connecting with new technologies, new solutions,and new ways of thinking. The company anticipates the fund will complement AXA’s major operating investments, across all entities, into research and digital developments that will help transform how customers experience AXA.

XL Insurance – On April 1, 2015, XL Insurance announced the formation of a venture capital fund, XL Innovate, to support insurance technology start-ups, with a focus on developing new capabilities in the insurance sector. XL indicated that this effort would extend its capabilities in existing markets and give it new opportunities to address some of the most pressing and complex risk problems in the global economy. In addition, XL sees it as a critical element to driving focus on innovation forward while securing relevance in the future.

Global Insurance Accelerator – In February 2015, a group of seven Iowa-based insurers announced the formation and launch of the Global Insurance Accelerator (GIA), an insurance accelerator for start-ups. The start-ups receive $40,000 in seed money from the pool to create a minimum viable product to present to the Global Insurance Symposium. The insurers involved believe that the accelerator program will bring potential innovation and technology insights to the insurance industry.

The Future

Innovation, technology and the need to be future-ready are fueling today’s unicorns and their capital supporters rapidly expanding the herd. In turn, these new business models and market leaders are spawning challenges and opportunities for all companies.

Today’s forward-thinking insurance companies are running their businesses while simultaneously creating their futures as Next-Gen insurers. It’s critical to recognize the power and benefits of innovation and the role that unicorns play in planning for tomorrow.

This is a decisive time as Next-Gen insurers emerge along with their unicorns to disrupt and redefine insurance and competitive advantage. What is your company’s approach to leverage and experiment with emerging technologies, start-ups and unicorns to fuel the potential and enable future market leadership?