Tag Archives: workplace task force

New Approach to Mental Health

In recent years, thought leaders in business, government and risk management have developed a sophisticated understanding of the bottom-line impacts of untreated mental illness in the workplace. For example, mental health and brain science dominated the agenda at the Davos World Economic Forum in 2015. And the National Business Group on Health held its first CEO Mental Health Summit in October 2015. Among the costs highlighted in these forums: worker productivity loss, high healthcare utilization rates, skyrocketing disability outlays and employment litigation.

To further advance mental wellness in the workplace, it’s essential for legal and human resources to be part of this collective effort. Here, we explore this disparity in approaches, and discuss why it is so harmful to the interests of all – employers, insurers, employees and their families.

See also: Language and Mental Health

What most thought leaders know about workplace mental health, in a nutshell, is this:

  1. Mental illness is common and treatable, with a 25% incidence rate and an 80% recovery rate, akin to chronic physical illnesses;
  2. Early detection and treatment are the most effective and inexpensive means of helping employees get well and return to full productivity quickly; and
  3. If an employee takes a leave of absence, the longer the absence, the less likely the employee is to return to work.

Thus, the organizational strategic imperative is to create workplace conditions designed to enhance early detection and treatment, restoring the status quo as efficiently as possible.

In stark contrast to this organizational imperative, legal and human resources professionals often advise supervisors, managers and EAP professionals to treat potential emotional and mental health issues exclusively as a performance matter. This advice is usually driven by a desire to “avoid an ADA claim.” However, this approach usually postpones the inevitable and makes a claim under the Americans with Disabilities Act more, not less, likely.

The result is often this pattern: a continuing decline in the employee’s condition and work performance, a severing of trust between employee and supervisor and isolation from others at work. Once a disciplinary action or performance improvement plan is imposed, both parties cut ties, and the result is a toxic cycle of leave of absence, disability claim, a request for accommodation, a failed interactive process, separation of employment and either litigation or a pay package. This is an expensive, disruptive and painful process that can often be avoided.

Employers would do well to consider this as an alternative approach:

Design a mental health policy that will unify executive leadership, legal counsel and human resources around the organization’s strategic approach to overall wellness.

  • This policy defines the vision, and the business case, for improving the mental health of the workforce and using the ADA interactive process as an effective means of achieving early detection and treatment of these impairments.
  • Training for supervisors, managers, legal counsel, HR, EAP staff and healthcare providers will highlight: A timely and collaborative exchange of information and interactive process maximizes success; the ADA does not require a fundamental alteration of any job; work teams and supervisors need to partner with HR on making accommodations work.
  • The policy will establish a confidential process for employees to obtain affordable, accessible treatment (either through existing vendors or through curated referrals).
  • Developing and implementing the mental health policy can stimulate and engage your organization in a discussion of the high incidence of emotional and mental health impairments and how these common, treatable conditions can be accommodated.
  • Mental Health 101 Training should be integrated into total wellness programs, including how to mitigate and address stressors in the workplace, how to respond to a colleague or supervisee who may be struggling and how to seek help confidentially.
  • Mental health champions should be designated, trained and made available as confidential resources to anyone at any point in the chain of command dealing with a mental health issue.

When executive leadership, legal counsel and human resources unify behind a strategic, business-savvy approach grounded in total wellness and ADA compliance, everybody wins.

See also: Why Mental Health Matters in Work Comp  

Insurance Thought Leadership’s continuing series of articles focused on suicide prevention is written by the Workplace Task Force of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention, the public-private partnership championing suicide prevention as a national priority.

Employers’ Role in Preventing Suicide

American adults working full time spend an average of 47 hours per week at their workplace (Gallup 2013). For those dealing with a mental health issue or thoughts of suicide, employers have an important opportunity to create safeguards to protect those who may be at risk.

There are many reasons why an employee may keep concerns about his or her mental health private. Stigma, fear of losing one’s job, and lack of awareness can prevent an individual from seeking help. It can also prevent someone who is concerned about a co-worker from reaching out when they may be needed most.

Research shows that 70% of those who die by suicide tell someone or give warning signs before taking their own life. Coworkers see each other every day and are more apt to notice changes in mood and behavior. For this reason, they play a key role in identifying potential suicide risk and mental health crises in their peers.

See also: Blueprint for Suicide Prevention  

Mental health education and awareness programs can help to create an environment where employees feel comfortable reaching out for help and should be a primary component of workplace wellness initiatives. Employers can implement the following strategies that not only connect their employees with help but also promote a culture of mental health awareness:

Health Promotion

Health promotion programs enable employees to take action to better their health. While employers often use health promotion to encourage physical health changes, employers can use health promotion to discuss mental health issues and encourage a culture of employee engagement and connection, as well. National Depression Screening Day, held on Oct. 6 this year, raises awareness for depression and related mood and anxiety disorders. The annual campaign provides employers with an opportunity to start the conversation with employees about mental health.

Online Screenings

Anonymous online screenings are a proven way to reach those in need and help direct them to appropriate assistance. Employees can take a screening to determine if the symptoms they are experiencing are consistent with a mental health disorder (i.e., depression, generalized anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, an eating disorder or a substance use disorder). Upon completion of a screening, employees are provided with immediate results and linked back to employee assistance program or local community resources. If your organization does not currently have an online screening program, a more general anonymous screening can be taken here.

Suicide Prevention Awareness

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently released data showing a 24% increase on average of suicide rates from 1999 to 2014. It is critical that employees learn how to talk with someone about mental health, understand how to recognize warning signs of suicide and know the actions to take to get themselves or a coworker the help they need.

The National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention’s Workplace Task Force champions suicide prevention as a national priority and cultivates effective programming and resources within the workplace. The task force provides support for employers and motivates them to implement a comprehensive, public health approach to suicide prevention, intervention and “postvention” in the workplace. Programs like the Workplace Task Force are important sources of knowledge and assistance for employers.

See also: 6 Things to Do to Prevent Suicides  

Employers can provide resources such as Stop a Suicide Today, which educates individuals about the warning signs of suicide and steps to take if they are concerned about a coworker or loved one. There are also other lifesaving resources, like the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-TALK (8255)).

The World Health Organization estimates that depression will be the second leading cause of disability by 2020. Employers have the option to act as catalysts for early detection and prevention when it comes to mental health disorders and suicide, which can lead to improved quality of life for individuals, as well as for the organization itself.

Suicide Prevention: Talk About It at Work

Suicide is a serious public health problem — but is preventable.

Suicide has a dramatic impact on the workplace in both human and financial terms. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, suicide was the 10th-leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2010. There were 38,364 suicides—an average of 105 each day. In addition to the loss of life and suffering of surviving family members, colleagues and friends, the suicides resulted in an estimated $34.6 billion in combined medical and work loss costs.

In addition, for every one suicide, there are 25 attempted suicides. An estimated 8.3 million adults (3.7% of the adult U.S. population) reported having suicidal thoughts in the past year.

We want business leaders to understand that suicide prevention IS a workplace issue, and that they can create an environment where individuals are more likely to reach out for the help they need.

You likely already have employee benefits, such as an employee assistance program (EAP), in place that offer valuable resources for employees and family members in need. Unfortunately, most people who attempt suicide do not reach out to the resources that are available to them.

Simply talking can save lives. (Let’s dispel the myth right here – talking about it does not trigger suicidal thoughts or attempts. When the subject of suicide is treated responsibly in a non-sensational manner, discussion can generate increased awareness and understanding, thereby increasing the chance that the person suffering from suicidal thoughts will seek and receive support and help.) When barriers come down and people seek help for mental illness, as many as 90% can significantly reduce their symptoms and improve their quality of life.

So, specifically, what can you do?

You can begin with a campaign to de-stigmatize mental health issues and to encourage people to seek help. Create a supportive environment where corporate leadership shows that they value physical and emotional health. Convey key messages such as, “It’s a sign of strength to ask for help,” and encourage employees to take talk of suicide seriously, whether in a family member, friend or co-worker.

Many employers are beginning to create greater dialogue on this topic. The National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention is the public-private partnership advancing the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention. The Workplace Task Force of this group, in particular, has developed several public service announcements targeted at employers and organizational leaders. The group has also developed tools to support the workplace in addressing suicide prevention.

For more information, including a comprehensive blueprint for a workplace suicide prevention program, visit the National Alliance for Suicide Prevention, Workplace Task Force.

For information on an anti-stigma campaign, visit stampoutstigma.com.