Tag Archives: Workers’ Compensation & Risk Conference

Workers’ Comp Market Trends

Senior executives from some of the top California workers’ compensation carriers identified emerging trends that are of great importance to California employers at the 2015 California Workers’ Compensation and Risk Conference.

Panelists were:

  • Moderator: Pamela Ferrandino, national casualty practice leader at Willis North America
  • Mike Mulray, chief underwriting officer at Everest National
  • John Dickey, regional president at Liberty Mutual
  • Mike Hessling, chief client officer at Gallagher Bassett
  • Glen-Roberts Pitruzzello, vice president of workers’ compensation, group benefits claim strategy and clinical operations, at the Hartford

The WCIRB projects the estimated average medical cost-per-claim will be the lowest since 2007. What do you think are the key drivers behind this improvement?

  • The independent medical review (IMR) process. IMRs are being upheld in favor of the employer – around 90% of the time. That is showing that evidence-based protocols are being followed.
  • Medical inflation has decreased. Effective utilization review (UR) programs have had a positive effect on controlling medical costs.

Will the greater use of generic drugs in the California drug formulary materially lower workers’ compensation costs?

  • Texas is a good example. We have not seen any major pushback from what Texas has done. Texas communicated to the providers, so they know how to work within the new environment. There are reports showing that the new system has been successful.
  • It could help decrease employers’ costs by 10% to 15%. There could be much broader implications to the claimant, as well. It is not just about the money, though; the upside is also the social benefit of avoiding addiction issues.

How do you see medical marijuana affecting employers?

There are three areas:

  1. Intoxication policies come into play when you have an employee using marijuana not related to a workers’ compensation claim.
  2. To date, New Mexico is the only state that ruled for compensable treatment, but the employee was already using marijuana prior to injury. This will likely continue to be challenged in various states.
  3. Medical advocacy will continue to prove effectiveness vs. the alternatives, like opioids.

What insights have you gleaned from predictive modeling?

  • We have had some great success from the claims standpoint. There have been some great advances in tools to help with predictive modeling over the past five to 10 years, like text mining, which allows modelers to look for keywords in cases that show a trend.
  • Predictive modeling can be used to see how to prevent claims from even happening. It is more effective to try to keep the claim from occurring, rather than controlling costs once a claim has occurred.
  • We are using predictive modeling more to drive early intervention in claims to reduce the costs, but we also are trying to see how we can use this information for risk control and reduce claims altogether.
  • Almost all predictive models have a level of false positives. We need to learn to filter out the white noise that is not providing useful information.

Collectively, do you think SB 863 improvements will continue to adhere, or will they be chipped away just like the others?

  • The instant you change the rules, people try to find new loopholes. You cannot stop. One or two years of results is not a trend line to claim a victory. We will probably see erosion, and we will have to come up with solutions as an industry.
  • I’m not sure if we are seeing SB 863 play out as intended, because of issues like IMR and liens. There will probably be tweaking.
  • Many stakeholders are trying to prevent erosion, so there is cautious optimism.

What are trends to look for?

  • Formulary – we could adopt the Texas system, and, while it wouldn’t play out here exactly the same way, I think we need it.
  • Ways to reduce frictional costs for employers, like IMR.
  • The impact of a new president and immigration reform on the workers’ compensation system.
  • Attracting talent for claims adjuster positions.
  • The next generation of workers entering the workforce and becoming injured workers. Engaging with them as injured workers will be vastly different from how we have engaged with workers in the past. They will have different expectations.
  • Changes in the market cycle and how it affects the health of the workers’ comp system.

State of Workers’ Comp in California

At the 2015 California Workers’ Compensation & Risk Conference, this panel of industry stakeholders weighed in on the overall condition, including cost drivers and legislation, affecting California’s workers’ compensation system:

Moderator: Mark Walls, VP communications and strategic analysis at Safety National

David North, CEO at Sedgwick

Kevin Confetti, deputy chief risk officer at University of California

Ann Schnure, VP risk management, claims, at Macy’s

Dawn Watkins, AIC, PHR, ARM, director integrated disability management at LA Unified School District

Julius Young, partner at Boxer & Gerson

Richard M. Jacobsmeyer, founding partner at Shaw, Jacobsmeyer, Crain & Claffey

The first question was: How does the California’s workers’ compensation system compare with other states?

California ranks #1 in costs compared with the rest of the U.S. California simply has more claims that cost more money. That is why California is the most expensive and complicated state.
Every time California changes a law, the system gets more complex. What influences workers’ comp is far more than just the laws, though. The social norms are different in California. It is a unique culture of employment that affects everything. There are a lot of things that employers and the healthcare community do that are driving these costs.

Why are claims costs so expensive in the Los Angeles basin vs. the rest of California?

Injured employees are transferred away at a larger rate from the primary treating physician of the employer’s choice. There is a very different treatment pattern compared with other states, and this medical treatment is driving costs for employers. Litigation rates are higher, which is part of the culture in that area. Very often, LA attorneys try to take medical control and send the injured employees to the doctors that the attorneys prefer. Attorneys and physicians who have had long-lasting relationships are referring almost exclusively to each other. Attorneys are aggressively advertising to injured workers, and workers are responding.

What else is driving workers’ compensation costs in California as a whole?

Once an employee gets an attorney referral, it is out of the employer’s hands. The employer no longer has the authority to properly take care of the injured worker. California is the only state where, if you do not like what you are paid, you file a lien. This has nothing to do with the quality of care for the injured worker. The root of so many of these issues is the doctor community in the state. Maybe the doctors need to be trained on billing and medical treatment utilization schedule  (MTUS), but it’s believed that some may be billing higher than the fee schedule to see if someone will actually pay the higher rate billed. The most important person in workers’ comp is the injured worker. We should be spending all the money that employers pay on things like bill review on helping the worker heal. Too much of the costs that employers pay are not going to the injured worker.

What concerns do you have about current legislation and case law affecting the system?

We, mistakenly, have allowed legislation to tell us how to comply. It has become much more about the process rather than helping an injured worker get better. Doctors will say how they think they should treat, but have to send the case through utilization review, which sometimes contradicts the doctor’s opinion. This deflates that injured worker’s confidence on whether he is getting the best care. It is possible that doctors are not trained on the MTUS and keep trying to push things through the system that shouldn’t be. We should focus on how to better train doctors on the system. The system is so complicated. What employers need to do is try to stop the employees from getting into the system. We need to intervene fast. Get the employees good, quality medical care quickly and eliminate the potential for them to get stuck in the system.

How do you improve the quality of benefits to injured workers in California?

The least-likely employee to file a claim is the employee who thinks her employer cares about her. Employees are much less likely to litigate cases if the employer is providing them with good care and communication. That’s the gold standard for trying to decrease litigation. It is so important for employers to reflect on how they are treating their injured workers. Are you treating them like a member of your team or just another expense? Often, they are afraid that they are going to lose their job. Let them know what workers’ comp is and what they should expect. It is so complicated. Make sure they are well-informed and understand that return to work means they are not going to lose their job because of an injury. Claims examiners in California have a tough job. We need to hire smart people and give them appropriate workloads. They are the glue that holds everything together. California currently has a shortage of qualified adjusters, and it is a large problem. The industry, as a whole, needs to contribute to this issue so we can get quality people interested in this career path.