Tag Archives: Verisk

Keys to Loyalty for P&C Customers

In a rapidly changing industry, some P&C insurers are pulling ahead of their competitors by focusing on customer satisfaction and retention.

“The insurance industry as we know it is at the edge of a new business environment,” says  Michael Costonis , head of Accenture’s global insurance practice. “Breaking away from the pack and capturing new revenue opportunities requires a shift in business mindset – a shift from product-focused to customer-focused.”

Customers want extra benefits, and one way to provide them is to offer value-added services. Travel companies and other insurance branches are already exploring the benefits of value-added services for retaining customers, as  Jamie Biesiada  at Travel Weekly points out. Because P&C insurers have been slower to adopt this strategy, however, many opportunities for capitalizing on this strategy remain.

Here, we look at some of the most popular value-added services in P&C insurance, which of these services focus on building loyalty and how to create the right service offerings or packages to encourage your customers to stay with your company in the long term.

Value-Added Services: The State of the Industry

For many years, P&C insurers have struggled with the challenge of selling a product that is substantially similar to their competitors’ products. “Because customers don’t discern much difference between insurers, companies end up competing largely on price,” write Bain & Co. partners Henrik Naujoks, Harshveer Singh and Darci Darnell . A downward spiral occurs, in which costs and profits are cut and customers jump ship the moment they see the same coverage for a few dollars less.

See also: How to Build Customer Loyalty in Insurance  

When insurers compete on price, customers do what Brandon Carter at Access calls the services shuffle: quitting or threatening to quit their insurance providers to access the same price-lean deals that new customers receive. “My goal is to pay less in a system that actually punishes people for being loyal customers,” Carter explains. Focusing on cost decimates loyalty. Focusing on value can boost it.

Yet insurance companies aren’t making value-added services their first choice when it comes to customer retention  Tom Super, director of the P&C insurance practice at J.D. Power, adds that many P&C insurers are turning to digital tools to court customers, particularly in the auto insurance business.

But digital technology is only a tool. The insurers that will stay ahead of their competitors in the race for customer retention and loyalty are the ones that best leverage that tool to provide the value customers want, says Mikaela Parrick  at Brown & Joseph.

Which Value-Added Services Boost Customer Loyalty?

Value-added services provide an extra benefit that enhances the core product or service. This additional service may be offered at little or no cost for the customer, yet it may make both the customer’s and the insurer’s work easier.

Connecting experience-based services to the product and brand can be a powerful way to encourage loyalty, adds Roman Martynenko , the founder and global executive vice president at Astound Commerce. While this approach is most commonly seen in retail, P&C insurers can adapt it to their needs. A top-of-the-line mobile app or a personalized starter kit featuring smart tools for each customer’s home can make customers feel like they’re part of a family.

Unique, innovative or specially tailored value-added services can also help encourage loyalty and boost customer interest by becoming a cornerstone of an insurance company’s brand.

Value-added services don’t have to be expensive or complex, suggests Mike McGee of Investment Insurance Consultants. For instance, a disaster preparation email sent at the start of tornado or hurricane season can help customers take loss-prevention steps, address safety and feel supported by their insurer, at very little cost to the insurance company.

Partnering with other companies can boost loyalty for both organizations while providing value-added services that attract customers, digital transformation executive Fuad Butt says on the IBM insurance industry blog. For instance, working with telecommunications providers to offer reduced-rate packages can help both companies succeed.

A highly specific partnership that uses existing technology to add value for both customers and companies is the recently announced alliance between Hyundai Motor America and data analytics firm Verisk.

“Hyundai customers will have access to their portable Verisk driving score, which can lead to discount offers on UBI programs and support driver feedback that helps improve their driving,” says  Manish Mehrotra , director of digital business planning and connected operations for Hyundai Motor America. A similar arrangement through an auto insurer can help both insurers and drivers have access to more information to improve safety and make better choices.

Choosing and Implementing Value-Added Services in P&C Insurance

The changing landscape of insurance offers one significant advantage to companies seeking to improve their value-added services: access to data about why customers remain loyal.

“The connections that enable excellent customer experiences aren’t always easy to make,” says Chris Hall of Pitney-Bowes. Siloing fragments customer information, leaving staff without a complete picture of each customer. This fragmentation makes it difficult to determine which value-added services will actually pique customers’ interest.

If data access is an issue, start by de-siloing information to get a better sense of each customer. Then, find the services that best support your organization’s key differences from your competitors.

Kirk Ford , compliance and T&C manager at RWA Business, suggests first considering how you’d like your clients and customers to perceive your brand in relation to competitors. Balance your differences against your similarities so that customers see they’ll receive all the services they need, but with the value-added extras that make their relationship with this particular insurance company meaningful.

See also: The Future of P&C Distribution  

However your insurance organization chooses to add value, resist the urge to announce it to customers merely as being higher-quality. “It doesn’t matter whether or not a company can pull off quality or exceptional service because quality and customer service rarely are differentiating strategies,” adds  Mac McIntire , president of the Innovative Management Group.

Instead,  Ryan Hanley  formerly of Agency Nation, now at Bold Penguin, recommends finding ways your value-added services can improve customer lives. When customers feel a sense of shared values, they’re more likely to stick with their insurance company, rather than risk their luck with a company that may not share those values—even if the prices are lower.

One way to connect with customer values is to change your company’s language surrounding insurance. “If you can sell insurance and not talk about insurance, it’s a win-win,” says  Rusty Sproat , founder of Figo Pet Insurance. He notes that many customers find insurance language obscure and frustrating. That’s why Sproat’s company focuses on providing quality information on pet care and health, switching the conversation to insurance only when necessary to complete a transaction.

Finally, don’t shy away from technology—but use it as a tool rather than a cure-all. Smart home sensors, telemetrics for vehicles and other tech tools are increasingly common in U.S. households, plus they can greatly improve the customer experience, says  Ramaswamy Tanjore  at Mindtree. Consider the best ways to manage telemetric or other data, as well as how to position these tools to best showcase their value to loyal customers.

Harvey Hammers Home NFIP Issue

The economic devastation and human suffering that Hurricane Harvey inflicted on vast numbers of people will sorely test the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) as it comes up for renewal, with the NFIP lapsing if Congress and the president fail to act by the end of the month. Some in the federal government, state regulators, industry experts and this economist favor solutions encouraging private sector participation in flood insurance markets. Near-term, the most likely and wisest course seems to be a short extension allowing the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and NFIP to focus on settling claims while politicians and policy experts develop longer-term solutions.

With the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) reporting the NFIP was $24.6 billion in debt before Hurricane Harvey, many in government and elsewhere feel significant reforms are needed. Other knocks against the NFIP as currently constituted include its reliance on allegedly inaccurate and out-of-date flood insurance rate maps (FIRMS), its failure to charge actuarially appropriate premiums and policy limits too low to provide adequate insurance protection. Some also contend that the NFIP encourages excessive risk taking and poor land use by providing subsidized insurance coverage for properties that repeatedly get flooded out, effectively divorcing those who choose to reside in flood prone locations from the consequences of their decisions.

Uncertainty about the exact extent of the devastation caused by Harvey will persist for some time, as the huge number of properties damaged by the storm, difficult conditions and continuing lack of access to some of the hardest-hit areas all add to the time necessary to assess losses. Further complicating efforts to understand the magnitude of the losses caused by Harvey, published reports often fail to clearly distinguish between economic losses, insured losses covered by private carriers and insured losses covered by the NFIP. Nonetheless, it appears Hurricane Harvey may exhaust the NFIP’s financial capacity, causing the program to go still deeper in debt.

See also: Harvey: First Big Test for Insurtech  

The NFIP purchased private reinsurance covering 26% of its losses between $4 billion and $8 billion, but Fitch Ratings believes losses from Hurricane Harvey could consume the NFIP’s $1.04 billion in reinsurance protection.

As Congress and the president ponder the way forward, the options available to them include several that would facilitate development of private markets for flood insurance akin to the private markets for homeowners insurance. Key elements of such solutions include measures clarifying mortgage lenders’ ability to use flood coverage underwritten by private carriers to satisfy insurance requirements imposed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

The development of private markets for flood insurance will also require that the NFIP adopt actuarially sound pricing. Simply put, private carriers that must cover their costs and earn an adequate rate of return on capital would be at a tremendous disadvantage competing against taxpayer-subsidized coverage from the NFIP. And it would certainly help if carriers currently participating in the NFIP’s WYO Program were allowed to also offer alternative coverage. Currently, the WYO Program includes a non-compete clause that precludes carriers from offering alternative standalone flood insurance.

The constituencies supporting increased private sector involvement in flood insurance markets include the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, the Property Casualty Insurers Association of America, the National Association of Mutual Insurance Companies and the American Insurance Association, which have all come out in favor of the Flood Insurance Market Parity and Modernization Act passed unanimously by the House in 2016.

Thinking more broadly, there may be no need for the federal government to participate directly in the flood insurance business. Mechanisms akin to state FAIR and Beach Plans could serve as insurers of last resort for property owners unable to obtain coverage from private carriers. Or, we could transition from the NFIP as it exists today to a new NFIP modeled on the Terrorism Risk and Insurance Program (TRIP) introduced after the terrorists destroyed the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. Under that program, insurers must offer terrorism coverage, with policyholders then free to accept or decline. If insured losses from a terrorist attack exceed specified triggers, the federal government provides reinsurance protection, and insurers subsequently reimburse the federal government.

Thinking still more broadly, there may be no need for the federal government to participate in the flood insurance business at all. With trillions of dollars flowing through global capital markets, catastrophe bonds and other insurance-linked securities could enable insurers and reinsurers to obtain all of the capacity necessary to cover flood risk without any federal reinsurance backstop.

See also: Time to Mandate Flood Insurance?  

An ideal solution would enable one policy to provide coverage for both wind losses and flood losses. As long as those losses are covered by separate policies, policyholders and insurers will remain burdened with having to distinguish wind losses from flood losses— a frequently contentious and often expensive undertaking that adds to the time necessary to settle claims.

In any case, private sector insurers and reinsurers now have access to data and sophisticated flood models that enable them to price and underwrite flood risk intelligently. And developments such as the new commercial flood insurance program recently introduced by ISO and Verisk Analytics set the stage for greater participation in flood insurance markets by ever greater numbers of insurers, as will the corresponding personal property flood insurance program they plan to roll out later this year. With state regulators and insurers aligned, it seems all that’s necessary to unleash the power of private markets is action on the part of Congress and the president. Why not send them a postcard?

The Next Step in Underwriting

When a person applies for a mortgage in the U.S., credit reports are pulled from all three bureaus — Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. Why? Because a single bureau does not provide the whole story. When you’re lending hundreds of thousands or millions of dollars it makes sense to find out as much as you can about the people borrowing the money. The lender wants the whole story.

When you’re underwriting the property, doesn’t it make sense to get more than one perspective on its risk exposure? Everyone in the natural hazard risk exposure business collects different data, models that data differently, projects that data in different ways and scores the information uniquely. While most companies start with similar base data, how it gets treated from there varies greatly.

When it comes to hazard data there are also three primary providers, HazardHub, CoreLogic and Verisk. Each company has its team of hazard scientists and its own way of providing an answer to whatever risk underwriting and actuarial could be concerned with. While there are similarities in the answers provided, there are also enough differences — usually in properties with questionable risk exposure — that it makes sense to mitigate your risk by looking at multiple answers. Like the credit bureaus, each company provides a good picture of risk exposure, but, when you combine the data, you get as complete a picture as possible.

See also: Next Generation of Underwriting Is Here  

Looking at risk data is becoming more commonplace for insurers. However, if you are looking at a single source of data, it is much more difficult to use hazard risk data to limit your risk and provide competitive advantage. Advances in technology (including HazardHub’s incredibly robust APIs) make it easier than ever to incorporate multi-sourced hazard data into your manual and automated underwriting processes.

As an insurer, your risk is enormous. Using hazard data — especially multi-sourced hazard data — provides you with a significantly more robust risk picture than a single source.

At HazardHub, we believe in the power of hazard information and the benefits of multi-sourcing. Through the end of July, we’ll append our hazard data onto a file of your choice absolutely free, to let you see for yourself the value of adding HazardHub data to your underwriting efforts.

For more information, please contact us.

Verified Burglar Alarms Reduce Losses

At a recent International Security Conference (ISC) law enforcement seminar, Chief Chris Vinson of the Texas Police Chiefs Association explained why verified burglar alarms work better: “We will give [them] the priority response [they] deserve. We will arrive on the scene in time to make an arrest. And making those arrests [is] what it is all about because when you increase arrests, you reduce the crime rate. When you reduce the crime rate, you are reducing property loss. When you reduce that property loss, it reduces the insurance rate for those property owners. When those insurance rates drop down [and] the crime rates drop down, then the property values go up, which makes our constituents happy.”

The burglar alarms matter so much because, with a video-verified burglar alarm, an operator at a central station can review on video what is happening at the site before calling 911 center. The operator serves as a virtual eyewitness to a crime in progress. And, when police are sure a crime is being committed, they respond faster and make more arrests.

(To see an excerpt from the seminar, click here:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nX3IzynaUUY)

A recent meeting between several of the major alarm companies and Verisk discussed how best to collect and quantify the advantages of professionally monitored video-verified alarm solutions for the insurance industry. Insurers are looking for technology and data to help them contain costs, and law enforcement and alarm response times are a crucial component. In April 2015, the largest police chiefs association in the country passed a resolution endorsing verified alarms and priority response.

The Texas Police Chiefs definition of a verified alarm requires Central Station monitoring with operators specifically trained to review videos and communicate the pertinent information to law enforcement. Home surveillance systems might work as a nanny-cam but lack the protocols and processes for alarm response provided by the central station. (Here is a link to the Texas Police Chiefs resolution on verified alarms:  http://www.ppvar.org/_asset/wfdzry/TPCA-Priority-Response-Resolution-2015.pdf)

Without technology and new policies, property losses will only get worse as the number of officers declines. At the recent ISC conference, officials from Akron, Ohio, and Chula Vista, CA, said their police departments had already shrunk because of budget cuts, forcing them to reconsider response to alarms — responding to false alarms represents between 8% and 15% of total calls for service at the 911 center. Akron adopted a “verified response policy” in 2014, and over the past year burglaries went down 5%, with increasing arrests.

Retired Capt. Gary Ficacci said Chula Vista was policing 260,000 people with 212 police officers, one of the leanest staff/population ratios in the county. The economic downturn caused the city to lose about 40 officers and provided the impetus to change the alarm ordinance to promote a form of verified response. Chula Vista figures it spends more  than $100,000 in officers and staff for every arrest made in response to a burglar alarm, but video verified alarms could cut that number significantly.

How much better can verified burglar alarms actually be? Radius Security in Vancouver, Canada, just completed a short study of its verified alarms compared with the traditional, unverified alarms. For Radius, its verified alarms were 1,000 times more effective. The arrest rate for unverified alarms is between 0.08% and 0.02%, while arrest rates for verified alarms are often in double-digit percentages.

Why? Because law enforcement treat a verified alarm like a crime in progress instead of something highly likely to be a false alarm.

Texas Chief Vinson says, “The calls that truly merit a higher priority response, those get pushed to the top. Those get the response they need to actually make arrests, and that is what we are all going for here, because if you take that guy off the street that is committing the offenses and you’ve solved that crime you have probably solved a handful of crimes that occurred before that he has already committed that he confesses to. And then you prevent all the crimes that he is not going to commit while he is sitting in jail. So, it is a big deal to make arrests on one of these calls, because it makes a difference in the actual crime rate that affects that city.”

(For video on Radius Data, click here:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AlXMGu-lT7g)