Tag Archives: UAV

Transformation of Roof Claim Processing

The property and casualty insurance industry is on the verge of a transformation. New sources of data are creating possibilities that were previously unthinkable and are changing ingrained business processes, but they are also overwhelming companies with data. One significant source of this coming inundation will be unmanned aerial vehicles and systems (UAVs and UASs, more commonly referred to as drones).

Soon, insurance companies will send drones to inspect roofs to determine P&C claims. Gone will be the days of adjusters risking personal safety while climbing and walking roofs to gather data and assess damage.

See also: Data and Analytics in P&C Insurance  

Much attention has been paid to the new methods of data collection and acquisition. Less attention has been paid to how industry will make efficient and economic use of the new data. The advent of new collection technologies necessitates the development of new data processing methods and processes. Merely adopting new methods for collecting visual data will not lead to significantly increased efficiencies or improved bottom lines. Data handling and business processing improvements must be coupled with new collection technologies.

The Constraints: Business, Technology and Regulations

The industry has been understandably cautious in adopting new technologies that will upset decades of established practice. There are numerous sources for this reluctance, the most important of which include:

  • Scale: With the drone industry in its infancy, insurance providers have expressed concern that few (if any) drone operators could meet demand within specific markets, much less across large geographic areas. Demand for inspections could potentially far outpace the supply of drones and drone operators and could require some firms to contract with multiple operators, thereby adding unwanted layers of complexity to operations.
  • Lack of confidence in the underlying technologies: There is also considerable concern that drone technologies have not yet matured sufficiently for widespread adoption. As an example, only recently has satellite imagery begun to be used more extensively. Adopting this technology so early in its development could expose companies to unpredictable downsides.
  • Lack of turnkey solutions: Drone operators have limited or no ability to provide analytics for the image data acquired. Insurance companies either need to develop their own image analytics technology or engage yet another third party to extract meaningful information from the data.
  • New technology supplanting drones: Some companies are concerned that tying themselves to drone technology providers will set them on a path-dependent course that may prevent them from adopting and profiting from unexpected developments of new technology.
  • Out with the new, keep the old: In many cases, the objection to adopting drones is that the old ways work. Insurance companies have weathered numerous technology changes through the years and are not eager to jettison tried-and-true processes and relationships.
  • Regulations: Another major concern has been the highly uncertain regulatory environment. The Federal Aviation Administration’s initial approach was highly restrictive, requiring pilot licenses for operators and effectively shutting the door to potential market entrants. The new round of regulations, specifically Rule 333 and Part 107, will reverse the overly restrictive pilot license rule and allow competitors to enter the market and drive down prices.

Most of these issues are temporary. The regulatory environment is maturing and stabilizing to allow the growth of a new industry. Over a relatively short period, the market will sort out issues related to scale and availability, maturity of drone technology and whether a newer, superior technology could quickly supplant drones. The market pressures to adopt new technology will make it increasingly untenable to resist innovation.

The issues that will continue to challenge the insurance industry are those related to analytics and business process integration, regardless of the regulatory environment, scale or specific data acquisition technology.

The How: AI, Machine Learning and Business Platforms

Drones are only the beginning of the story. They are merely the tool for collecting visual data, albeit with greater speed, safety, quality and depth than previously available. For an industry to make profitable use of this new source of data, however, visual data must be converted into meaningful information and must integrate seamlessly with all related business processes. Information must be extracted more efficiently from the data sources. Manually performing tasks such as damage detection will no longer be economically feasible given the volume of data and speed at which it will become available.

Companies that harness technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning will significantly improve operations and establish clear advantages. Powerful algorithms will automatically detect damage sustained by a structure (for example, hail damage on a roof) as recorded by drones. These algorithms will be faster and more accurate than any human adjuster, able to perform in mere minutes (or less) what requires hours for humans to do, and the algorithms will be self-training and self-improving.

However, data analysis still needs to be integrated with business processes such as settlement. A platform approach that combines data analytics with business processes, making the information instantly available to stakeholders, will be the most likely method of solving the problem. A fully integrated business platform would store, analyze and report data. It would eliminate reliance on multiple software applications and systems, bringing the full scope of business processes into a single, seamless package. In the case of roof damage claims, the platform approach would integrate detection of structural damage and determination of claim value, and it would issue a report and settlement payment for the homeowner, all with minimal human intervention and within minutes of receiving the visual data. Integrating advanced data analytics and business processes will allow companies access to real-time data and improve decision making with predictive analytics.

See also: 2 Key Tools for Innovation in P&C  

Platforms will also provide the infrastructure to connect insurance companies to drone operators, as well as policyholders. Platforms will provide a market exchange or job board for drone operators for hire across numerous markets, complete with their credentials and technical capacity. Insurance companies will be able to directly interact with their customers through platform technology.

The Why: Increased Competitiveness, Improved Customer Relations and the Bottom Line

The incentives to adopt new technologies are clear. Drones can acquire data more safely, faster, at lower cost and with higher quality than satellites or an army of adjusters. However, the industry will realize greater benefits from focusing on the analytics of the new data, rather than the specific method of collection and delivery of that data. Advanced analytics will drastically reduce the time to settle claims and will standardize the claims settlement process.

Those quick to adopt the new technologies will gain early competitive advantages and efficiencies relative to their peers. Combining analytics and a computing platform approach that harnesses AI and machine learning will simplify business processes—replacing inefficient, disaggregated tools, software applications and systems—and improve decision making. Those that make this leap earlier than their peers will have the clear advantage.

Faster, more accurate and more reliable claims settlement will lead to better business planning and risk management. Powerful computing platforms will allow insurance companies to employ predictive analytics that accurately and quickly determine business risks and provide tools for mitigating those risks.

Improving the claims settlement process will yield improved customer relations. Home repairs, especially significant ones like roof replacement, are a major source of anxiety for homeowners. Reducing the time to completion of repairs through increased processing speed and standardized claims estimates will increase customer satisfaction and loyalty.

Space, Aviation Risks and Higher Education

What do you do when a group of precocious students decide to build a satellite and launch it into space? Or, when they decide to build an unmanned aviation vehicle (UAV)—more commonly known as a drone—and fly it over a busy urban market? Or, when they design and launch a few rockets October Sky-style from a training field on campus before heading to a NASA competition for a chance at $50,000 in prize money?

As a risk manager, considering the answer to these questions may cause a heart palpitation or two as you think about the potential effects of these educational opportunities on the educational institution. Not only does the institution face increased liability and property damage risks, but there is also the potential for increased risk to reputation and even regulatory compliance considerations.

Insurance was likely the last thing the students at St. Thomas More Catholic School in Arlington, VA, were thinking about when they began construction on a shoebox-sized satellite called Cubesat. According to a Washington Post article, the purpose of Cubesat, which was released from the International Space Station on Feb. 15, 2016, is to beam photos from 200 miles above the Earth back to computers in their school library. You can view pictures from the satellite here.

See Also: Should We Take This Risk?

Insurance was also, probably, the last thing students from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater were thinking about in October 2015 when they launched their drone to capture aerial images of the new Whitewater City Market. According to the University of Wisconsin News, the purpose of the project was to respond to the market organizer’s request to geographically depict the organic growth of the Whitewater City Market. A video of the aerial images has been posted to YouTube and can be viewed here.

To the 54 college teams selected by NASA for 2015-2016 NASA Launch Challenge, insurance was likely pretty low on the list of considerations as the teams worked to design, construct, test, launch and successfully recover a high-powered reusable rocket and its payloads. The purpose of the challenge is to encourage participation in STEM fields and to examine innovative solutions to potential issues that may arise during space travel. There is also $50,000 in prize money for the top three teams that complete the challenge. For 2015-16, the competing rockets will be launched on April 16, 2016.

So, what are the risks associated with these types of activities, and how can insurance assist the college in transferring some of these risks?

According to a white paper recently published by Allianz, a large commercial insurer, these types of aviation/space risks can be bifurcated into two areas: (1) ground or pre-launch risks and (2) in-orbit or post launch risks.

Ground risks include:

  • Hazard or catastrophic risk to facilities because of fire. This type of risk can be significantly increased if someone is using flammable chemicals, such as nitrogen or any of the components present in rocket fuel. Keeping these materials on campus can create additional risk for the institution, which may not be contemplated in current insurance programs.
  • Transportation risk increases the risk of property and liability losses. Moving rocket components, including flammable materials, increases the potential for losses to (1) the components themselves and (2) a third party that may be injured as a result of an incident on the road.
  • Liability loss because of launch failure may result in damage to property near the launch site or even injury to a third party, faculty member or student. Failure to take adequate safety precautions during design/construction—working with chemicals, power tools and other materials—may result in increased potential for injury to students and faculty participating in the project.

Post-launch risks:

  • Loss of the object because of malfunction, damage or equipment failure, items that represent a significant investment of time, resources, and materials. Such a loss may result in the inability to participate in a competition, a loss of grant money or additional time spent rebuilding or reworking the project.
  • Liability loss due to in-air collision, falling objects or interference with another aerial object (such as a satellite signal or an airplane’s operating equipment)—these types of incidents may result in significant bodily injury or property damage of a third-party property.

Typical insurance policies maintained by most institutions may not provide adequate coverage for space/aviation risks:

Property policy—Provides coverage for loss or damage to property, equipment and materials of the university. Coverage is generally broad but may exclude: (1) hazardous materials, (2) property in transit or off premise, (3) property not owned by the university and (4) pollution because of the release of a hazardous substance or chemical.

General liability policy—Provides coverage for the injury or property damage of a third party because of the negligence of the institution or those operating on behalf of the institution. Coverage responds to a wide range of standard risks, but there may be exclusions for: (1) aviation risks, (2) loss caused by the acts of a third party, such as a student or contractor, (3) third-party liability related to a discharge of pollutants/chemicals, (4) loss of institutional reputation or cost of a crisis management team, (5) coverage for regulatory fines and penalties for failure to obtain proper permits, etc. and (6) the liability to a third party because of the failure of a vessel to perform as expected or because of a design flaw.

Automobile liability policy—Provides coverage for liability and property damage associated with the operation of a motor vehicle. Coverage responds to a wide range of standard risks, but there may be exclusions for: (1) pollution because of the discharge of a chemical substance transported on or in the vehicle, (2) liability for use of third-party transportation, such as a rental vehicle or bus charter or the use of a personal vehicle by a faculty member or student and (3) property damage to institutional property being transported on or in the vehicle.

There are additional types of coverage that may be needed, including:

Pollution coverage—Including premises pollution (to provide coverage for the institution’s own facilities) and pollution liability coverage (to provide coverage for third-party exposure to pollutants)

Aviation/space coverage—Specialized policies can provide coverage for losses to an aerial vessel or its equipment and, also, for the most common types of liability loss (collision, crash or interference). Note: Special endorsements may be required for drones.

Inland marine rider/policy—Provides coverage for scheduled equipment and property that may not otherwise be covered by the institution’s standard property coverage. This can include coverage for property that is being transported in a vehicle

Crisis management coverage—Provides coverage for loss or damage to the institution’s reputation; this may include coverage for the costs to engage a crisis mitigation team and public relations experts or the cost to take other steps to preserve and restore the reputation of the institution.

See Also: What Is the Future for Drones?

Professional liability—Provides coverage to professionals because of the failure of the design/construction or for the failure of the devise to perform as intended. This coverage may include coverage for damages not related to injury or to property damage— including the financial loss and the costs for rework and redesign.

Not all insurance policies are created equal—individual coverage and policies may respond differently. Please consult with an expert if you if you have questions about coverage for these types of institutional activities.

What Is the Future for Drones?

In 2013, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced to the world that the online retailer would begin to develop a “drone-to-door” delivery service for its loyal customers. Dubbed Amazon Prime Air, the system would deliver packages directly to your doorstep in just 30 minutes after an order is placed, setting a new and higher bar for “fast delivery.”

However, after a variety of issues and concerns were addressed by increasing regulations added by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), it  appeared that Bezos’ announcement would never get off the ground. But after two years of waiting for the FAA, Amazon will finally get to test these drones on U.S. soil — or, should I say U.S. air? — bringing customers one step closer to having their Tide detergent refilled by a delivery drone.

Despite the U.S. government dragging behind on approvals, for retail and civilian use, sales for drones aren’t expected to slow any time soon. Companies like Teal Group, an aerospace research firm, estimates that sales of both military and civilian drones will total more than $89 billion by 2023.

Other big companies, such as State Farm and AIG, are also getting into the drone business. In fact, State Farm is the first insurance company in the U.S. to receive regulatory approval to test drones for commercial use. With drones popping up in so many different industries, it makes me wonder, what impact will drones have on companies’ customer experience — good and bad?

The Good

State Farm plans on changing the insurance industry for the better, using drones to aid in natural disaster relief. For instance, instead of State Farm spending the money (and time) to ship hundreds of claims adjusters out to natural disaster sites to assess damages, the company will send only a handful of agents equipped with a drone partner to more efficiently survey damaged property.

Jason Wolf, a property defense attorney and shareholder at the Florida-based firm, Koch Parafinczuck & Wolf, stated in an interview to ClaimsJournal.com: “I envision a time when, after a catastrophe, an adjuster pulls up to a neighborhood and opens the trunk of his car and presses a few buttons on his tablet device, and the drone does an immediate survey of everything and streams it all right to his tablet device, and he knows exactly where to go first and what’s most significant within minutes. Costing very little money, the insurance company has a sense of everything that needs to be done in a very short amount of time.”

Imagine all the headaches this could mitigate for customers and employees after the chaos caused by unfortunate losses created by natural disasters.

It’s interesting, too, how this type of surveying will require additional training, but training we might be familiar with. Much like a police officer who trains alongside his dog in a K-9 unit, insurance adjusters will train alongside their partner – only, in this industry, it would be a drone.

While there is debate in the insurance world about how drones will operate, one thing is for sure – they will be operated and used to speed up services and save on cost, making customers’ lives a little easier. As such, claims assessment aided by a drone will yield quick turnarounds and an even quicker payout to the insured.

Additionally, insurance companies will start offering drone insurance to owners of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). RiskandInsurance.com noted that the general types of coverage that will be required for the use of UAS and ancillary business activities will include liability, personal injury, invasion of privacy, property and workers’ compensation. The publication also mentioned that, given the conservative nature of the insurance industry, carriers could place stricter guidelines on drone coverage than the FAA does.

Once regulated and insured, drones will be sent out into the community to collect data. For example, what if someone’s home flooded? Well, insurance companies could send their drone to the flooded house and survey the area for all damages, speeding up the process for families affected.

There is also the use of drones for the collection of data by third parties. Imagine that Ford is looking to target advertisements for a new truck to areas where the road conditions would demand the use of four-wheel drive. Ford hires an agency to send out drones to specific cities where it is looking to advertise.

This drone will collect data on road conditions and take images of cars on the road to make sure a majority of drivers are in trucks, and will then report back on economic conditions. Ford doesn’t want to be advertising where citizens can’t or won’t pay for the product.

In a world becoming more drone-centric, these types of background checks and data collections via UAS will become increasingly more frequent.

The Bad

The government review process for a drone is 120 days, but, by the end of the process, Amazon says the technology of the drone submitted for regulation is outdated. Therefore, Amazon must update its filing and submit to the FAA for regulation, starting the 120-day review process all over again.

The other concern of the FAA is air traffic. Coming down with a few regulations on drone flight, the FAA is requiring that drone controllers have sight of the drone at all times and that they must operate under 400 feet.

Exelis, a global aerospace, defense, information and services company, was featured in an article on Engadget recently, discussing its development of an air traffic control system for drones. Nearly ready for testing at the FAA approved drone-testing sites, the low-altitude monitoring system would keep tabs on compact aircrafts flying at or under the mandated 400 feet.

It’ll be interesting to see how industry giants, such as Amazon, overcome these obstacles to create a non-invasive customer experience with drone technology.

Once regulated, the next issue is invasion of civilian privacy. Private and civil liberties advocates have raised doubts about the legitimacy of facial recognition cameras, thermal imaging cameras, open Wi-Fi sniffers, license plate scanners and other sensors commonly used by drones in the civilian sphere.

Civilian uses of drones for hobby are already causing issues, most notably at the White House, but across the country, as well. The LA Times reported last June that while LA Kings hockey fans were celebrating their Stanley Cup victory, a group noticed a drone flying over their heads filming the scene. Angry at the invasion of privacy, the crowd knocked the drone out of the sky using a T-shirt and then smashed it to bits with a skateboard.

In Los Angeles, flying a drone in public is not illegal, but LAPD Cmdr. Andrew Smith commented that, “It was kind of an eye-opener for us, that this something we really need to pay attention to.” While the Kings fans reactions may seem a little over the top, the general population seems to feel the same way when they see a drone overhead.

With no official laws on the books regarding the use of domestic drones, the right to privacy becomes a large topic of concern for many citizens. The American Civil Liberties Union states on its website, “Congress has ordered the Federal Aviation Administration to change airspace rules to make it much easier for police nationwide to use domestic drones, but the law does not include badly needed privacy protections.”

It will be interesting to see how industries promote drone use to their customers, without raising fears about a threat to privacy. After all, customers may not always be right, but they are always the customers.

Drones will also need to be protected from cyber attacks.

“Cyberattacks on your PC – they can steal information, and they can steal money, but they don’t cause physical damage, whereas cyber-attacks in a UAV or a car can cause physical damage, and we really don’t want to open that can of worms,” said Kathleen Fisher, the previous program manager of the DARPA project in a statement to NextGov.com

The Pentagon is currently working on developing code that will protect a Boeing Little Bird unmanned aircraft from being hacked. Defense industry programmers are rewriting software to safeguard the computer onboard the helicopter drone and aim to have the project completed by 2017.

The Future

It’s exciting to think about what drone technology will bring to companies and their customers – and to people everywhere. Let’s face it, if we think we have seen the complete potential of what customer experience has to offer, then, well, we’re being naive. The new drone technology will reinvent customer experience once again. And the best part? We all get to see how it unfolds.

The future seems endless for drones. Whether you feel they are an invasion of privacy, or they will begin to make our lives easier and aid society in ways that haven’t even been thought of yet, drones aren’t going anywhere any time soon. If you need to put it in perspective, a white paper featured on Cognizant.com notes that 40,000 drones are expected to deploy in 2015, and this is a number that will continue to increase each year. This industry is ready for take-off.

drone 2

If you haven’t come face-to-face with a drone yet, don’t worry, you will.

4 Technologies That Are Changing Risk

This summarizes a session from RIMS that was headlined by Google Risk Manager Kelly Crowder as well as Google Global Safety Manager Erike Young. I served as the event host and moderator, teeing up the subject matter. We focused on four major areas of technology that are driving transformative change in the way we do things and, thus, changing risk. Disruptive technology, as the panel pointed out, forces risk managers and insurers to imagine and forecast how various advancements affect: safety; risk assessment; regulatory and legal parameters; and insurance implications.

Albert Einstein set the course for the future when he said: “The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.” Ideas can reach beyond probable or practical restraints.

Google takes that notion to heart at Google X, a semi-secret lab located in Silicon Valley that aims via research and development to advance scientific knowledge and fuel discoveries that can change the world. “What if” abstract concepts, also known to Google as “moonshots,” are tireless experiments that often fail but that occasionally produce disruptive technology. The mantra is “fail fast, fail often, fail forward.” Learn and change. Sergey Brin, one of Google’s co-founders, and scientist Astro Teller (Captain of Moonshots) seek to improve existing technologies by a factor of 10. Google began with the self-driving car in 2010. Google X now includes a life sciences division involved in bionics.

As with the radical transportation shift to horseless carriages 130 years ago, the technologies are changing risk in profound ways, but the positive and negative impact of new technology can be hard to predict.

Starting with Botsourcing and Robotics, the panel highlighted the trend of companies to utilize robots and artificial intelligence for a wide array of service industries, manufacturers, medical providers and first responders, which seek safer, more efficient and cost-effective ways of serving clients or conducting business. While more dangerous occupational risks and blue-collar jobs are expected to be safer and more efficient, it remains uncertain whether the demand for labor will continue to grow as technology marches forward. Within 10 years, more than 40% of the workforce is expected to be affected by or replaced with robotics.

One positive sign noted in the presentation is that many American companies using robotics and 3D printing technologies, are transferring production facilities from overseas back to the U.S. and creating homeland jobs in the process. New job skills will become necessary to sustain broad-based prosperity. With respect to the highly advanced robots expected to integrate into society, the panel if their cognition will ever replace emotionally oriented skills. Will the warmth of human interaction remain a value in the future?

Another area of advancement is Surveillance and Wearable Biometrics. The Internet of Things represents the embedding of physical objects with sensors and connectivity. Devices like smart thermostats, as Google pointed out, are able to learn from our behavior patterns to anticipate our needs at home or work on a 24- hour basis. Our security and monitoring systems are tied to public safety, medical providers and our smartphones. Data collection is growing at an enormous pace, effectively tracking our every move. This, as pointed out, has created concern for privacy and for the increasing vulnerability to cyber threats.

Fixed and mobile surveillance cameras have facial identification technology. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV’s), also known as drones, can be preprogrammed to operate autonomously, although the panel pointed out that current FAA restrictions require an operator following visual line-of sight rules below 400 feet of altitude. It’s expected that, within the next few years, there will be autonomous drone surveillance and product delivery systems.

Utilities can use drones to monitor power transmission lines at 1/10th the cost of a helicopter and with safety and efficiency impossible with helicopters. Public safety departments can use UAVs to assess damages as well as risks. Four U.S. insurers are currently using human-operated drones to assess property damage claims arising from natural disasters. The panel showed photos of UAVs that look like insects that are the size of a fingertip.

Wearable biometrics are much more sophisticated than Apple watches and Fitbits. Google explained the company’s quest to improve health monitoring systems. With 9.3% of the U.S. population alone (29 million) suffering from diabetes, Google sells a revolutionary contact lens, developed with Novartis, that monitors glucose levels and corrects vision similar to an autofocus camera. Other panel photos show tattoo-like patches thinner than a human hair that stick to the skin. Using microfluidic construction, these nearly invisible patches monitor EKG and EEG bodily functions and transmit the data 24/7 wirelessly. Similar monitors, known as smarty pants, can be sewn into underclothes and bras.

Exoskeleton Technologies are being developed by more than a dozen major manufacturers, as the panel demonstrated, and their products are expanding human capacity and endurance far beyond most expectations. These are wearable machines that combine human intelligence and machine power to achieve nearly any conceivable task without falling. Used by the military, public safety, hazmat teams and industries and for medical rehabilitation, exoskeletons let humans perform feats that would have been physically impossible a few years ago. Neuro interfaces with bio-logical signals allow paraplegics to relearn lost functions. Some patients can actually experience running a four-minute mile or play certain sports. Lifting is painless and commonplace with weights of 40 to 60 pounds, with new technology allowing a person to run without falling down with 200 pounds of weight on their back. A la “Iron Man,” exoskeleton suits are being designed into wearable fabrics with micro energy packs.

This area of technology has the greatest potential of protecting workers from soft tissue strains and back injuries. In addition, it serves a dual purpose of advancing an injured worker’s rehabilitation and recovery process without the inherent risk of getting reinjured. As pointed out, experts expect industrial injuries to be reduced as much as 70% as exoskeleton technology is woven into the workplace as personal protective equipment (PPE). Perhaps a bigger question, with an aging workforce and population, is the unknown cost and whether employers, insurers or individuals will bear the expense.

The fourth and final technology covered by the panel was Autonomous Transportation Systems and Devices. Google pioneered self-driving vehicles and leads in the development of its associated technology, but autonomous vehicles are now being produced and tested by a growing number of manufacturers. In March 2015, Delphi sent a driverless Audi SUV on a 3,400-mile trip through 15 states from San Francisco to New York City in eight days without an accident. Auto manufacturers are approaching self-driving features on an incremental basis with self-braking, self-parking and other autonomous safety-related features. Google has inspired a jump to a fully autonomous vehicle with no steering wheel or brake. These self-driving vehicles perform 7,000 safety processes per second at high speeds with far safer results than any human driver.

The impact of self-driving vehicles, including trucks, is expected to be commonplace within 20 years or sooner. A recent national survey of drivers indicated 44% are looking forward to autonomous vehicles. Respondents cited safety as their first priority. Their second reason was their expectation that they would not be paying for car insurance, which averages $820 per licensed vehicle per year in the U.S. Statisticians expected a drastic reduction of injuries as well as reduced violations like DUI, speeding and running red lights. With 35,000 motor vehicle deaths each year in the U.S., increased safety coupled with increased freeway efficiencies of ultimately more than 10 fold are issues that will make this a disruptive technology that will seem long overdue.

As the Google risk management team pointed out, insurers don’t know how to react or respond to the inevitable switch to autonomous vehicles. Even on a road test basis, auto insurance underwriters are scratching their heads trying to assess the risk implications.

As the panel pointed out to the inquisitive audience during the Q&A session, it may be relatively simple to determine the impact of new technology from a measurable, scientific basis. But the big challenge for risk managers is imagining the implications these various technological advancements will have on our organizations, workforce and insurers. Auto insurers have at least $500 billion in annual premiums at stake in the U.S. alone. What will happen to that revenue when we shed our need to get behind the wheel every day?

Google also pointed out that each of the technological areas cover a wide range of regulatory implications. While they attempt to notify every conceivable regulatory entity as they develop and test new products, it’s clear that there often aren’t clear legal or regulatory guidelines in place. How will regulators be able to promulgate new rules, regulations and laws as these science fiction-like inventions come to reality?

As Dr. Seuss said so profoundly, “Think and Wonder. Wonder and Think.”

ITL and its 400-plus thought leaders are providing the kind of wisdom and insight we will need to help bring all the parties together to solve these challenges. We welcome you to the conversation.

RIMS 2015