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Workers Comp Trends for Technology in 2021

One year after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, Mitchell International conducted its annual survey of about 100 workers’ compensation professionals to determine how technology use changed in the industry during the pandemic and how those changes will continue. The survey found:

Technology use is increasing in the workers’ compensation industry  

  • Predictive analytics and telemedicine stood out, showing that the industry rapidly increased the pace of adoption – or the desire to adopt – those technologies during the pandemic.
  • More than half of organizations report implementing telemedicine since the pandemic began, and respondents ranked telemedicine (35%) and predictive analytics (35%) as the technologies that will have the largest influence on the industry in the next five to 10 years. 
  • Claims providers are facing pandemic-related challenges and are using technology to help overcome them. Almost one-quarter (22%) of respondents ranked adapting to pandemic-related challenges as the top obstacle their organization faces today, and 40% said they believe the pandemic is the leading driver of technology adoption.
  • Despite the technology changes in 2020, the workers’ compensation industry still has an opportunity to introduce automation into the claims process. Only 23% of respondents said that their organization uses straight-through processing for 50% or more of the medical bills they manage.

Telemedicine had the most substantial impact (35%) of all technologies implemented in 2020

  • As expected, most respondents reported that telemedicine had the most substantial impact (35%) of the technologies they implemented in 2020.
  • Survey respondents also indicated that they believe both telemedicine (35%) and predictive analytics (35%) are the technologies that will have the most significant influence in the workers’ compensation industry in the next five to 10 years, compared with other listed technologies. 
  • The majority of respondents said the best application of telemedicine is or will be for provider visits (54%), followed by nurse case management (26%) and triage (21%)
  • Mobile placed at a distant third (8.5%). 

These findings aren’t too surprising, as telemedicine, predictive analytics and mobile technologies have been key focus areas in workers’ compensation for years. Prior to the pandemic, 32% of people who responded to a similar survey in February 2020 said they thought telemedicine would have the biggest impact on the industry in the future and ranked artificial intelligence and predictive analytics as the next most potentially effective technologies.

See also: Covering for a Gap in Workers Comp Data

It’s clear that telemedicine has been crucial in helping to deliver care to injured employees during the pandemic. With innovation and the addition of other technologies, such as wearables, telemedicine has the potential for broader uses in the industry and could serve a more vital purpose in helping improve claim outcomes for injured employees.

The workers’ compensation industry will see increased demand for predictive analytics 

  • Respondents list claim triage as the most popular future application of predictive analytics (35%,) followed by severity or reserving (35%), intelligent decisioning and adjuster guidance (24%) and claim automation (22%)

Indeed, these applications of predictive analytics and more will be vital for efficient and effective workers’ compensation claims processing in the years to come. From triage to automation, predictive analytics can help claims organizations get the right information at the right time to make informed and intelligent claim decisions.

Changes and pressures from the COVID-19 pandemic are the primary driver of new technology adoption

  • While 40% of respondents noted the pandemic as the top driver for change, claims organizations are still looking to solve challenges that existed before the pandemic began
  • Respondents rated efficiency (22%) as the second top driver of technology adoption, followed closely by cost containment (20%)

The workers’ compensation industry still has a significant opportunity for automation

  • Despite the rapid rate of technology adoption in the past year, less than a quarter of respondents (23%) said they automate 50% or more of workers’ compensation medical bills using straight-through processing.
  • 22% of respondents said they process 25% or fewer of their bills automatically. 
  • Even fewer respondents said their organization processes workers’ compensation claims automatically, with only 16% saying they use straight-through process automation for 10% or more of their claims, and about a quarter (24%) said they only automatically process 0-5% of claims.

Typically, an efficient workflow passes 60% to 70% of medical bills through without human intervention, and it is clear the industry still has much opportunity to reach this level of automation. Straight-through processing offers many benefits, including removing repeatable tasks from adjusters’ workloads, boosting consistency and freeing employees up to have more time to focus on complex claims that need extra scrutiny and care to help achieve better outcomes. 

While we may never achieve full automation of all workers’ compensation claims—unlike other lines of insurance, some workers’ compensation claims will always require a level of human touch. There are plenty of opportunities to boost automation now and in the future using rules engines, artificial intelligence like predictive analytics and more. As technologies become more advanced in the years to come, claims organizations will need to think about how they can strike the right balance and implement the appropriate level of automation that allows them to spend their time focusing on the claims that need special attention.  

See also: Optimizing Care with AI in Workers Comp Claims

Survey demographics

Mitchell surveyed nearly 100 workers’ compensation professionals at a range of companies, including insurance carriers, third-party administrators, public entities, managed care and risk management organizations, and brokers. The majority of respondents (75%) had 10 or more years of experience in the workers’ compensation industry.

You can find the full report based on Mitchell’s 2021 survey here.

The New Mantra for Agencies

As we reflect on all that occurred during the turbulent and chaotic year that was 2020, one thing stands out: It was a year of innovation. Virtually every business that survived, and most that thrived, innovated in some fashion, whether it was their business models, efficiency improvements or communications.

These innovations, while necessary to survive pandemic-related economic challenges, are all the more remarkable because the coming decade will represent an even bigger innovation challenge to independent agencies — perhaps more than at any other time in industry history.  

Due to the unprecedented volume of owner retirements, consolidations and even startup activity, the composition of the industry is changing rapidly. Agency business models are evolving. Forcing this change are customer demand, new ways of marketing, carrier challenges, talent shortages, a rapidly evolving economy and rapidly evolving technology.  

Evolving Technology Investments

The biggest technology challenge to confront agencies this past year was spurred by the need to isolate workforces and virtualize. Many agencies were forced to make unplanned investments in computers, software for managing a distributed workforce and, in many cases, upgraded cyber protection. For more than a few agencies, these unplanned investments were financially painful.  

It is also possible — even likely — that the useful life of these investments will be measured in months rather than years. This faster evolution of technology tools is likely to represent a new paradigm for agents who want to maintain their competitiveness. Agents have traditionally been conservative when making capital investments, typically expecting many years of service and utility from them. But those who want to stay on the cutting edge will need to adjust their mindset and acknowledge that instead of 10 years of service from a new investment, they may only see three. 

This trend clearly affects an agency’s return on investment, and it will be wise for agents to consider the impact on their bottom line. Agencies will need to grow larger and faster or accept lower margins. One piece of good news is that the technology that agencies need to invest in, whether websites, software or communications technologies, increasingly can be purchased on a per-use basis, or on a software as service basis (SAAS). This trend makes typical capital items, which are fixed costs to the balance sheet, variable expenses to the income statement.

One area where agencies will need to invest significant sums are web portals, websites and web-based communication. With customers demanding self-service capabilities with 24/7/365 communications access, agents can no longer consider a website as just an electronic brochure. Websites must be connected to the agency management system and need to allow customers to serve themselves directly in a variety of ways. 

See also: Does Remote Work Halt Innovation?

To meet these demands, today’s websites are necessarily more robust and need to be rebuilt more frequently than in the past. Where an agency might have gotten five years of effective use out of a website, in some cases even longer, the future will demand website redevelopment projects every two or three years.

Changing Business Models

As agencies grow ever larger due to consolidation and aggregation, the insurance distribution marketplace must grow more competitive. Agents will be forced to offer products, services and access that they may have avoided up until now, or face losing business at the margins to larger, more relevant competitors.  

Again, the choice will be between lower revenue, lower profits due to loss of business or potentially lower margins due to increased investment. This will force agency principals to focus on cost control, efficiency and sound business practices more than ever before. While technology-driven efficiency will lower costs as producers and service employees manage ever larger books of business, agencies will need to acquire new human capital in the form of data scientists, sophisticated business managers and data-driven marketers.  

Many observers expect the number of independent agencies to decrease from roughly 35,000 today to between 20,000 and 25,000 within 10 years. This trend is expected due to the factors discussed here, but also, in some cases, because of an agency’s failure to maintain itself as a going concern. 

Those agencies that meet the challenges and make this transition will be similar in some respects to today’s agencies. They will be serving clients who value the relationships they have and the expertise they bring. But the survivors will need to innovate to be nimbler and more cost-efficient than ever before. They will need to make more frequent investment in changing technology and in staff and become better businesspeople than ever before.

Technology and the Agent of the Future

Many agents see technology as a threat. Several years ago, when hundreds of millions of dollars began to flow into insurtech companies, the promise these startups made was that they would disrupt the insurance industry. The rise of online insurance distribution firms, with steadily increasing capabilities, has added to the anxiety of insurance agents. 

But as the years go by, what we’ve seen is technology that, while it may be disruptive, holds the promise of reducing the drudgery of agents’ lives. It can do this by eliminating the need for manual data gathering, creation of applications, coverage analysis, policy marketing and proposal preparation. The technology promises to free agents to spend more time with clients and prospects, allowing them to broaden and deepen their relationships, which is the most important and highest-value activity of the professional agent of the future. 

The AI Promise

If one steps back from all of the tasks performed by agents today, data gathering, manipulation and presentation take up a large percentage of the time. All of these tasks can and will be performed more efficiently by artificial intelligence (AI). 

Peter Diamandis, the author of “Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think,” says that not only will everything will be knowable in the very near future, but artificial intelligence will be able to retrieve it and organize it for us instantaneously. While this seems fantastic to some, it’s already taking place. Many insurance companies, for example, are already purchasing third party data for all or most of the underwriting information they need to make coverage and pricing decisions and then using this data to make those decisions in real time. 

One of the largest commercial carriers has been demonstrating the capabilities of AI to eliminate agent’s work by quoting business owner policies (BOPs) with nothing more than an address. While this capability is nascent, it will be expanding dramatically in the next few years. In personal lines, Plymouth Rock Insurance has demonstrated its ability to underwrite, price, sell and deliver homeowners insurance with a lower-than-average loss ratio with nothing more than an address. These kinds of capabilities are being developed now and will rapidly reduce the time agents must spend on these and similar activities in the near future. And they won’t be limited to simple accounts; they’ll also extend to the most complex middle market and large accounts, as well. 

See also: The Future of Blockchain Series

AI for agents will be able to collaborate with these smart underwriting systems and do much of the now laborious analysis required on differing policy options. When clients need service, or claims assistance, agency automated technology will handle the details. While some capabilities in these areas are already available. we will look back in the coming decade and think today’s technology is like the Model T when compared with the Dreamliner in speed and ease of use. 

With these capabilities coming soon, what will the role of the agent of the future be? I believe it will be to develop real relationships with clients that go beyond the superficial to a true understanding of the needs, wants, aspirations and fears that an individual organization or person experiences. With that knowledge, agents will be able to tailor coverage solutions in a way that is much more intimate than is possible today. 

No More Free Pass

Until now, clients have largely given insurance agencies and agents a pass on the customer experience they are now demanding from other businesses. This isn’t going to continue. The average person’s routine experience offers customized recommendations based on detailed knowledge and an understanding of their other interests. While this has been fairly simple in the beginning, like suggesting additional products based on purchase history, it is evolving rapidly. 

What people experience in other areas of their lives necessarily informs their expectation in others. For example, Amazon and other online merchants are now able to automatically deliver things as mundane as toilet paper to a consumer before he or she knows she needs it. Soon enough, that toilet paper will not only be delivered before it’s needed, but changes in brand, quality, quantity and other factors will be done automatically on behalf of the consumer because the vendor’s AI will know before the customer does what they really want or need. 

When agents marry this type of technology to the unique human communication that will remain necessary for complex purchases like risk transfer, the future will be much different. 

Some are concerned that technology will enable businesses and consumers to bypass agents and make insurance purchase and placement decisions on the basis of their artificial intelligence alone. I don’t think this is likely. It’s true that properly programmed algorithms can sort and analyze data far faster than any human. But it is only the human who can look into the eyes of another human being, judge the voice tonality, body language and dozens of other nonfactual and nonverbal cues that create and power true communication. When the agent is freed from the drudgery of data analysis and manipulation, she can focus increasingly on the human aspect of serving clients. And she will be able to do so faster, better and more deeply. 

This marrying of technology and human capability will serve to increase opportunity at the same time that it lowers costs. While this future isn’t here yet, it is close, so agents need to begin to prepare now to remain competitive in the future. The first step is to maximize their existing data gathering and analysis capabilities and leverage existing technologies to the greatest extent possible. The beginning point for that is the commonplace agency management system. Automating every agency process possible with current technology will prepare the forward-thinking agent well for what is coming soon.

Beyond the Transaction

The other focus for agents is behavioral. Even in middle market and larger accounts, selling insurance has become largely transactional, particularly in new business situations. Agents all too often allow themselves to be placed in the trap of providing apples-to-apples replacement comparisons. These behaviors serve neither the agent nor the client well. One has only to look at the real, genuine confusion on the part of the business community regarding business interruption policies that did not provide coverage for coronavirus-related losses to demonstrate the result of quoting a standardized set of coverages, instead of focusing on communication about coverage needs and solutions. The agent who ends the process of allowing herself to be treated as a commodity is the agent who has begun to prepare for an effective and prosperous future. 

See also: The Future of Underwriting

As agents are freed up by technology, they will have the time required to delve deeply into their client’s greatest concerns. They will have virtually limitless ways to provide coverage powered by artificial intelligence. And they will have the well-earned trust of their clients because of the deepened relationships that time and technology have empowered.

COVID-19’s Effect on P&C: Opportunity for Tech?

The outbreak of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and the shelter-in-place response has wounded the US economy. Business and consumer-oriented economic indicators show the extent of the damage thus far, but economic data released in spring/summer months are likely to demonstrate further deterioration. The P&C insurance industry has not been immune to the economic fallout. The downturn is likely to strain underwriting profits, and the decline in interest rates and financial markets will undoubtedly impact net investment yields, which will exacerbate the industry-wide profitability efforts. The P&C insurance industry should expect differing impacts dependent on the insurance line. The line by line policy and loss impacts are studied within this article. Going forward, it is anticipated the pandemic response and economic downturn may expedite technological change and adoption, as industry players seek to maximize operational efficiency in a new world.

The Economic Downturn

The emergence of the pandemic has wreaked havoc on consumer activity, business activity and governments. Declines in manufacturing, residential housing, trade, business formation, and retail/food sales have all shown up in April’s economic indicators. These numbers are likely to worsen with May releases.

Figure 1:

Economic Indicators released in April indicated a sharp decline in residential and business activity.

The decline in residential and business activity underscored by worsening economic indicators (shown above) forced businesses to reevaluate their operations. Many have cut costs, including staff. This process has resulted in an unprecedented spike in unemployment claims.

Figure 2:

Unemployment claims spiked in April 2020

The recent spike in unemployment is extremely alarming, and despite efforts by government and the Federal Reserve to provide temporary backstops, the impact is already showing up in lower frequency economic indicators, such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP). In the first quarter of 2020, GDP was estimated to have declined by 4.8%. Interestingly, a significant piece of this decline was a contraction in healthcare. The “flattening of the curve” was a mantra aimed at ensuring protection of the healthcare industry during the global pandemic, but an associated decline in elective procedures has resulted in significant losses for many hospitals.

Figure 3:

While the GDP decline was worse than initial estimates and undoubtedly indicates the start of a severe recession, it came in below the measure hit in Q4 2008 when GDP declined 8.4%. It is expected that the 2020 downturn will worsen significantly when 2nd quarter GDP is released in the summer. Some are estimating a 40% fall in GDP in Q2, hinting at an economic depression. Hopefully, that will be avoided.

Impact on the Overall P&C Insurance Industry

The P&C insurance industry is not insulated from the economic fallout. The impact on business activity is expected to be felt in commercial lines and the effects on residential activity and general consumer activity are expected to show up in personal lines. The effects are expected to impact the P&C combined ratio through changes to premiums, losses and expenses.

A combined ratio above 100 indicates the industry is paying out more money in claims then it is making from policies. Due to effects on policies and losses the industry should expect an increase in the combined ratio. Adding to industry stress, net investment yields are likely to decline as well. The industry typically invests very conservatively, so interest rates are a good measure to track as a proxy. Recently the Federal Reserve responded to the emerging economic crisis by expanding the money supply and reducing the federal funds’ interest rate to near zero (again). The decline in P&C investment yields related to lower interest rates will constrain P&C insurance profitability further. The duration of ZIRP (zero-interest rate policy) will specifically impact areas of insurance with longer time horizons.

Figure 4:

The industry-wide P&C combined ratio is expected to increase while interest rates (and investment yields) fall.

Which Areas (in P&C Insurance) are Expected to Be Most Severely Impacted?

While the magnitude of the impact on the P&C insurance industry combined ratio remains to be seen, the economic decline associated with sheltering in place from COVID-19 is bound to weigh on P&C insurance. There will undoubtedly be changes in the demand for insurance and the new environment will lead to alterations in insurance claims and losses. Down the road, this may also lead to changes in regulation and could even generate new business models.

Given the nature of the pandemic, it is challenging to predict all implications for insurance. A recent survey from PwC, for example, explored some potential areas of concern with finance leaders related to COVID-19 and found the following concerns rose to the top.

Figure 5:

These themes are also relevant for leadership within the P&C insurance sector. The entire insurance value chain — from policies, pricing and distribution; to underwriting and risk management; to claims and servicing; to finance, payments and accounting — will be impacted in some manner. The industry will have to navigate operational pressures as more employees work-from-home, while simultaneously finding ways to optimize profit as general business activity pulls back and the economy contracts. If premiums decline or losses spike, insurers will need to find ways to cut costs. Yet, each line of insurance will experience policy and loss effects differently. Figure 6 analyzes the directional impact to each line of P&C insurance.

Figure 6:

Premiums are likely to contract across a variety of lines of insurance as the economy weighs on new exposures and causes early policy cancellations. General auto and air traffic will decline as more people stay home. The uptick in unemployment (shown in Figure 2) will undoubtedly show up in reduced premiums for personal auto, aircraft and commercial auto. The reduction in in workforce along with movement to new work-from-home environment may also result in businesses cutting workers compensation policies. COVID-19 and associated isolation policies impacted global trade (Figure 1) and business projects, which will reduce policies for various lines like ocean marine and surety. Areas related to housing, like homeowners or mortgage guarantee, may have some short-term stability, but long-term risk as foreclosures spike. Cost cutting, particularly within small business, is expected to constrain property premiums as many businesses consolidate. Finally, medical malpractice may see a reduction in policies particularly if the non-COVID healthcare slowdown (shown in Figure 3) continues and more hospitals cut back on elective procedures and associated expenses.

As shown in Figure 6, claim losses are also expected to vary by line. Reduced business and personal activity is expected to lower losses in a variety of lines, including auto, airlines and ocean marine. Credit, mortgage guarantee and surety losses are expected to increase as the economic downturn causes capital challenges and project cessations. Homeowners may see a slight uptick in losses as more residential activity takes place at home, due to school cancellations and work-from-home policies, thereby increasing risk.

Business interruption coverage, which can be included in property coverage (for example), is an area of question. This coverage indemnifies companies for lost profits for nonexcluded risks, yet outbreaks of disease are generally excluded. Certain policies include coverage for “interruption by communicable disease.” Even with this language included, some policies still exclude contamination due to a pathogenic organism, bacteria, virus or disease. There are a lot of elements to consider with this issue. Therefore, it is likely there will be challenges and litigation related to business interruption.

Why the Pandemic May Be a Catalyst for Tech-Adoption in Insurance

The P&C insurance industry was thrust into a new business environment due to the global pandemic. Within a week a relatively manual industry, which relies heavily on face-to-face interaction, showed an impressive ability to adjust and leverage technology to continue to provide products and services. While some firms within the insurance industry had already made strides in tech-related innovation and automation prior to the pandemic, the industry as a whole has been somewhat reluctant to adopt emerging technologies. On the surface, it may seem unlikely that the efforts over the past few months may have lasting impacts and change tech-adoption rates within the industry. Digging deeper, the pandemic and the associated economic fallout may windup being the key catalyst for widespread tech-adoption within insurance.

Prior to the pandemic the stage for large-scale technological adoption within insurance was already set. While the economic downturn will lower the quantity of available start-ups and InsurTechs, the quality and adoption rates associated with InsurTech may increase. In addition, the count of internal projects for brokers, carriers and reinsurers leveraging new technologies has been rising over the past few years. Industry organizations had already understood the importance of innovation, yet had less reason to trigger production usage. Some forward-looking credit agencies understood the industry-wide hesitancy and have created scores for innovation. AM Best released its innovation score methodology in March, 2020. They explain that these company-specific innovation efforts (or lack thereof) are likely to have a long-term impact on an insurer’s financial strength. Put differently, in order to profit maximize, insurers need to innovate. In this new world, they need to do so now.

While innovation can include elements outside of technology, much of it is directly related to technology. A notable constraint to technological adoption within insurance has been lack of customer adoption. Telematics, for example, has been around for an extended period of time, but never experienced robust demand. It’s possible the pandemic could change this. In an environment where miles driven has collapsed and more customers are now unemployed, Telematics and Usage-Based-Insurance (UBI) may provide angles for auto insurers to maximize retention of policyholders. The cost-benefit for consumers to exchange private information for a reduced rate is likely to be changing as well.

One major challenge with consumer and business-adoption of internet connected devices, like those proposed with UBI, has been data security risk. There are still some concerns, but security is slowly improving and the risk is becoming more manageable. It’s likely that there’s a methodical upturn in IoT usage over the next few years, but any increase in insurance usage will be deliberate focusing on areas where security is tight. Interestingly, the large scale public adoption of IoT-oriented devices and the data streams associated may also present new insurable opportunities, while simultaneously providing insurers with an ability to further improve operational efficiency through automation.

It was shown in Figure 6 that certain insurance lines are expected to experience an increase in losses as the economy flounders. Some of the increase may wind up being attributed to fraud. AI and machine learning systems may help reduce the cost of reviewing potentially fraudulent transactions identified by traditional rule-based systems. An additional benefit of cognitive fraud detection systems is that they can detect fraud patterns that humans may overlook. This can help save insurers money in a challenging economic environment.

In an era where insurers are aiming to maximize policies while reducing expenses, AI may also be able to help. Artificially intelligent systems have been developed to read contracts, assess which areas of potential risk, and even offer suggestions on how to improve the terms of the contract.

Blockchain may be another useful tool as it emerges through the ‘trough of disillusionment’ towards production usage. According to Gartner, Practical Blockchain is a Top 10 Strategic Technology Trend for 2020. Within insurance, The Institutes RiskStream Collaborative has been working with roughly 40 P&C and L&A insurance-related organizations to design use cases for life and annuities, personal lines, commercial lines and reinsurance over the past few years. RiskStream had expected a downturn in industry participation in our working groups and committees due to COVID, yet we have been surprised to witness more participation. This may be another signal that the pandemic and economic downturn is causing industry participants to re-evaluate the need for cost savings through technology.

The timing of involvement in industry-wide initiatives may be also be ideal. RiskStream’s Proof of Insurance and First Notice of Loss solutions described in the video above, have moved through multiple path to adoption steps with members. Therefore, the associated ROI is within reach. Once adopted, it’s likely the path forged within these personal lines areas will allow for easier adoption of use cases being designed/built in other areas, such as commercial lines, reinsurance and life & annuities. RiskStream’s is not alone in demonstrating progress within blockchain. Other industries are also noticing advanced interest in their blockchain initiatives, such as MOBI (in mobility), BiTA (in logistics) and OCC (in energy). Each of these initiatives may also be of interest to insurers.

Whether insurers decide to leverage IoT, AI, blockchain or other forms of technology, there’s little doubt that firms that have made technological adoption progress have more room to withstand the economic downturn’s effects. This article demonstrated that the economic downturn will effect insurance, but also showed each insurance line will be impacted differently. The ROI of technological adoption is dependent on the underlying technology and the specific use case. While use cases for various tech have not necessarily grown since the onset of the pandemic, the overall economic environment has worsened, increasing the need for immediate operational efficiency. Insurers will be required to produce more with less resources. Optimization within the insurance industry, and business overall, will likely be more and more important in a world that is volatile and changing. Careful investment in technology is likely to be a useful resilience tool for insurers in this new, volatile environment.

***Special thanks to RiskStream’s Susan Kearney for offering your business insight and assistance with this project.

References:
https://www.census.gov/economic-indicators/

How Tech Makes Sector Safer, Smarter

The digital transformation of the insurance industry is first and foremost motivated by the demands of clients, who are always looking for the easiest way to solve claims. New technologies also can improve processes, eliminate fraud risks and collect data that can be used to personalize services.

Together with banking and finance, insurance is one of the most highly regulated industries, and any change must go through lengthy and rigorous probation. This explains the lag in using state-of-the-art technology compared with other industries.

However, things are changing, and the insurance industry can see gains of $1.1 trillion just from AI.

Here are five ways technology can make the insurance industry better for clients and more efficient for providers.

Process Automation and AI-Based Decisions

Digitization has affected most business sectors by cutting processing times, simplifying procedures and offering more power to clients. The insurance industry can benefit from all this, too.

Claim processing can be stepped up, with clients performing some part of the registration process, then letting AI do the rest. Technology can also increase renewal rates and cut down churn by sending automatic reminders or scheduling automated payments.

Underwriting is no longer delegated exclusively to people. Now it is a mix of automatically computed risks and human decision-making.

Since this industry relies heavily on extensive paperwork, any help regarding recording, sorting and retrieving information is a notable improvement. OCR and computer vision make insurance brokers’ works easier and save time.

Self-Service Portals and Chatbots

Clients are becoming more tech-savvy with their ever-more=powerful mobile devices. They are no longer ready to wait in lines at an office to be served by an insurance officer. The trend is to create a website or an app where clients can buy a policy, submit claims and evidence, create support tickets and request payments as quickly and conveniently as possible.

This should be part of an integrated omnichannel strategy, where the client has a choice of communication channels with the insurance provider.

See also: In Age of Disruption, What Is Insurance?

While some clients still prefer talking to a human agent, and this service is not going anywhere any time soon, chatbots are gaining ground. These solutions are helping insurance companies reply on the spot, thus eliminating waiting times, which are frustrating for customers.

IoT-Based Prevention

Better prevention methods could help avoid a great deal of the hazards for which insurance companies have to pay. Pipe leaks, fire outbreaks, gas leaks and more can become things of the past with the help of smart IoT sensors, which are becoming the norm in modern homes.

This is something AXA is already testing within smart homes. When home appliances are connected to a central system and give constant feedback, it becomes easier to avoid accidents by simply shutting off those posing a high risk. In a disaster, it will also be easier to process the claim because there is a clear record of the underlying cause.

Fewer Accidents With Self-Driving Cars

Self-driving cars will eventually be able to avoid collision with each other and other objects, reducing the number of accidents and saving insurance companies millions of dollars.

Until then, installing smart safety systems in vehicles can also diminish the number of accidents or at least minimize adverse outcomes.

Healthier With Wearables

Most chronic health problems are preventable if people adopt a healthy lifestyle. Some insurance companies are already implementing gamification schemes to motivate their clients, with the prize being a discount in the insurance premium paid. The motivation of the insurer here is that the cost of the bonuses or discounts is far less than the doctors’ fees.

Technology can also help medical providers keep track of the entire care delivery cycle, from the admission to long-term remote monitoring. This can smooth out the friction between hospitals and medical insurance providers, as this insurance portal development project explains in detail.

Ethical Issues of IT in Insurance

Although the consumer’s benefits in the form of personalization and less friction are apparent, there is also a darker side of using IT in insurance. Ethical issues include:

  • Data governance. Because these systems are very recent, there are few legislation points covering data accessibility and management, except for GDPR and some others.
  • Security and privacy. As with any other information systems, the problems of authentication and encryption remain relevant.
  • Transparency. Most smart systems act as black boxes; therefore, clients and staff have no way to explain why the system returns a particular answer. This contradicts the fundamental right of the client to be fully informed about the service.
  • Bias and discrimination. The primary concerns here are related to the ability of AI to qualify a specific client as high-risk and deny the client the service or put the client at a disadvantage.
  • Job losses. Reports show that as many as 18% of current insurance jobs could be automated by 2025.

See also: IT Security: A Major Threat for Insurers  

Despite the risks, using IT in the insurance sector means that there are fewer intermediaries between the client and the provider, faster service, less friction and overall more accessible policies. As the insurance tech is maturing, it’s time for providers to weigh the advantages versus risks and consider a digital pivot while it can still provide a competitive advantage.