Tag Archives: tech-savvy

growing

If Growing Gets Tough, Tough Get Growing

Successful businesses continuously draw on their strengths – and their people – for growth.

How do you describe the strengths of your business now? How would you describe the strengths that you’ll likely need in a year? In a few years? And how do these strengths translate into the skills your people will need in the future? For most companies, the answers to these questions are always evolving, as disruption increases and the pace of business picks up.

We’ve seen the recent evolution of companies’ capabilities — like fast-food chains rolling out deluxe coffee-shop menus, or utilities delving into smart home appliances.

A lot of organizations have solid processes for evolving their business strategies. But as sound as the development and approval process is, it often leaves out an important aspect: Can your people evolve, too?

Most CEOs aren’t certain that theirs can. In our latest CEO survey, nearly 80% of U.S. business leaders say they’re concerned that a lack of key skills threatens their organizations’ growth prospects.

This stat raises the question: Are some of these organizations taking their growth strategies too far afield, beyond their core strengths, in a desperate search for faster growth?

In Strategy+Business Magazine, we recently wrote about how companies that deliver sustainable growth remain true to what they do best and take advantage of their strongest capabilities—what we call a capabilities-driven strategy.

It takes a substantial effort. As we say in the story, “If you respond to disruption by changing your business model and capabilities system, you can’t dabble. You have to commit fully.”

That level of commitment is only possible, of course, with the right people to step up and deliver on your company’s greatest strengths.

Think of the potential talent issues at hand for so many businesses: How does a legacy technology company avoid disruption and commoditization? How can a fast-food chain turn up its café side of the business without trained baristas on hand? How can a utility amp up the tech-savvy talent needed to design Internet-and-data-fueled thermostats and security devices?

They’ll all need to align their talent strategy with their business strategy.

In our advisory work with clients, we are in frequent talks with companies that need to make these moves. And talent is at the top of the priority list.

Before preparing to grow your strengths, think about the capabilities in your current ecosystem of people and where gaps might pop up: 

People strategy, leadership and culture: Does our people strategy support our growth initiatives (and, more importantly, is there a strategy)? Is the right leadership development system in place, including a robust global mobility program? Will our culture support the execution that’s required?

  1. Reward: Does our compensation and benefits strategy still fit? Is pay competitive? Are there areas to be restructured that could free capital for re-investment?
  2. Talent acquisition: Do we need to pull in brand-new talent by strategically hiring from the outside or by making strategic acquisitions?
  3. Organization design and operating model: Have we designed an organizational structure and operating model that have clear links between all our capabilities?
  4. Change management and communications: Do we have the right program management structure and strategic change methods for execution? Do we know who the real information brokers are in the organization who will informally drive the change?
  5. Technology: Do we have the right technology to support the kind of employee experience our people need? Are we leveraging workforce analytics to retain our top-performing people, and are we conducting frequent employee surveys to understand the pulse of the organization?

These are just a few of the talent areas that are important to understand.

Odds are you won’t need to revamp all of them. But a carefully designed and innovative talent strategy underlies the successful evolution to get growing.

 To read more details on the strategic changes you may need to make to stretch your growth, read the full article, “Grow from your strengths” in strategy+business magazine.

2016 Latin America Insurance Outlook

Despite sluggish economic growth and troubling inflation in key markets, the 2016 insurance market outlook for Latin America remains relatively bright. The rollout of new insurance products and distribution approaches at a time of low market penetration should drive strong growth for insurers. Insurance premium growth is expected to rise by around 6% to 7% in 2016 and possibly beyond should the economic environment improve as expected. At the same time, the emergence of end-to-end digital capabilities is transforming the Latin American insurance market. This digital market disruption will force insurers to make rapid revisions to existing business models to stay competitive and build market share.

Customer expectations rising

Commercial customers will continue to require more sophisticated insurance solutions in 2016, including coverage for business interruption, cyber security, civil unrest and errors and omissions. Latin American consumers, many of whom are young, cosmopolitan and tech-savvy, will continue to push for new insurance channels and services that fit their lifestyle. To respond, insurers will need to simplify and adapt products for Millennials and sharpen their focus on mobile and social media interactions. Evolving customer needs throughout the region are compelling insurance companies to rethink their strategies, processes and services. The rise of financial technology, or fintech, companies is causing insurers, particularly in the consumer insurance sector, to reconsider their business models and increase their investment in new digital technologies. Despite a desire to avoid conflicts with legacy models, insurers realize that flexibility, efficiency and innovation are critical for success in a more demanding marketplace

Competition heating up

The liberalization of industry regulation across Latin America has opened insurance markets to wider competition. The abundance of insurance capital has intensified competition from various directions: from global insurers seeking a foothold in the region to local insurers looking to expand cross country to entrenched insurers defending their turf. These competitive trends are keeping insurance rates flat through much of the region and, in some cases, pushing them lower. The most substantial rate decreases have been in non-catastrophe property.

Pockets of premium increases can be found in areas of instability, such as Venezuela. However, insurance capacity is very limited for Venezuelan political risk, with most risks dependent on the international reinsurance market.

As markets develop in Latin America, commercial demand is increasing for new forms of insurance coverage, such as environmental liability. The opening of the oil industry to the private sector in Mexico, for example, is exposing new oil exploration and production entrants to potential losses from environmental damages. But market capacity is still restrained in key markets, such as Brazil, where only a few insurers offer such liability coverage.

Read our Market Outlook for LATAM Insurance in 2016 to understand more about the dynamics facing the South America Market here.

Training the Future Claims Adjuster

Unless you’ve been frozen in carbonite for the past 15 years, you’re probably aware that the insurance industry is facing two imminent HR crises:

  1. A Brain Drain– Twenty-five percent of the industry workforce is expected to retire by 2018, according to Insurance Business America. But wait! It gets better. In addition to filling vacancies caused by attrition, companies will have to recruit workers to staff the 200,000 new jobs the Bureau of Labor Statistics expects the industry to create by 2022.
  1. An Enthusiasm Gap– Even today, the industry is struggling to attract young talent. According to a 2012 study by the Griffith Insurance Education Foundation, only 5% of Millennial students describe themselves as “very interested” in working in the insurance industry. When it comes to considering a career as a claims adjuster, the “Y” in Generation Y stands for “yawn.”

Two Problems, One Solution

I believe new and emerging information technologies will play a critical role in overcoming both the Brain Drain and Enthusiasm Gap.

Many young people would rather view an endless loop of piano-playing cat videos on YouTube than work as a claims adjuster. Or so they think

With the imminent arrival of usage-based insurance, there is a lot of excitement developing in the underwriting sector, and I believe the same level of enthusiasm will also attach to technologies such as cognitive analytic computing. These new technologies are innovative. They’re challenging. They’re fun.

More important: Technologies like cognitive computing will change the very nature of the claims adjuster’s job – from one that requires a fair amount of dull administrative tasks to one that places much more emphasis on analysis, creative problem-solving and people skills.

Skills Will Trump Experience

In the future, we’ll see fewer claims adjusters in the workforce, but this smaller pool of talent will be trained in a different ways and in different skillsets than previous generations. Tomorrow’s adjuster will not possess – and will not need – the wealth of experience, knowledge and (to some extent) skills as today’s adjuster. Instead, new technologies will provide them with the tools to instantaneously obtain that knowledge, experience and skill.

The future adjuster won’t be trained in many of the manual and repetitive tasks his predecessor had to learn. Tasks with little or no value will be automated. Rather, the adjuster will have to be tech-savvy. She will have to know how to analyze information because, even with the help of cognitive computing, she’ll still need to analyze reams of information – data related to vehicles, collision-avoidance technology and event data recorders.

She will also have to be familiar with product liability issues. When self-driving cars become commonplace, adjusters may not be dealing with losses involving driver fault. Instead, they may encounter instances in which the vehicles malfunctioned – product-liability claims – and will have to know how to process claims with vehicle manufacturers and the suppliers of advanced collision-avoidance systems. Future adjusters will need to tap skills and knowledge that their forbears never dreamed of.

Tech-Savvy and People-Savvy

Future adjusters will have to be much more tech-savvy, even though they’ll be responsible for performing fewer tasks. At the same time, they’ll need superior people skills to ensure that customer service isn’t lost amid increasingly automated processes. Although the industry will automate many tasks, and many customers will be pleased with this development, customers are already demanding higher levels of customer service. The “personal touch” isn’t just a side benefit: It’s often the main driver behind a consumer’s decision to choose one carrier over another.

So adjusters of the future will be people who are very customer-oriented, very tech-savvy, very intelligent and very skilled at interpreting mountains of data. They won’t have to perform a lot of clerical and administrative tasks. Automation will virtually eliminate that work. But they will have to know how to optimize new technologies to deliver superior customer service and the best possible outcome to every claim.

We in the claims industry have to find ways to inspire, energize and interest young people in careers as claims adjusters. Currently, this isn’t a vocation many Millennials seek. With the help of new and emerging technologies, however, we can be seen as a fun, innovative and inventive sector that adds value to the lives of ordinary people. After all, getting into accidents causes a great deal of stress for most vehicle owners. For that reason, our industry needs adjusters who are adept at a wide variety of claims-processing and customer-service challenges.