Tag Archives: tablets

Digital Tech to Fight Childhood Obesity

Parenting in the modern world means worrying about how much time your child spends in front of a screen. Pediatricians may recommend only two hours of screen time a day, but kids actually spend as much as seven hours a day looking at TVs, computer monitors, video games, tablets, and cell phones. Study after study has linked those sedentary hours to the skyrocketing rate of childhood obesity in the U.S.

I realize that it’s not realistic in today’s high tech world to restrict screen time to two hours, especially for teenagers. So here’s an alternative: How about harnessing some of that technology to make our children healthier? The need couldn’t be more dire. One in three children in America is overweight or obese, and obesity remains one of the biggest threats to the health of our children, both now and as they grow into adults. That’s why the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation announced that it will pledge $500 million over the next 10 years to expand efforts to ensure that all children in the U.S. — no matter who they are or where they live — can grow up at a healthy weight.

Building on a $500 million commitment made in 2007, this brings our funding of this issue to $1 billion. To get the biggest impact for those dollars, we need to come up with fresh ideas, creative approaches, and new tools that will help us build a culture of health for our children, and their children. What better tool than the digital devices our children have already mastered?

And adults can lead by example, because many of us have already embraced digital health tools. There are currently 17,000 mobile apps designed to improve our health; according to industry estimates, half of the world’s 500 million smartphone owners will have a health app on their device this year. Plus, some 70 million wearable fitness trackers were sold in 2014, and people are expected to buy another 160 million by 2016.

Of course, having health apps and using them is not always the same thing. And getting kids to use digital technology and social media for health is yet another challenge. But it’s not that big of a leap from Snapchatting with friends, or searching YouTube and Vine, to sharing stats and photos about how many days you walked to school, vegetables you ate or miles you rode on your bike. Almost 95% of 12- to 17-year-olds in the U.S. have Internet access at home or school. Why not meet them in their online world?

We already know it can work. Zamzee, a children’s online activity meter and motivational website designed by HopeLab, with feedback from actual kids (and funding from RWJF) is meant to get kids moving more. Research shows that Zamzee increased physical activity in kids by 59% on average over a six-month study period.

There is a growing number of such digital health tools designed with kids in mind. The Weigh2Rock.com website, founded by a pediatrician, allows overweight teens, pre-teens and their parents to form support groups, share tips and track their personal fitness goals online. It also allows healthcare providers to follow the progress and interact with their patients online. Leapfrog’s Leapband, introduced in August, is a personal fitness tracker for children. Worn like a watch, it uses games to get kids moving and allows them to rack up points as they progress though the challenges. FoodnMe.com, a site that promotes healthy eating, has a fun SmashYourFood mobile app that lets kids smash or explode a variety of foods (virtually, of course) while learning about their fat, sugar, and salt content. Actually, this one is fun for adults, too

I’d like to see a lot more of these digital health tools for children. My hope is that developers, parents, health professionals and coaches will start thinking more like kids. Or, better yet, ask some kids what technologies and apps would most entice them to embrace healthier choices. I’ll bet they’d come up with some pretty creative ideas. Let’s start now. If you have some ideas about how to harness personal data, digital technologies and social media in ways that can help kids, and their families, get and stay healthy, please share in the comments. Because even $1 billion won’t solve this problem without lots of help.

12 Issues Inhibiting the Internet of Things

While the Internet of Things (IoT) accounts for approximately 1.9 billion devices today, it is expected to be more than 9 billion devices by 2018—roughly equal to the number of smartphones, smart TVs, tablets, wearable computers and PCs combined. But, for the IoT to scale beyond early adopters, it must overcome specific challenges within three main categories: technology, privacy/security and measurement.

Following are 12 hurdles that are hampering the growth of the IoT:

1. Basic Infrastructure Immaturity

IoT technology is still being explored, and the required infrastructure must be developed before it can gain widespread adoption. This is a broad topic, but advancement is needed across the board in sensors themselves, sensor interfaces, sensor-specific micro controllers, data management, communication protocols and targeted application tools, platforms and interfaces. The cost of sensors, especially more sophisticated multi-media sensors, also needs to shrink for usage to expand into mid-market companies.

2. Few Standards

Connections between platforms are now only starting to emerge. (E.g., I want to turn my lights on when I walk in the house and turn down the temperature, turn on some music and lock all my doors – that’s four different ecosystems, from four different manufacturers.) Competing protocols will create demand for bridge devices. Some progress is emerging in the connected home with Apple and Google announcements, but the same must happen in the enterprise space.

3. Security Immaturity

Many products are built by smaller companies or leverage open source environments that do not have the resources or time to implement the proper security models. A recent study shows that 70% of consumer-oriented IoT devices are vulnerable to hacking. No IoT-specific security framework exists yet; however, the PCI Data Security Standard may find applicability with IoT, or the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Risk Management Guide for ITS may.

4. Physical Security Tampering

IoT endpoints are often physically accessible by the very people who would want to meddle with their results: customers interfering with their smart meter, for example, to reduce their energy bill or re-enable a terminated supply.

5. Privacy Pitfalls

Privacy risks will arise as data is collected and aggregated. The collation of multiple points of data can swiftly become personal information as events are reviewed in the context of location, time, recurrence, etc.

6. Data Islands

If you thought big data was big, you haven’t see anything yet. The real value of the IoT is when you overlay data from different things — but right now you can’t because devices are operating on different platforms (see #2). Consider that the connected house generates more than 200 megabytes of data a day, and that it’s all contained within data silos.

7. Information, but Not Insights

All the data processed will create information, eventually intelligence – but we aren’t there yet. Big data tools will be used to collect, store, analyze and distribute these large data sets to generate valuable insights, create new products and services, optimize scenarios and so on. Sensing data accurately and in timely ways is only half of the battle. Data needs to be funneled into existing back-end systems, fused with other data sources, analytics and mobile devices and made available to partners, customers and employees.

8. Power Consumption and Batteries

50 billion things are expected to be connected to the Internet by 2020 – how will all of it be powered? Battery life and consumption of energy to power sensors and actuators needs to be managed more effectively. Wireless protocols and technologies optimized for low data rates and low power consumption are important. Three categories of wireless networking technologies are either available or under development that are better suited for IoT, including personal area networks, longer-range sensors and mesh networks and application-specific networks.

9. New Platforms with New Languages and Technologies

Many companies lack the skills to capitalize on the IoT. IoT requires a loosely coupled, modular software environment based on application programming interfaces (APIs) to enable endpoint data collection and interaction. Emerging Web platforms using RESTful APIs can simplify programming, deliver event-driven processes in real time, provide a common set of patterns and abstractions and enable scale. New tools, search engines and APIs are emerging to facilitate rapid prototyping and development of IoT applications.

10. Enterprise Network Incompatibility

Many IoT devices aren’t manageable as part of the enterprise network infrastructure. Enterprise-class network management will need to extend into the IoT-connected endpoints to understand basic availability of the devices as well as manage software and security updates. While we don’t need the same level of management access as we do to more sophisticated servers, we do need basic, reliable ways to observe, manage and troubleshoot. Right now, we have to deal with manual and runaway software updates. Either there’s limited or no automated software updates or there are automatic updates with no way to stop them.

11. Device Overload

Another issue is scale. Enterprises are used to managing networks of hundreds or thousands of devices. The IoT has the potential to increase these numbers exponentially. So the ways we currently procure, monitor, manage and maintain will need to be revisited.

12. New Communications and Data Architectures

To preserve power consumption and drive down overall cost, IoT endpoints are often limited in storage, processing and communications capabilities. Endpoints that push raw data to the cloud allow for additional processing as well as richer analytics by aggregating data across several endpoints. In the cloud, a “context computer” can combine endpoint data with data from other services via APIs to smartly update, reconfigure and expand the capabilities of IoT devices.

The IoT will be a multi-trillion industry by 2020. But entrepreneurs need to clear the hurdles that threaten to keep the IoT from reaching its full potential.

This article was co-written with Daniel Eckert. The article draws on PwC’s 6th Annual Data IQ Survey. The article first appeared on LinkedIn.

Unified Communications and Collaboration are Increasingly Important for Insurers

Unified communications and collaboration (UCC) capabilities are becoming increasingly important for insurers and companies in other industries in the rapidly emerging digital marketplace. To determine how enterprises around the globe are using or planning to use UCC, Ovum interviewed over 1,320 enterprise ICT decision-makers in 18 countries in 4Q12 and 1Q13. Ovum's report The Future of Unified Communications and Collaboration: Insurance presents an indicative view of current and planned use of voice and UCC tools in the insurance marketplace, based on interviews with 24 insurance respondents. Specifically, we discuss insurers' ongoing use of telephony (IP-PBX), the gap between insurers' views of employee demands and the reality of what employees want or are familiar with, and the fact that insurers realize that smartphones and tablets will have the largest impact on their operations in the next three years.
 

Telephony (IP-PBX) remains the most widely adopted UCC technology, but IM and web conferencing follow closely behind

UCC suppliers – telecoms and unified communications (UC) vendors and their value-added resellers (VARs) – need patience with the pace at which the insurance industry adopts technology. It is unsurprising that the survey shows that insurers currently use telephony (IP-PBX), instant messaging (IM), and audio/web conferencing as their key UCC technologies; indeed, insurers have decades of experience with telephony and web conferencing. IM might be considered late to the insurance scene, but claim adjusters can use this communication tool to interact with one another and the claims department in the home office, while life and property and casualty (P&C) insurance agents can use it to interact or send quick messages to clients to confirm a meeting time and place, for example.

Insurers believe their employees inhabit the same time warp as them

Our survey asked insurers to indicate their employees' familiarity with nine UCC technologies. Unfortunately, the list of UCC technologies that employees are familiar with and have a significant interest in is, according to insurers, short. Only 42% of insurers state that their employees are familiar with and have a significant interest in consumer applications such as Skype, Twitter, and Facebook. Only 38% of insurers state that their employees are familiar with and have a significant interest in IM. The proportion of insurers stating that their employees are familiar with and have a significant interest in seven other UCC technologies (shared UC such as unified messaging, UC client on smartphones and tablets, audio and web conferencing, personal video, room-based video conferencing, business social media applications such as Yammer, and team workspaces and content tools such as SharePoint) ranges from 3% to 17%. Ovum is incredulous at this. We believe that insurers are wrong, and to improve their accuracy in this area they should periodically ask their employees which UCC technologies they are familiar with and are significantly interested in.

For insurers, cost both poses a challenge and drives investment in UCC

Insurers say they want to determine a business case or identify a path toward the use of UCC to assist with decision-making before investing in it. They believe they need to overcome the hurdle of lack of user demand. But Ovum wonders if insurers have asked their users about their desire to use various UCC technologies generally and which applications specifically; we are skeptical that such employee surveys have actually taken place.

Cost is also driving investment, along with employee productivity and business flexibility. However, Ovum believes these drivers will prevent insurers from investing in UCC as soon as they should; they could even be considered barriers to UCC adoption.

Insurers believe the next three years will see a shift in important UCC developments

Looking ahead three years, insurers believe that smartphones and tablets will have the biggest impact on UCC. We hope this is because they realize the devices represent platforms on which to expose insurance forms and functionality (e.g. claim forms, quoting/rating, and new policy application forms) as apps. This will enable more insurance employees in the field, whether insurance agents or claim adjustors, to be more productive.