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The Threat From ‘Security Fatigue’

There is no mistaking that, by now, most consumers have at least a passing awareness of cyber threats.

Two other things also are true: too many people fail to take simple steps to stay safer online; and individuals who become a victim of identity theft, in whatever form, tend to be baffled about what to do about it.

A new survey by the nonprofit Identity Theft Resource Center reinforces these notions. ITRC surveyed 317 people who used the organization’s services in 2017 and had experienced identity theft. The study was sponsored by CyberScout, which also sponsors ThirdCertainty. A few highlights:

  • Nearly half (48%) of data breach victims were confused about what to do.
  • Only 56% took advantage of identity theft protection services offered after a breach.
  • Some 61% declined identity theft services because of lack of understanding or confusion.
  • Some 32% didn’t know where to turn for help in event of a financial loss because of identify theft.

Keep your guard up

These psychological shock waves, no doubt, are coming into play yet again for 143 million consumers who lost sensitive information in the Equifax breach. The ITRC findings suggest that many Equifax victims are likely to be frightened, confused and frustrated — to the point of acquiescence. That’s because the digital lives we lead come with risks no one foresaw at the start of this century. And the reality is that consumers need to be constantly vigilant about their digital life. However, cyber attacks have become so ubiquitous that they’ve become white noise for many people.

See also: Quest for Reliable Cyber Security  

The ITRC study is the second major report showing this to be true. Last fall, a majority of computer users polled by the National Institute of Standards and Technology said they experienced “security fatigue” that often correlates to risky computing behavior they engage in at work and in their personal lives.

The NIST report defines “security fatigue” as a weariness or reluctance to deal with computer security. As one of the study’s research subjects said about computer security, “I don’t pay any attention to those things anymore. … People get weary from being bombarded by ‘watch out for this or watch out for that.’”

Cognitive psychologist, Brian Stanton, who co-wrote the NIST study, observed that “security fatigue … has implications in the workplace and in peoples’ everyday life. It is critical because so many people bank online, and since health care and other valuable information is being moved to the internet.”

Make no mistake, identity theft is a huge and growing problem. Some 41 million Americans have already had their identity stolen — and 50 million reported being aware of someone else who was victimized, according to a Bankrate.com survey.

Attacks are multiplying

With sensitive personal data for the clear majority of Americans circulating in the cyber underground, it should come as no surprise that identity fraud is on a rising curve. Between January 2016 and June 2016, identity theft accounted for 64% of all data breaches, according to Breach Level Index. One reason for the rise was a huge jump in internet fraud. Card not present (CNP) fraud leaped by 40% in 2016, while point of sale (POS) fraud remained unchanged.

It’s not just weak passwords and individual errors that are fueling the rise in online fraud. Organizations we all trust with our personal information are being attacked every single day. The massive breach of financial and personal history data for 143 million people from credit bureau Equifax is just the latest example.

Over the past four years, there have been a steady drumbeat of major data breaches: Target, Home Depot, Kmart, Staples, Sony, Yahoo, Anthem, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management and the Republican National Committee, just to name a few. The hundreds of millions of records stolen never perish; they will continue in circulation in the cyber underground, available for sale and/or to be used in the next innovative fraud campaign.

Be safe, not sorry

Protecting yourself online doesn’t have to be difficult or complicated. Here are seven ways to better protect your privacy and your identity today:

  • Freeze your credit rating at the big three rating agencies so scammers can’t use your identity to take out loans or credit cards
  • Add a website grader to your browser to avoid malware
  • Enroll in ID theft coverage with your bank, insurer or employer —it could be free or surprisingly inexpensive
  • Get and use a password vault so you can create and use hard-to-guess passwords
  • Be knowledgeable about common cyber scams
  • Add a verbal password to your bank account login and set up text alerts to unusual activity
  • Come up with a consistent way to decide whether it’s safe to click on something.

There is a bigger implication of losing sensitive information as an individual: it almost certainly will have a negative ripple effect on your family, friends and colleagues. There is a burden on consumers to be more active about cybersecurity, just as there is a burden on companies to make it easier for individuals to do so.

See also: Cybersecurity: Firms Are Just Sloppy  

NIST researcher Stanton describes it this way: “If people can’t use security, they are not going to, and then we and our nation won’t be secure.”

Melanie Grano contributed to this story.

How Basis for Buying Decisions Is Changing

Building a business around speed and convenience is nothing new. Fast food drive-thrus, cell phones and FedEx overnight delivery services were just some of the predecessors to today’s Ubers, apps and same-day Amazon orders. But in most of these cases, purchase decisions were based upon simple factors — “I’m hungry,” or “We need delivery of a legal document,” or “Of course it would be nice to be able to make a call from my car.”

There were other services for which people understood that immediacy wasn’t an option. Many financial decisions took time. If you wanted to earn a little extra interest by using a certificate of deposit instead of savings, you would have to wait months or years for maturity. Securing life insurance was a multi-week (sometimes multi-month) underwriting process. Applying for a home loan with multiple credit and background checks took time. For the most part, people accepted these elongated processes and delays with resigned and good-natured patience. This was life. Important decisions required time, not only in the preparation, but also in the education and execution. Two hours with a life insurance agent would allow you to learn about all of the products available and understand their complexity, and it would help the agent to fit products to your needs. You valued the time spent learning, understanding and choosing based on the trusted relationship with your agent.

The convergence of generational shifts and technological advancement created a new mindset that rewrote expectations and priorities for many. Patience is no longer always considered a virtue. Insurance relationships are no longer always valued. Time-crunched people seek time-saving services. Value is seen in immediacy, uniqueness and ease.

See also: Innovation: a Need for ‘Patient Urgency’  

Enter the new generation of insurance companies redefining the insurance engagement. Lemonade, TROV, Slice, Haven Life and others who are redefining speed and value to a new generation of buyers … are placing traditional, existing insurers on notice.  From purchasing a policy in less than 10 minutes to paying a claim in less than three seconds … speed and simplicity are the new competitive levers.

Out of necessity, this has changed an insurer’s view of competition. Insurers used to know their competitors. They understood their distinctive value propositions. They debated on what were the real product differentiators. Insurers understood the reach of their agents, their geographic limitations and the customer and agent loyalty they could count on because of their excellent service.

While all of these factors still guide insurance operations, the competitive landscape has shifted to different factors critical to acquiring and retaining customers. Insurers are feebly groping for just a tiny bit of space in consumer minds —enough to plant the seed of need and just a little more to water the plant into engagement and completing a transaction — because today’s consumer isn’t going to listen well enough to grasp distinctive details. He or she is looking for an easy and quick fit.

A 2015 study of Canadian consumers estimated that the average attention span had dropped to 8 seconds from 12 seconds in 2000, driven at least in part by consumers’ constant connections through digital devices.

Need. Purchase. Done. Happy.

A 2012 Pew survey of technology experts predicted what is now coming true, “the impact of networked living on today’s young will drive them to thirst for instant gratification, settle for quick choices and lack patience….trends are leading to a future in which most people are shallow consumers of information.”

Only five years later, insurers are feeling the impact.

A key reason many of the new, innovative companies are appealing to consumers and small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) is because they simplify and remove some of the cognitive effort required to make decisions about insurance. In his book, Thinking, Fast and Slow, the Nobel Prize-winning behavioral economist Daniel Kahneman described human decision making and thinking as a two-part system. Greatly simplified, System 1 thinking produces quick (i.e. instantaneous and sub-conscious) reflexive, automatic decisions based on instinct and past experiences. These are “gut” reactions. System 2 thinking is slow, deliberate, reason-based and requires cognitive effort.

In general, most of the decisions we make each day are through System 1, which can be both good and bad; good because it increases the speed and efficiency of decision making, and because in most instances the outcomes are acceptable. However, not all outcomes are good, and many could have been improved had System 2 thinking been engaged. The problem with System 2 is that it takes effort, and humans naturally try to minimize effort.

See also: Insurtech: Unstoppable Momentum  

So, a traditionally complex industry is intersecting with a cognitive culture that is mentally trying to simplify, reduce effort and be more intuitive. This has consequences for decisions throughout the customer’s journey with an insurance company. Good decisions about complex issues like insurance should be based on System 2 thinking. However, during the research and buying processes, the cognitive effort to do so can lead many people to choose other paths like seeking shortcuts to in-depth research and analysis or delaying a decision altogether.

In a recent report, Future Trends 2017: The Shift Gains Momentum, Majesco examined how impatience is driving a shift in behavior that is causing insurers to look at the anatomy of decisions. What behaviors are relevant to purchase? To renewals? To service? How can insurers still provide risk protection to individuals who won’t take the time to learn about complex products? We’ve drawn some of these insights out of the report for consideration here.

For one thing, insurers clearly recognize that the trends affecting them are far broader and bigger than the insurance industry. Businesses and startups across all industries are capitalizing on the lucrative opportunity afforded by meeting the ever-increasing demands for speed and simplicity made possible by technology and re-imagined business processes. Amazon Prime, Netflix, Spotify, Uber/Lyft, ApplePay/Samsung Pay, Rocket Mortgage (Quicken Loans), Twitter, Instagram and other technology-based businesses represent contemporary offerings that have simplified the customer journey.

Retailers such as Walmart, Best Buy, Staples, Amazon and even eBay are testing same-day delivery for items ordered online. Simplifying a customer’s entire journey with a company by making it “easy to do business with” is more critical than ever for insurers.

What is the good news in the world of impatience? Insurers are quickly finding ways to counter the disparity between the need for speed and the need for good decisions. They are also using a bit of psychology to positively influence decisions, and they are buying back some brain space with techniques that both inform and engage.

In Part 2 of this series, we will look at these techniques as well as product adaptation, framework preparation and planning for transformation that will meet the demand for quick decisions. For more in-depth information on behavioral insurance impact, download the Future Trends 2017 report today.