Tag Archives: soft tissue injuries

Better Way to Handle Soft-Tissue Injuries

The most costly problem facing employers today is work-related, soft-tissue injuries, more commonly known as work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSD). According to OSHA, WRMSD account for 34% of lost work days in the U.S., as well as a third of the dollars spent in workers’ compensation and of all work-related injury cases.

Not surprisingly, soft tissue injuries — to the ligaments, tendons and fibers of the body that connect the bones — are difficult to diagnose. Standard diagnostic tests such as X-rays or imaging are frequently unable to document the presence of pain and loss of function. As a result, diagnoses are often subjective, leading to poor treatment (including unnecessary surgery and overuse of narcotics), extra lost work time, precariously high medical costs and, at times, fraudulent claims.

There is a need for accurate, timely and evidence-based diagnosis and treatment to curtail escalating costs and improve clinical outcomes, as these case studies show:

Case 1

A 44-year-old gentleman had undergone a baseline EFA. (The Electrodiagnostic Functional Assessment, or EFA, combines mutltichannel wireless electromyography (EMG) with range-of-motion testing and integrates that with a functional output). He is employed as an unloader in the shipping department. He alleged a work-related injury in October 2014, five weeks into his employment. He stated that he injured his shoulders when he put his hands out to block a fall. He complained of bilateral shoulder pain, radiating to the right upper extremity. He rated the pain as an eight on a scale of one to 10. But an EFA found no change from the baseline test.

Outcome: Because there was no change from his baseline, he was released from treatment and advised to see his primary care physician for any further medical needs.

Case 2

A 37-year-old gentleman was employed as a loader. He alleged a work injury in October 2014; when he bent to lift some ice, he felt a pain in his lower back. He complained of radiating lower back pain, into the left lower extremity, rated as a 6/10. He was referred by his occupational medicine doctor, as there were no objective findings, and his subjective complaints seemed out of proportion. An EFA revealed normal EMG activity, with chronic, unrelated pathology.

Outcome: When he returned for his follow-up evaluation after the EFA, he still had the same subjective complaints. After his doctor reviewed the EFA findings, he stated that he felt much better and asked for a release to return to  full duty at work.

Case 3

A 34-year-old gentleman was employed as a mix/truck driver. He had undergone a baseline EFA in June 2014 and had a work-related motor vehicle accident in September 2014. His head struck the roof of his truck, and he was not wearing a hard hat. He complained of neck, shoulder and head pain. When an EFA was compared with the baseline, chronic, unrelated pathology was noted. However, the comparison also revealed a change in the paracervical region. This change was consistent with the date and mechanism of injury and with his subjective complaints.

Outcome: The EFA comparison was able to identify and redirect care, away from the chiropractic care that he was receiving. After imaging studies were performed and the results found to be consistent with the EFA findings, he received site-specific, conservative care for his work-related injury, and his symptoms improved.

It is our opinion that the EFA-STM provides a book end solution, comparing a pre-injury test to a post-injury assessment to objectively and accurately determine AOECOE (arising out of employment/course of employment) status. One must base a medical evaluation on facts, not subjective complaints. When that is accomplished, proper diagnosis and treatment are rendered, and outcomes improved.

The authors invite you to join them at the NexGen Workers’ Compensation Summit 2015, to be held Jan. 13 in Carlsbad, CA. The conference, hosted by Emerge Diagnostics, is dedicated to past lessons from, the current status of and the future for workers’ compensation. The conference is an opportunity for companies to network and learn, as well as contribute personal experience to the general knowledge base for workers’ compensation. Six CEU credits are offered. For more information, click here.

Myths About Obamacare and Workers’ Comp

The Obama administration has said that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, enacted into law in 2010 and scheduled to take effect on Jan. 1, will reduce workers’ comp claims because so many additional people will be covered under personal insurance policies. But there is reason to think otherwise.

The first issue is that so many companies are reducing the insurance they offer employees or are cutting employees’ hours so much that they fall below the law’s threshold, so employees don’t have to be covered at all. Employees who aren’t covered under corporate policies or who are underinsured are more likely to make workers’ comp claims.

Here are just a few examples from National Review Online:

SeaWorld used to let part-time employees work as many as 32 hours per week, but the company is dropping the limit to 28 hours to keep them under the 30-hour threshold at which it would be required to provide health insurance under Obamacare. More than 80 percent of the company’s thousands of employees are part-time or seasonal.

Carnegie Museum in Pennsylvania scaled back the hours of 48 of its 600 part-time employees to less than 30 hours a week to sidestep the mandate to provide health-care coverage

Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell decided to limit the state’s part-time employees to 29 hours per week.

Brevard County, Florida told a local television station that the county’s 300-plus part-time employees will be “capped at something less than 30” hours to save the county about $10,000 per employee in health insurance.

Fatburger  announced that franchises had begun making efforts to keep employees under the 30-hour threshold, including some franchises’ engaging in “job sharing.”

As more companies shift to shorter work weeks, you can expect claims under workers’ comp to keep climbing.

Proponents of Obamare still say it will decrease workers’ compensation costs in several ways, including through the elimination of lifetime caps on medical insurance coverage. The argument is that these caps on employees’ private policies pushed them to file workers’ compensation claims. Really? Many of the leading cost drivers for work-related injuries are Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSD), better known as soft tissue injuries.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), soft tissue injuries (sprains and strains) accounted for 40% of all work-related injuries that resulted in lost days of work. I do not believe that these types of injuries would affect the lifetime maximum for health insurance, which is typically $1 million.

Proponents also note that a healthcare insurer can no longer refuse to provide coverage because of preexisting conditions, conditions they claim were often not covered by private healthcare and thus encouraged employees to seek coverage under workers’ compensation. While this is a good point, the National Review’s examples show that many people are losing healthcare coverage or will see it reduced, meaning that there will be a greater likelihood of workers’ compensation claims. Yes, there are penalties for not securing healthcare coverage, but they are modest, especially in the early years of Obamacare, and there is no real mechanism for enforcement. The IRS has the responsibility for collecting penalties but has no true powers to do so.

How are people supposed to afford care if their hours have been cut?  You guessed it: workers’ compensation.

The Healthcare Industry Is Ripe For Baseline Testing

We are very pleased to be able to include the phone interview above. We are able to provide this rich media content through a new, special media partnership with World Risk and Insurance News (WRIN.tv). World Risk and Insurance News is an online video-based insurance news network delivering late-breaking and relevant business-to-business information, analysis and forward-thinking programming for the global risk, insurance and financial services industries.

Workers in the healthcare industry face many risks, and one that consistently arises as a major cost driver is musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), better known as soft tissue injuries. Because of the difficulty in objectively identifying and subsequently treating these conditions, employers must now consider new options when it comes to risk control.

Patient handling tasks are recognized as the primary cause of musculoskeletal disorders among the nursing workforce. A variety of patient handling tasks exist within the context of nursing care, such as lifting and transferring patients. Nursing personnel have been on the top-10 list of workers with the highest risk for musculoskeletal disorders since 1999, and although the numbers of injured health care workers has decreased, nurses, nurse’s aides, orderlies, and attendants have remained at the top of this list since then.

According to OSHA, in 2010 there were 27,020 cases, which equates to an incidence rate (IR) of 249 per 10,000 workers, more than seven times the average for all industries. In 2010 the average incidence rate for musculoskeletal disorder cases with days away from work increased 4 percent, while the musculoskeletal disorder incidence rate for nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants increased 10 percent. For musculoskeletal disorder cases involving patient handling, virtually all were the result of overexertion, sprain, strain, or tear.

Additionally, according to an American Nurses Association 2012 study, 52 percent of nurses complain of chronic back pain with a lifetime prevalence up to 80% and 38% report having occupational-related back pain severe enough to require leave from work. The same study revealed that 12% of nurses leaving the profession report back pain as a main contributory factor and 20% have reported changing to a different unit, position, or employment because of back pain. In fact, nursing personnel have the highest incidence rate of workers compensation claims for back injuries of any occupation.

Nursing aides, orderlies and attendants incurred occupational injuries or illnesses in 48% of the musculoskeletal disorder cases involving health care patients. Other occupations with musculoskeletal disorder cases involving health care patients included licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses, emergency medical technicians and paramedics, personal and home care aides, health care support workers, radiologic technologists and technicians, and medical and health services managers.

A significant challenge in the healthcare industry is nursing home workers. Providing care to residents is physically demanding work. While the cost of musculoskeletal disorders to the health care industry is staggering, it has an even greater impact in nursing homes. Caregivers often suffer physical pain from their injuries and subsequently lose time from work. Nursing home facilities lose stability from caregivers’ absences, and residents suffer the loss of caregivers who understand their individual needs.

According to the CDC, the financial burden of back injuries in the healthcare industry is estimated to add up to $20 billion annually. These costs include higher employer costs due to medical expenses, disability compensation, and litigation. Nurse injuries also are costly in terms of chronic pain and functional disability, absenteeism, and turnover. Furthermore, this is an aging workforce (average age is 46.8 years), and there is an expected 20% shortage of personnel by 2015 and 30% by 2020. The indirect consequence is that back claims will likely increase as the workforce ages and new, inexperienced workers are hired to fill the shortage.

This is such a problem that as of April 2012 the following states — California, Illinois, Hawaii, Maryland, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Rhode Island, Texas, and Washington — have enacted safe patient handling legislation. However, prevention may not always work for this industry. The teaching of manual lifting techniques has not been successful in affecting injury rates for nurses. This is largely due to the fact that patient characteristics and workplace environment may make it difficult to employ correct techniques. In addition, even if proper techniques are used, patient weight may exceed National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health lifting guidelines.

Why Baseline Testing Is The Solution For Employers
Employers are only responsible for work-related injuries that arise out of the course and scope of employment. The employer needs only to return the injured worker to pre-injury status, but it is virtually impossible for employers to objectively document an employee’s pre-injury status. The only way the Healthcare industry can manage their musculoskeletal disorder cases is by adopting the the EFA-STM baseline test, which is an objective, evidence-based tool designed to measure the functional status of an injured worker and to identify return-to-work opportunities.

The EFA-STM Program is specifically customized for an employer’s current workforce as well as new hires and complies with all ADAAA and EEOC regulations.

It begins by providing baseline soft-tissue injury testing for existing employees, as well as new hires. The data is maintained off-site and only interpreted when and if there is a soft tissue claim. After a claim, the injured worker is required to undergo the post-loss testing, thereby granting control of claim when this is often not the case. The subsequent comparison objectively demonstrates whether or not an acute injury exists. If so, the claim is accepted for the exact injury, or aggravation delta between the post-loss and baseline tests, thereby limiting liability to only what the employer owes and eliminating the issue of paying for existing or degenerative issues. If no acute pathology is found, then the claim is never accepted. The utilization of this book end strategy allows for unprecedented access to information and allows for better treatment.

What An Employer Can Do To Reduce Soft Tissue Injuries In The Transportation Industry

The trucking industry accounted for nearly 20 percent of all days-away-from-work cases in 2011. Correspondingly, trucking was among the seven occupations which had an incidence rate greater than 300 cases per 10,000 full-time workers and who had greater than 20,000 days-away-from-work cases.

OSHA defines a Musculoskeletal Disorder (MSD) as an injury of the muscles, nerves, tendons, ligaments, joints, cartilage and spinal discs. They identify examples of Musculoskeletal Disorders to include: carpal tunnel syndrome, rotator cuff syndrome, De Quervain’s disease, trigger finger, tarsal tunnel syndrome, sciatica, epicondylitis, tendinitis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, carpet layers knee, herniated spinal disc, and low back pain.

The average cost of a work-related soft tissue injury in the trucking industry exceeds any other industry. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Musculoskeletal Disorders nationwide typically account for 33% of work-related injuries, while the incidence of Musculoskeletal Disorders in the transportation industry is 60-67%. The Bureau of Labor Statistics also noted that there were 1.4 million total transportation workers, and each year 1 in 18 is injured or made ill by the job.

These higher rates of injury can be attributed in part to several factors. Due to the nature of their work, many drivers maintain a poor diet, rarely get enough sleep, and are sedentary. As a result, they find themselves more susceptible to heart attacks and diabetes, as well as a myriad of strains, sprains and various other Musculoskeletal Disorders.

Additionally, the percentage of older workers is higher in transportation than in most industries, with the Transportation Research Board estimating that up to 25 percent of truck drivers will be older than 65 by 2025, translating into more severe Musculoskeletal Disorder claims.

These factors are contributing to more workers’ compensation claims for drivers which increase employers’ costs. As part of the job, many truck drivers are required to unload the goods they transport, leading to serious sprains and strains. Heavy lifting after long periods of sitting can increase the likelihood of severe sprains and strains. In addition, drivers often rush at the delivery site in an effort to meet the demands of tight schedules. This combination contributes to 52% of the non-fatal injuries in this industry, with trunk and back claims accounting for 70% of these cases.

Due to its unique workplace circumstances, the commercial transportation industry is at higher risk for increased frequency of injuries and costs to the industry. The following describes the framework of this dilemma:

  1. Commercial transportation jobs expose workers to high physical demands and extended hours of exposure.
  2. The transportation industry experiences one of the highest work-related injury rates among all workplace sectors.
  3. The transportation industry experiences a high level of turnover on an annual basis, which results in a high number of newly hired employees exposed to unfamiliar and physically demanding tasks.

While this is an industry-wide issue, we will focus on California in order to illustrate how problematic it truly is. In March of 2010, the California Workers’ Compensation Institute (CWCI) issued its latest scorecard for the California Trucking Industry. Over eight years, $480 million dollars was paid in medical and indemnity costs alone. The study found that, even though this industry accounted for only 1% of all California industrial claims, they accounted for 1.8% of the state’s workers’ compensation paid benefits. It was also found that medical and indemnity payments were higher than any other industry. The average lost-time direct claim cost at $18,587 is 41% higher than the industry average in California. The indirect costs in this industry range from a 2x to a 10x multiple, and in an industry known for low profit margins, controlling costs is critical.

It should also be noted that California can retain jurisdiction of a workers’ compensation claim even if the injury did not occur in that state; the employee only has to live in California, drive through California or have been hired out of California. This is such a significant problem that in 2010 the U.S. Department of Transportation initiated the Compliance Safety Accountability measure of driver’s fitness. This is specific to transportation, is publicly available, and the ratings are tied to insurance rates and letters of credit.

With the numerous reforms taking place in 2013 and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Mandatory Reporting Act, it is now essential that employers become proactive and only accept claims that arise out of the course and scope of employment. Medicare has mandated all work-related and general liability injuries be reported to CMS in an electronic format. This means that CMS has the mechanism to look back and identify work comp-related medical care payments made by Medicare. This is a retroactive statute that will ultimately hold the employer and/or insurance carrier responsible for these payments.

Should CMS have to pursue the employer in court, the amount owed is doubled. The insured or employer could pay the future medical cost twice — once to the claimant at settlement and later when Medicare seeks reimbursement of the medical care they paid on behalf of the claimant. There is no statute of limitations on compliance with the MSA requirements. CMS can review claims closed last year, five years ago, or even longer to check for compliance. Penalties and fees for noncompliance are $1,000 per day if medical care is not paid within 30 days.

Historically, soft tissue injuries have been difficult to diagnose and even harder to treat due to the broad spectrum of disorders related to soft tissue. Most diagnostic tests are not designed to address Musculoskeletal Disorders and are unable to document the presence of pain or loss of function … two key complaints.

Employers need a way to manage their Musculoskeletal Disorder exposure and provide better care to their injured workers. The key to managing this problem is for employers to obtain the ability to only accept claims that arise out of the course and scope of employment. The only viable solution for employers is to conduct a baseline soft tissue assessment in order to establish pre-injury status. The baseline must be job and body part specific and objective to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act of 2008.

The baseline assessments are not read or interpreted unless and until there is an injury. By not identifying a potential disability, employers are able to conduct baseline assessments on new hires as well as existing employees while maintaining compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act. If there is a soft tissue injury, the employee is sent for a post-loss assessment to determine what and if there is any change from the baseline assessment. If no change is noted (no acute pathology), then there is no valid claim. This proven baseline program is known as the EFA Soft Tissue Management Program (EFA-STM Program), which utilizes the Electrodiagnostic Functional Assessment to objectively provide this data.