Tag Archives: social security

Waiting for Your Disability Benefits?

If you are suffering from an injury or illness that is preventing you from working, it’s likely you have lost a livable income, and you may be facing the threat of economic hardship. Many people, who are unable to work due to a serious illness or injury, are able to receive Social Security benefits as compensation. But, according to John C. Shea, a disability lawyer in Richmond, VA, applying for Social Security benefits is often a long and arduous process, whether because you are gathering all of your medical documents, making sure you ask all the right questions or patiently waiting to hear if you qualify,.

The Waiting Period and Financial Help

Once you have applied and are waiting for a response as to whether you qualify for benefits, the Social Security Administration (SSA) reports that the decision process can take anywhere from three to five months (keep in mind that the process can take even longer if you’re initially denied and file an appeal). Waiting nearly half a year is not “financially doable” for most individuals. Here are some helpful tips for getting financial help while waiting for SSA’s answer:

  • Are You Able to Work?: In some cases, individuals seeking SSDI benefits may be able to work, but there limitations on how much you can earn. Chances are, your illness or injury may limit your ability/length of time to work, anyway. If you’re interested in working, even very part-time while applying for SSDI benefits, it’s a good idea to talk to SSA; to avoid any extra issues or confusion, consult with a disability lawyer.
  • Apply for Supplemental Programs: If your life is put on hold due to a life-changing illness or injury, unfortunately, your needs and expenses won’t take a break. Groceries and other utilities are life essentials but are often big financial expenses. If you’re running into financial problems, rather than skipping bills and risking having your heat or electricity shut off, consider applying for energy assistance and take a look at programs like SNAP for food assistance.
  • Creating a Budget and Cutting Expenses: Downsizing on your monthly budget may be one of the easiest ways to save you some money while waiting for SSDI benefits. Although you may not want to give up certain “luxuries” like cable television or your costly cell phone plan, making some budget cuts here and there may save you hundreds of dollars a month. It’s also a good idea, while planning out your budget, to look ahead as much as a year. While SSA’s decision may take a few months, you may encounter some discrepancies that lengthen the process.

Accept Assistance

Asking for and accepting help can be difficult, especially if you’re struggling to come to terms with a lengthy illness or injury. If a friend or family offers to help you, strongly consider accepting the offer. Whether you insist on treating the help as a loan or a gift, the offer can help keep you financially afloat while you wait for your benefits.

Transparent Reinsurance for Health

Transparent reinsurance programs could emerge as significant opportunities for healthcare providers, issuers, reinsurers, technology innovators and regulators to address health insurance.

The message is clear. Having to factor in higher costs associated with new entrants to the healthcare system gives insurance firms license to charge higher rates. If these new people were put into a reinsurance pot for three to five years with costs spread over all insurers, no one insurer would be unnecessarily burdened. After this period, costs for these entrants could be reexamined and a decision could be made on how to proceed with them, depending upon the deviation from the remaining population.

Several factors are coming into play. 

United Health Group indicates it will be leaving all but a few of the 34 states where it is offering health insurance under Obamacare.

A fresh Blue Cross Blue Shield study finds recent Obamacare entrants have higher rates of specific illnesses and used more medical services than early entrants. “Medical costs of care for the new individual market members were, on average, 19% higher than employer-based group members in 2014 and 22% higher in 2015. For example, the average monthly medical spending per member was $559 for individual enrollees versus $457 for group members in 2015,” the study found.

What emerges in conversations with economists, regulators and healthcare actuaries is a sense that properly designed, fair and transparent reinsurance could—and would—advance industry and public policy goals to continue insurance for all at affordable prices. This approach would represent tangible improvements over inefficient, incumbent systems. Information would be used by insurers and reinsurers, providers and regulators and, crucially, insureds to establish best performances for healthcare outcomes and expenses. Virtually everyone knows that state or regional reinsurance would have to be mandated, as voluntary systems could be gamed.

“The implementation of new policies, the availability of research funding, payment reform and consumer- and patient-led efforts to improve healthcare together have created an environment suitable for the successful implementation of patient-reported outcome measures in clinical practice,” fresh research in Health Affairs also indicates.

Risk analysis technologies could help issuers, reinsurers, healthcare institutions and citizens rein in the healthcare system’s enormous costs. Earlier this year, the Congressional Budget Office and Joint Committee on Taxation projected that, “in 2016, the federal subsidies, taxes and penalties associated with health insurance coverage will result in a net subsidy from the federal government of $660 billion, or 3.6% of gross domestic product (GDP). That amount is projected to rise at an average annual rate of 5.4%, reaching $1.1 trillion (or 4.1% of GDP) in 2026. For the entire 2017–2026 period, the projected net subsidy is $8.9 trillion.”

CBO/JCT published this stunning projection amid consensus that $750 billion to $1 trillion of wasted spending occurs in healthcare in the U.S. “Approximately one in three health care dollars is waste,” Consumer Reports says.

Key metrics should focus on estimates of risk using demographics and diagnoses; risk model descriptions; calculation of plan average actuarial risk; user-specified risk revealing and detailing information; drill-down capabilities clarifying research; monitoring and control; and calculation and comparison measures to address reinsurance validation.

Several major refinements yielding and relying upon granular, risk-revealing data and metrics would support more efficient reinsurance. All would, and could, update reinsurance information and address customer experience, trust and privacy concerns.

As the industry has noted, ledger technologies could play fundamental roles as blockchains. Indeed, blockchain technologies are just now being introduced in the U.K. to confirm counter party obligations for homeowners’ insurance.

“Advanced analytics are the key,” remarked John Wisniewski, associate vice president of actuary services at UPMC Health Plan. “Predictive capability that looks at the likelihood a patient admission may be coming is the information that we can give to doctors to deal with the matter. … Whoever develops algorithms for people who will be at risk—so providers can develop plans to mitigate risk—will create value for issuers, providers and members alike.”

Available technologies support the connecting of risk assessments with incentives for risk information.

Michael Erlanger, the founder and managing principal of Marketcore, said, “We cannot know what we cannot see. We cannot see what we cannot measure. These available technologies provide clarity for more efficient health insurance and reinsurance.”

Context: Three Rs: Reinsurance, Risk Corridors and Risk Adjustment

When Congress enacted the ACA, the legislation created reinsurance and risk corridors through 2016 and established risk adjustment transfer as a permanent element of health insurance. These three Rs—reinsurance, risk corridors and risk adjustment—were designed to moderate insurance industry risks, making the transition to ACA coverage and responsibilities. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) administers the programs. All address adverse selection—that is, instances when insurers experience higher probabilities of losses due to risks not factored in at the times policies are issued. All also address risk selection, or industry preferences to insure healthier individuals and to avoid less healthy ones.

With the expiration of ACA reinsurance and risk corridors, along with mandatory reporting requirements this December, healthcare providers, issuers, reinsurers, technology innovators and regulators can now evaluate their futures, separate from CMS reporting.

Virtually all sources commend reinsurance and risk adjustment transfer as consistently as they deride risk corridors. Reinsurance has paid out well, while risk corridors have not. Risk adjustment transfer remains squarely with CMS. 

ACA numbers

While House Republican initiatives try and fail to repeal the ACA, and some news programs and pundits say it is unsustainable, approximately 20 million subscribers are enrolled in Obamacare: with 12.7 million as marketplace insureds, with others through Medicaid and as young adults on parent plans. President Obama, in March, remarked: “Last summer we learned that, for the first time ever, America’s uninsured rate has fallen below 10%. This is the lowest rate of uninsured that we’ve seen since we started keeping these records.” Subscription ratios are off the charts. Premium increases have been modest, approximately 6% for 2016, experts find. “I see no risk to the fundamental stability of the exchanges,” MIT economist Jonathan Gruber observed, noting “a big enough market for many insurers to remain in the fold.”

Transitional Reinsurance 2014-16: Vehicle for Innovation 

One of the great benefits of the ACA is eliminating pre-existing conditions and premium or coverage variables based on individual underwriting across the board. Citizens are no longer excluded from receiving adequate healthcare, whether directly or indirectly through high premiums. Prices for various plan designs go up as coverage benefits increase and as co-pays and deductibles decrease, but the relative prices of the various plans are calculated to be actuarially equivalent.

To help issuers make the transition from an era when they prided themselves on reducing or eliminating less healthy lives from the insureds they covered, to an era where all insureds are offered similar ratings, the ACA introduced reinsurance and risk corridors to cover the first three years (2014 through 2016), in addition to risk adjustment transfer, which will remain in force.

The concept is relatively simple: Require all issuers to charge a flat per-dollar, per-month, per-“qualified” insured and create a pot of money with these “reinsurance premiums” that reimburses issuers for excess claims on unhealthy lives. Issuers would be reimbursed based on established terms outlined in the ACA.

Reinsurance reimburses issuers for individual claims in excess of the attachment point, up to a limit where existing reinsurance coverage would kick in. Individuals involved with these large claims may or may not be identified in advance as high-risk. The reimbursed claim may be an acute (non-chronic) condition or an accident. The individual may otherwise be low-risk.

The important aspect is that all health insurance issuers and self-insured plans contribute. By spreading the cost over a large number of individuals, the cost per individual of this reinsurance program is small to negligible. Non-grandfathered individual market plans are eligible for payments. A state can operate a reinsurance program, or CMS does on its behalf through this year.

As a backstop, the federal government put some money in the pot through 2016—just in case the pot proved inadequate to provide full reimbursement to the issuers. In a worst-case scenario, the sum of the reinsurance premiums and the federal contribution could still be inadequate, in which case the coinsurance refund rate would be set at less than 100%.

As it turned out, 2014 reinsurance premiums proved to be more than adequate, so the refund rate was 100%, and the excess funds in the pot after reimbursement were set aside and added to the pot for 2015, just in case that proves inadequate.

Reinsurance functions on this timetable through this year:

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CMS transferred approximately $7.9 billion among 437 issuers—or 100% of filed claims for 2014, as claims were lower than expected— and it has yet to release 2015 payments. The results for 2015 are coming this summer.

From the outset, states could, and would, elect to continue reinsurance, the CMS contemplated. In 2012, the CMS indicated that “states are not prohibited from continuing a reinsurance program but may not use reinsurance contribution funds collected under the reinsurance program in calendar years 2014 through 2016 to fund the program in years after 2018.”

Subsequent clarification in 2013 did not disturb state discretion. Current regulation specifies that “a state must ensure that the applicable reinsurance entity completes all reinsurance-related activities for benefit years 2014 through 2016 and any activities required to be undertaken in subsequent periods.”

One course of action going forward from 2017 and varying from state-to-state could be mandatory reinsurance enacted through state laws. Healthcare providers, issuers, reinsurers, regulators and legislators could define the health reinsurance best suited to each state’s citizens.

Reinsurers could design and manage administration of these programs possibly at a percentage of premium cost that is less than what is charged by the federal government today. While these reinsurance programs would be mandated, they could include a component of private reinsurance. For example, reinsurers could guarantee the adequacy of per-month reinsurance premiums with provisos that if these actuarially calculated rates turned out to be inadequate in any given year or month, there will be an adjustment to account for the loss in the following year. Conversely, if those rates turn out to be too high, 90% or more is set aside in an account for use in the following year. This way, reinsurers could participate by providing a private sourced solution to adverse claims.

Risk Corridors

Risk corridors apply to issuers with Qualified Health Plans (exchange certified plans) and facilitate transfer payments. The CMS noted: “Issuers whose premiums exceed claims and other costs by more than a certain amount pay into the program, and insurers whose claims exceed premiums by a certain amount receive payments for their shortfall.” Technically, “risk corridors mean any payment adjustment system based on the ratio of allowable costs of a plan to the plan’s target amount,” as the CMS designated.

Issuer claims of $2.87 billion exceeded contributions, so the CMS transferred $362 million among issuers; that is, a 12.6% proration or a $2.5 billion shortfall in 2014.

Risk corridors are politically contentious. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Florida) likened risk corridors to bailouts. The HHS acknowledged it will “explore other sources of funding for risk corridors payments, subject to the availability of appropriations… includ[ing] working with Congress on the necessary funding for outstanding risk corridors payments.” And, a knowledgeable analyst, Dr. David Blumenthal, noted that risk corridors are not bailouts.

Going forward, evaluations of risk corridors will demand due diligence. Several health exchanges failed from any number of factors—from too little capital for growth experienced, inadequate pricing, mismanagement or risk corridor payments.

Whether innovation can yield effective risk corridors or whether risk corridors will simply fade out as transitional 2014-2016 regulation will depend on institutional and industry participants. Risk corridors did not score unalloyed approbation among sources.

Risk Adjustment: Permanent Element of ACA

Risk adjustment remains in force and impels issuers with healthier enrollees to offset some costs of issuers with sicker ones in specific states and markets and of markets as a means toward promoting affordable health care choices by discouraging cherry picking healthier enrollees.

The HHS transferred approximately $4.6 billion for risk adjustment among issuers for 2014.

At first blush, one might postulate that risk adjustment does the job and that reinsurance and risk corridors could just as reasonably fade out. There is some logic to that argument.

On the other hand, state or regional level reinsurance could make up for risk adjustment shortfalls. In some instances, risk adjustment seems to be less friendly to issuers that take on higher-risk individuals, rather than rewarding high tech issuers and providers with back office capabilities coding claims in such a way as to tactically game risk adjustment.

Evaluating and cultivating these opportunities are timely amid the uncertainties of the presidential and congressional elections that may yield executive and legislative lawmakers intent on undoing ACA provisions, starting with risk corridors. Such legislation could produce losses for issuers and reinsurers.

Nelson A. Rockefeller Precedent

In 1954, then-Undersecretary of Health Education and Welfare Nelson A. Rockefeller proposed reinsurance as an incentive for insurers to offer more health insurance. S 3114, A Bill to Improve the Public Health by Encouraging More Extensive Use of the Voluntary Prepayment Method in the Provision of Personal Health Services, emerged in the first Eisenhower administration to enact a federally funded health reinsurance pool. Rockefeller intended the reinsurance as a means toward an end, what would eventually be dubbed a “third way” among proponents of national health insurance. President Truman and organized labor championed the approach into the mid-’50s. So did the Chamber of Commerce and congressional Republican adversaries of the New Deal and Fair Deal, who were chaffing to undo Social Security as quickly as they could. The American Medical Association also supported this third way because it opposed federal healthcare reinsurance as an opening wedge for socialized medicine. Despite limiting risk and offering new products, insurers demurred because of comfort zones with state regulators and trepidation about a federal role.

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Nelson A. Rockefeller, then-undersecretary of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, presenting a federally funded health reinsurance plan, 1954.
Source: Department of Health Education and Welfare—now Health and Human Services

Rockefeller’s health reinsurance plan would “achieve a better understanding of the nation’s medical care problem, of the techniques for meeting it through voluntary means, and of the actuarial risks involved,” HEW Secretary Oveta Culp Hobby testified to a Senate subcommittee in 1954.

Rockefeller’s health reinsurance plan did not make it through the House. Organized labor decried it as too little, the AMA said it was too intrusive. Upon hearing news of the House vote, a frustrated Dwight Eisenhower blistered to reporters, “The people that voted against this bill just don’t understand what are the facts of American life,” according to Cary Reich in The Life of Nelson A. Rockefeller 1908-1958. “Ingenuity was no match for inertia,” Rockefeller biographer Richard Norton Smith remarked of industry and labor interests in those hard-wired, central-switched, mainframe times.

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“’It’s déjà vu all over again’ like Yogi Berra,” said one insurance commissioner immersed in the ACA on hearing Ike’s quote.

Source: Yogi Berra Museum & Learning Center

The idea of national health insurance went nowhere despite initiatives by Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Massachusetts) in the late ’70s and President Bill and First Lady Hillary Clinton roughly 20 years ago, until Congress legislated Obamacare.

Innovative, Transparent Technologies Can Deliver Results

Nowadays, more than 60 years after Rockefeller’s attempt, innovative information technologies can get beyond these legislative and regulatory hurdles. Much of the data and networking is at hand. Enrollee actuarial risks, coverage actuarial values, utilization, local area costs of business and cost-sharing impacts on utilization are knowable in current systems. Broadband deployment and information technology innovations drive customer acquisition and information management costs ever lower each succeeding day. Long-term efficiencies for reinsurers, insurers, carriers, regulators, technology innovators and state regulators await evaluation and development.

Reinsurance Going Forward From 2017

So, if state reinsurance programs can provide benefits, what should they look like, and how should they be delivered?

For technology innovators—such as GoogleMicrosoftOverstockZebra or CoverHound—these opportunities with reinsurance would apply their expertise in search, processing and matching technologies to crucial billion-dollar markets and functions. The innovators hope to achieve successes more readily than has occurred through retail beachheads in motor vehicle and travel insurance and credit cards and mortgages. One observer noted that some of those retail initiatives faltered due to customer experience shortfalls and trust and privacy concerns. Another points out that insurers view Amazon, Apple and Netflix as setting new standards for customer experiences and expectations that insurers will increasingly have to match or supersede. A news report indicated that Nationwide already pairs customer management data with predictive analytics to enhance retention.

Reinsurers including Berkshire Hathaway, Munich Reinsurance Company, Swiss Reinsurance Company Limited and Maiden Holdings could rationalize risks and boost earnings while providing a wealth of risk management information, perhaps on a proprietary basis.

For issuers, state-of-the-art transparent solutions improve the current system by enabling issuers to offer more products and services and becalm more ferocious industry adversaries while lowering risks and extending markets. Smaller, nimbler issuers may provide more innovative solutions and gain market share by providing the dual objectives of better health outcomes with lower costs.

For regulators, innovative, timely information sustains the indispensability of state regulators ensuring financial soundness and legal compliance—while allowing innovators to upgrade marketplace and regulatory systems, key regulatory goals that Iowa’s insurance commissioner, Nick Gerhart, pointed out recently. Commissioner Gerhart envisions regulators as orchestra conductors, acknowledging that most insurance regulatory entities are woefully understaffed to design or operate such reinsurance programs themselves, but they will, and they can lead if the participants can provide turnkey capabilities.

Think of health insurance and reinsurance as generational opportunities for significant innovation rather like the Internet and email. When the Department of Defense permitted the Internet and email to evolve to civilian markets from military capabilities in the 1980s, the DOD initially approached the U.S. Postal Service. Senior Post Office management said it welcomed the opportunity to support email: All users need do is email correspondence to recipients’ local post offices by nine p.m. for printing, enveloping, sorting and letter-carrier delivery the following day.

Similarly, considerable opportunities chart innovative pathways for state and regional health reinsurance for 2017 and beyond.

One path, emulating the post office in the ’80s, keeps on coding and bemoans a zero sum; it would allow the existing programs to fade away and will respond to whatever the president and Congress might do.

Another path lumps issuer health reinsurance as an incumbent reinsurer service without addressing the sustainability of state health exchanges or, indeed, any private health insurers in the absences of risk spreading with readily available information technologies.

The approach suggested here—mandated state health reinsurance—innovates to build sustainable futures. Enabling technologies empower all stakeholders to advance private and public interests through industry solutions advancing affordable healthcare.

20 Work Comp Issues to Watch in 2016

In an “Out Front Ideas with Kimberly and Mark” webinar broadcast on Jan. 12, 2016, we discussed our thoughts around the issues that the workers’ compensation industry should have on its radar for 2016. What follows is a summary of 20 issues that we expect to affect our industry this year.

  1. Election Cycle

Everyone knows that this is a presidential election year. But election time also means governor and insurance commissioner seats are available. State insurance commissioners are elected in 11 states and appointed in the other 39. In the coming election, there are 12 gubernatorial seats and five insurance commissioner positions to be decided. The workers’ compensation industry needs to be paying attention to these elections because the insurance commissioners can have significant influence over procedures, policies and enforcement in their states.

  1. Viability of Workers’ Compensation

It is important for all of us to consider the continuing viability of workers’ compensation. Is the grand bargain still doing what it was established to do? There is a growing debate around the gaps and shortcomings of workers’ compensation. Our industry needs to engage in a critical analysis of these issues.

  1. Federalization

In October 2015, 10 high-ranking Democrats on key Senate and House committees sent a letter to the Department of Labor asking it to conduct a critical review of state workers’ compensation systems. Some are concerned that this is a sign we could see federal government involvement in state workers’ compensation systems.

In some ways, the federal government is already involved in workers’ compensation. For instance, OSHA has a tremendous impact on workers’ compensation. Medicare Secondary Payer Compliance is another example of federal law affecting the system.

Recent criticisms of workers’ compensation have focused on the vast benefit differences between states. There is also growing concern that workers who are permanently disabled are pushed off workers’ compensation and onto Social Security disability. With Social Security raising solvency concern, lawmakers will be receptive to discussions on how to keep workers’ compensation from shifting long-term claims to the federal government.

This is a substantial issue to watch in the coming years, and there is a significant chance that the federal government will suggest minimum benefit recommendations to the states at some point. This could especially affect states that have hard caps on the total amount of indemnity benefits that an injured worker can receive.

  1. Affordable Care Act

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) will continue to be a subject of discussion in 2016.

The implementation date of the high-cost, employer-sponsored health plans tax, dubbed the “Cadillac tax,” was recently delayed from 2018 to 2020. It imposes an excise tax of 40% on health plans whose value is more than $10,200 for individual coverage and $27,500 for a family. Regardless of the delay, employer-sponsored benefit plans have evolved over the past five years in preparation to avoid the additional tax. The formerly rich benefit plans were dropped in an effort to provide benefit plans within ACA’s requirements and often replaced by higher-deducible plans with reduced benefits.

NCCI and WCRI have both conducted studies on how the ACA has affected workers’ compensation. Results have not conclusively tied treatment delays or actual cost shifting to workers’ compensation. We believe continuing studies by these organizations and others are important to evaluate the impact of ACA on workers’ compensation.

Other issues that should be monitored include consolidation of health systems, providers and insurers. In 2015, there was more than $700 billion of consolidation in the healthcare marketplace. This is driven, in part, by the ACA, because scale and size assist providers with efficiency, purchasing power and the need to provide a continuum of care.

Another issue where the ACA could affect workers’ compensation is changing reimbursement models. Medicare is looking to shift into a value-based reimbursement model, and many state fee schedules are based on Medicare rates.

Although not specifically related to ACA, a healthcare topic to keep an eye on is drug pricing. Drug pricing will continue to be a topic within the media, PBMs, employer benefit managers, health plan experts and the political arena. Prescription drug pricing increased more than 10% in 2015, and this trend is expected to continue. This has an impact on the cost of workers’ compensation claims.

  1. Holes in Workers’ Compensation

What many people do not realize is that workers’ compensation protections are not available to all workers within the U.S. In 14 states, smaller employers with five employees or fewer do not have to secure coverage. In 17 states, there is no legal requirement for coverage of agricultural workers. Half of the states do not require coverage for domestic workers, and five states specifically exclude coverage for these employees. There are also states that create exceptions for certain types of workers, such as state employees in Alabama. Finally, we have seen from court cases around the country that occupational diseases that take several years to develop are often barred by the statute of limitations, leaving workers with no recourse for benefits.

These holes are yet one more thing that critics point to when talking about the inadequacy of workers’ compensation. The occupational disease issue is particularly concerning because it is very easy to question the fairness of barring a claim under the statute of limitations and, at the same time, denying the injured worker the ability to pursue a claim in civil court under the exclusive remedy protections of workers’ compensation. This is another area where we will not be surprised to see the federal government give recommendations.

  1. Blurred Lines Between Workers’ Compensation and Group Health

The employee health model is evolving. Employers are finding the need to provide a consistent healthcare experience for their workforce and plan members. Employers would like to find a model that provides both quality care and consistency for their employees, regardless of whether the need for treatment arises from a work injury or at home. Because a healthy workforce is a productive workforce, employers also feel that there is a need to tie health and productivity together.

We will continue to see health systems build accountable care organizations (ACO) and enter the health plan, insurance and risk-bearing arena with the goal of directly selling to and partnering with employers. ACOs are an attractive model for employers supporting a healthier workforce by extending the culture of health philosophy from work to the home for their employees and their families.

Mental health is a top driver for absence across employers and not simply a health cost concern. Mental healthcare should be as important as physical healthcare and is currently a focus of population health and employer programs. Employers are looking for healthcare models, which consider the person as a whole and offer consistent, engaging behavioral health and wellbeing programs for the workforce.

Workers’ compensation key stakeholders should be a part of the evolving health model discussions and early stage planning so as not to be left in the dark as health models change.

  1. Options to Workers’ Compensation

We all know that Texas has a unique system that allows employers to completely opt out of workers’ compensation benefits. The term “opt-out” refers only to the Texas system. Employers in Oklahoma have an option to workers’ compensation that allows them to develop a private benefit plan that replaces state-mandated workers’ compensation. It is this concept of an option that is looking to spread to other states. Bills on this issue will be reintroduced in Tennessee and South Carolina this year, and other states have begun preliminary discussions.

Some employers feel that they can provide better benefits to their injured workers at a lower cost with these option programs. Others are concerned that these programs lack the controls and oversight of state workers’ compensation. One thing is certain: This issue is not going away any time soon. Perhaps these discussions around options to workers’ compensation can lead to discussions about workers’ compensation reform, including employer medical control, increasing thresholds of compensability and reducing the bureaucracy of the workers’ comp system.

  1. Evolving Claims Model

There are significant discussions around the evolving claims model. The industry realizes that we need to focus more on the injured worker as a consumer. The model needs to focus more on advocacy, but what does this really mean? Should there be a person who assists the injured worker in understanding the claims process, or is there a need to change the culture of our industry to be less adversarial?

Other parts of the evolving model involve who actually touches the claim. Are there elements that could be automated? Should there be more specialization with different individuals performing different tasks instead of the current model where the claims adjuster is a generalist performing multiple tasks across multiple jurisdictions?

The claim handling model also needs to adapt to new technology and the way in which different generations want communication. Some injured workers prefer text instead of e-mail or phone calls. Some like to access claims information in an app on their mobile device or simply, 24/7, as they want it that moment. The model must evolve to take full advantage of new technology and communication methods.

The March 15 “Out Front Ideas with Kimberly and Mark” webinar will focus on the evolving claims model and include guests who are passionate about an advocacy-based design.

  1. Florida Supreme Court

Over the last two years, four cases challenging the constitutionality of various aspects of the Florida workers’ compensation statutes have made it to the state’s Supreme Court. The first of those cases, Padgett, ended in late December when the Supreme Court declined to review it. That case had been thrown out on procedural grounds during the appeal process, so the Court of Appeals and Supreme Court never addressed the underlying constitutional challenge.

There are three cases still to be decided:

  • Westphal, which deals with caps on temporary disability benefits.
  • Castellanos, which addresses limitations on attorney fees.
  • Stahl, which focuses on post MMI medical co-payments and the elimination of permanent partial disability payments.

The expectation is that the Florida Supreme Court will address all of these cases in 2016, but nobody knows when that will occur.

  1. Bureaucracy

Workers’ compensation is one of the most highly regulated lines of insurance, and regulators are increasingly aggressive in pursuing fines and penalties. Every form filed and every payment transaction is an opportunity for a penalty. EDI allows regulators to automate the fines and penalties. Some states perform retrospective audits on activity five to 10 years in the past. The IMR process in California adds administrative cost to claims without necessarily improving outcomes, and states with self-imposed penalties may be driving up the cost of doing business beyond the benefit of the penalty payment. Lobbying is becoming an increasingly important area for payers and service providers to consider.

The significant costs associated with the bureaucracy of workers’ compensation regulations are not improving the outcomes on claims. Most of the money collected from the fines and penalties is paid to the states. The programs may cover the operating costs of state workers’ compensation division and not be paid to the injured worker or medical provider.

This topic is an important issue to watch in 2016 and will be the topic of our Feb. 9 “Out Front Ideas with Kimberly and Mark” webinar.

  1. Regulatory Change

There are four states in particular that we should be keeping an eye on in terms of potential regulatory reforms in 2016:

New York

Employers in New York are continuing to push for additional workers’ compensation reforms to reduce their costs because the savings projected with the last round of reforms never fully materialized. Whether there is enough momentum to get a bill through this year remains to be seen, but the efforts are there.

Florida

In Florida, the situation is going to depend on what the state Supreme Court does with the cases mentioned earlier. If any of those cases punch holes in the constitutionality of the workers’ compensation law, then the legislature is going to need to address this. Again, this is a waiting game.

Illinois

Illinois Gov. Rauner has made it a priority to enact workers’ compensation reforms to reduce employer costs. But his efforts have been blocked by the state legislature, and there is a budget stalemate in the state. There has been much political back-and-forth on this budget and the workers’ compensation reforms. It remains to be seen if the governor has the political muscle to get his legislation passed.

California

Ever since the Schwarzenegger workers’ compensation reforms in 2004, and continuing with SB 863 passed by Gov. Brown, the California legislature has been trying to undermine these workers’ compensation reforms. Every year, multiple bills are passed by the legislature, and every year both Gov. Schwarzenegger and Gov. Brown have vetoed those bills. Gov. Brown is committed to preserving his workers’ compensation reforms, and there are three years left on his term. Once he is gone, there is concern about what could happen with workers’ compensation in California. But, for now, significant change is not expected.

  1. Talent Acquisition

Talent acquisition and retention is probably the biggest issue facing the entire insurance industry. Consider:

  • 25% of insurance industry workforce will retire by 2018 (McKinsey)
  • There are 2.3 million workers in the insurance industry. More than 1 million will retire in the next 10 years, and 400,000 positions will be left open by 2020 (Deloitte and Jackson Group)
  • Workers over the age of 45 represent 48% of the insurance workforce

Are we doing enough with colleges to show the career opportunities in the insurance industry? Although more colleges and universities are offering risk management programs, the reality is that there are very few of these programs nationwide. Our industry needs to support these programs with both grants and internship opportunities.

In workers’ compensation, we need to be looking at the role of the examiner. Are there tasks that we could automate and reduce workload need? Millennials say they want to work with purpose. The role of the claims adjuster is to assist injured workers in their recovery. Could we be doing more to highlight the positive aspects of the claims adjuster role to make it more attractive to millennials?

We also need to be looking at ways to be flexible with work schedules and at whether someone is tied to the home office or able to work from a remote location. Finally, we need to continue to focus on promoting diversity and inclusion within our workforce.

In May, we will be doing an “Out Front Ideas with Kimberly and Mark” webinar devoted to this topic.

  1. Market Conditions

You cannot forecast the coming year for the workers’ compensation industry without talking about rates. Recently, for the first time in years, the Fed increased interest rates. This is good news, but the change is still insignificant and will not have a material impact on the workers’ comp industry. Because investment opportunities are limited for carriers, they continue to be very diligent with their underwriting. What does this mean for rates? Right now, the market is relatively stable. Accounts with good loss histories could see steady to slightly decreased rates, while accounts with poor loss histories will likely see slight increases. Overall, significant rate changes across the nation are not expected in the coming year.

  1. Predictive Analytics

Predictive analytics have been a buzz word in our industry for a number of years. Most data models identify at-risk claims, which may benefit from additional intervention in terms of nurse case management or a more skilled adjuster. The goal of the intervention(s) is to change the trajectory of the claim, to do something different than in similar prior claims, so the result is improved over the past experience. Although most payers reflect having predictive analytics and a variety of models available, there are limited published results on the outcome and effectiveness. Watch in 2016 to see if organizations begin sharing outcomes as a way to market their business or provide industry thought leadership on what is working and should be considered to drive success.

There is a need to evolve predictive analytics and big data models so that some human tasks are automated. Instead of just identifying cases where intervention is necessary, we should also identify claims where minimal intervention is needed. This approach frees resources and allows attention on claims, which will benefit from the touch. Future claims models will benefit from analytics using learning models similar to IBM Watson-type smart analytics.

  1. OSHA

OSHA continues to be a challenge for employers. Going into 2016, OSHA has increased reporting and recordkeeping requirements. It is also increasing its focus on certain industries, including healthcare, and employers are seeing a significant increase in fines. This is an area that is constantly evolving.

Our April 5 “Out Front Ideas with Kimberly and Mark” webinar will focus on these continuing developments and discuss the continuing issues that employers should track.

  1. Utilization Review

There is industry buzz and sidebar conversations around utilization review (UR) and the current approach deployed by employers, payers and service providers. Physicians are asking more than ever how they can help streamline treatment requests, obtain decision outcomes electronically and more quickly and provide timely, appropriate care for patients.

Utilization review should ensure that injured workers receive appropriate care within the right setting and for the correct duration. But what is the right UR model? Should all treatment be subject to UR or select treatment requests? Is UR a process strictly addressing the request for treatment and medical documentation submitted against guidelines of care or collaborative with adjusters, providers and the injured workers? Are denials of care driving up litigation unnecessarily? Do utilization review referral triggers change if the physician providing care is part of a high-performance network or known to be a top-performing physician? These are questions being raised by industry veterans and newcomers alike and are likely worthy of a review and further dialogue.

In the consumer-driven health world where we find ourselves, there is greater interest from injured workers to understand treatment options and outcomes. If not a part of UR, is your case management or claim model providing medical treatment option education, inclusive of outcomes awareness? Transparency is becoming increasingly important to consumers.

  1. Exclusive Remedy

Plaintiff attorneys are always trying to find ways around the exclusive remedy protections of workers’ compensation, and these efforts are becoming increasingly successful. In early January 2016, the District Court of Appeals in California allowed an injured worker to pursue a civil claim against a utilization review provider because the provider failed to warn him about the potential risks of medication withdrawal.

More and more, judges are allowing such litigation to survive a motion to dismiss on summary judgement because of workers’ compensation exclusive remedy protections. This creates enormous costs for employers and carriers, which then must spend hundreds of thousands of dollars or more defending such lawsuits and face the risk of a jury award that could be worth millions. In addition, an employer’s liability award based on the “intentional actions” of the employer may have issues with insurance coverage. The entire industry should be paying close attention to this area of increased litigation around exclusive remedy.

  1. ICD-10

The ICD-10 medical classification came along last year with a lot of hype and a significant amount of work effort to update systems and train teams. There was concern that the new diagnosis codes would result in slowed claims processes and treatment decisions. Thus far, workers’ compensation key stakeholders report little to no impact from the change. This may be because states did not mandate the use of ICD-10 for workers’ compensation and most organizations continue to accept ICD-9. Bill review receipt to pay timeframes have not lengthened, and e-billing rejections did not increase, which were two areas to watch after the ICD-10 go-live.

In 2019, Medicare plans to roll out an incentive-based reimbursement model tied to patient outcomes (MACRA). The American Medical Association believes this will be a significant reimbursement change for physicians. Changes to Medicare reimbursement could impact workers’ compensation because some state fee schedules are Medicare based.

History has proven Medicare does not always follow through with what it says it is going to do in terms of changing reimbursement models, but the MACRA implementation is an issue worth monitoring.

  1. Marijuana

Thus far, New Mexico has been the only state allowing medical marijuana for treatment under workers’ compensation. But as the use of medical marijuana spreads, it is inevitable that we will see other states take on this issue. The answer is simple –if states put something in their statutes barring medical marijuana under workers’ compensation, then that solves the problems. Some medical marijuana states have already indicated that insurance is not responsible covering medical marijuana. State legislators and regulators can stop this before it becomes a legitimate problem.

The bigger issue is employment practice concerns. Many expect the federal government to reclassify marijuana as a Schedule 2 drug, possibly by the end of this current administration. Once that happens, it will no longer be an “illegal” drug. Employers are going to need to adapt and drug test for impairment rather than just testing the presence of the drug. Standards are going to need to be developed on what constitutes “impairment” with marijuana. The science needs to catch up with the realities of this new normal when it comes to marijuana in the U.S.

  1. On-Demand Economy

The on demand economy is creating new concerns about what constitutes an employee/employer relationship. Is an Uber driver an employee of Uber or an independent contractor? What about a repair person you hire through Angie’s List?

While the on-demand economy is a newer dynamic, determining what constitutes independent contractor vs. an employee has been a challenge for the workers’ compensation industry for many years. In July 2015, the Department of Labor issued an interpretive memorandum indicating that the DOL feels “most workers classified as independent contractors are employees under the Fair Labor Standards Act’s broad definitions.”

So perhaps the issue to watch here is not so much the on-demand economy, but instead whether we are going to see the Department of Labor push for fewer and fewer workers to be classified as independent contractors. This could have a significant impact on many industries as well as significantly changing the business model of services like Uber and Lyft.

The State of Cyber Insurance

Cyber attacks are escalating in their frequency and intensity and pose a growing threat to the business community as well as the national security of countries. High-profile cyber incidents in 2014 reflected the expanding spectrum of cyber threats, from point-of-sale (POS) breaches against customer accounts to targeted denial-of-service (DoS) attacks meant to disable a company’s network. Businesses in ever-greater numbers sought financial protection through insurance, buying coverage for losses from data breaches and business outages.

Boost in Cyber Insurance Demand Drives Insurers’ Response

Healthcare facilities, universities and schools continue to be on cybercriminals’ radar, but attacks in the hospitality and gaming, power and utilities and other sectors reveal that no organization is immune to a cyber attack or failure of technology.

Healthcare and education clients had the highest cyber insurance take-up rates in 2014, followed by hospitality and gaming and services. Universities and schools present attractive targets because they house a vast array of personal information of students, parents, employees, alumni and others: Social Security numbers, healthcare information, financial data and research papers can all be compromised.

The broader scope of hacktivists contributed to the increase in cyber insurance purchases in 2014. Sectors that again showed notable year-over-year increases in the number of clients purchasing cyber coverage included hospitality and gaming and education. Other areas that stood out in 2014 included the power and utilities sector, with more clients buying standalone cyber coverage. Power and utilities companies frequently cite the risks and vulnerabilities associated with the use of supervisory control and data acquisition networks — which control remote equipment — and the cost of regulatory investigations as driving factors behind their cyber coverage purchases.

The reasons for purchasing cyber coverage vary from board mandates seeking to protect corporate reputations to companies looking to mitigate potential revenue loss from cyber-induced interruptions of operations. Insurers responded to this demand by offering broader cyber insurance coverage in 2014, including coverage for contingent business interruption and cyber-induced bodily injury and property damages. They also expanded availability of loss-control services, including risk-assessment tools, breach counseling and event response assistance.

Cyber Limits Rise

Companies with revenues of more than $1 billion have increased their cyber insurance limits worldwide by 42% on average since 2012, according to Marsh Global Analytics estimates. Over the same time period, healthcare companies have bought 178% more cyber insurance, and power and utilities firms have expanded their coverage by 98%.

Rising spending on cyber insurance

Source: Marsh Global Analytics. Percentage increase in spending by companies with more than $1 billion in revenues on cyber-risk insurance from 2012 through 2014.

Cyber Rates and Coverage

Increases in the frequency and severity of losses and near-constant headlines about attacks and outages kept cyber insurance premiums generally volatile in 2014. Average rate increases at renewal for both primary layers and total programs were lower in the fourth quarter than in the first. The increased loss activity prompted pricing challenges for some insureds, particularly retailers, where renewal rates rose 5% on average and as much as 10% for some clients.

Market capacity also varied according to industry. Most industries were able to secure cyber coverage with aggregate limits in excess of $200 million, while the most targeted industries, like retailers and financial institutions, faced a challenging market.

Insureds also face heightened due diligence from underwriters seeking to drill down beyond simple reviews of the company’s general information security policies. For example, insureds in the retail sector are being asked about their deployment of encryption and EMV (credit card) technology. And all insureds are now routinely asked whether they have formal incident response plans in place that outline procedures for protecting data and vendor networks and, more importantly, if such plans have been tested.

A Growing Concern

In 2015, managing cyber risk is clearly a top priority for organizations. For example, business interruption (BI) drew a lot of attention in 2014, a trend likely to continue throughout 2015. While BI has historically been thought of as the effect of a critical system going down for an extended period, technology failures and cyber attacks can create far-reaching outages affecting secondary systems, clients and even vendors. Such events can also lead to higher recovery costs, which are becoming a concern for boards of directors and senior management.

There is also concern stemming from the expansion of regulation and litigation. Regulators were active in policing cyber risks in 2014, and oversight is likely to expand significantly in coming years. With cyber risk seen as a critical issue on both sides of the aisle in Washington, D.C., companies will face regulatory challenges in 2015 and beyond.

Sectors that have already seen significant regulatory activity — for example, healthcare, financial services and education — will likely face more stringent regulations and larger fines. All industries should pay attention to existing and impending regulations, tighten controls and prepare to present and defend their compliance regime. Civil litigation in the wake of a breach or disclosure of a cyber event also escalated in 2014, with class actions at times following the disclosure of a breach by mere hours.

As demand for cyber insurance grows, remember that risk transfer is only part of the solution. Enhanced information sharing between industry and government is another step toward having a comprehensive risk-mitigation strategy. Insurers and brokers are expanding the availability of loss-prevention and risk-mitigation services such as risk-assessment tools, breach preparation counseling and breach response assistance. The expanded roster of services and enhanced coverage can provide additional value from policies, usually without a specific added premium.

Was Your Data Taken in Experian Breach?

A breach to one of Experian‘s servers – discovered on Sept. 15 – has resulted in 15 million compromised records with personal information like names and Social Security numbers. The breach included information about T-Mobile customers from as far back as 2013. Here are the details and action steps you can take if you think you’re a victim.

The server that was attacked housed records of those who applied for T-Mobile’s services between Sept. 1, 2013, and Sept. 16, 2015. Overall, the compromised information included…

  • Names
  • Addresses
  • Dates of birth
  • Driver’s license numbers
  • Social Security numbers
  • Passport IDs

The affected server was not part of Experian’s consumer credit bureau; nevertheless, a data breach is good reason to check your defenses when it comes protecting your personal information, and there are plenty of ways you can protect yourself.

Make sure hackers didn’t steal your information and use it for their advantage. Annually check your credit reports and bank statements for suspicious activity, like a new line of credit or purchases you didn’t make.

Be cautious! When a breach like this occurs, fraudsters may call the victims and say they’re from the affected companies. They may ask you for your personal information, so they can “help” you. Keep in mind that T-Mobile and Experian made it clear that they will not send a message or call and ask for personal information connected with the incident.

Consider some of the major data breaches we’ve had in the past couple years:

  • JP Morgan Chase – 76 million customer records
  • Anthem – 87.6 million
  • Home Depot – 56 million
  • Target – 110 million

Whether or not you think you’re a victim, employing an identity theft protection plan is relevant and important.

Ironically, T-Mobile is offering resolution services through Experian’s ProtectMyID, for those who were affected by the data breach; however, full, continuing coverage demands an identity protection service that has more robust features than those provided through the complimentary membership.

ProtectMyID’s complimentary membership includes SSN and credit-card monitoring, but you also need monitoring for high-risk transactions and data sweeps. ProtectMyID includes credit monitoring and an Experian credit report upon entry, but you also need your credit score and identity risk score (showing how vulnerable you are to identity theft). ProtectMyID has lost wallet/purse assistance and alerts for suspicious activity, which is good. It is backed by $1 million identity theft insurance coverage, too, but you also need coverage that will reimburse you for the expenses you incur while returning your life to normal. ProtectMyID has fraud resolution agents who can offer assistance to victims, but you also need a financial consultation, a legal consultation and more.

You need stronger layers of protection against identity theft, help creating an action plan and professional assistance with addressing compromised information and accounts.

The Experian data breach is a big reminder of how a robust identity theft protection plan is absolutely necessary.