Tag Archives: self-funding

Why to Self-Fund Health Benefits

The passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010 continues to redefine the employer-sponsored healthcare market. Increased regulatory and fiduciary responsibilities, employer mandates and rising medical premiums have forced employers to evaluate all cost-effective strategies for providing health benefits to employees. One strategy, self-funding, remains an attractive alternative to the traditional fully insured and association-style health plans.

In a self-funded environment, the employer will assume the role of the insurer and agree to pay the medical claims incurred by the plan’s members and dependents. A good percentage of self-funded plans will also use reinsurance and captive risk tools to provide protection from both large individual claims and the plan’s collective utilization.

While self-funding has gained momentum as a result of healthcare reform, it is not a new concept. In 1999, a Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) study reported that 44% of employer-sponsored healthcare was self-funded. That number has now reportedly grown to 61% in 2014.

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Why Is Everyone So Interested?

Health benefits continue to be one of the greatest expenses for employers. This fact, compounded with the continual rate increases (with little to no justification), leaves employers feeling stuck in an endless cycle. Some also may feel that their employees are a generally healthy group that is a good candidate to self-fund.

Many turn to self-funding because of:

  • Lower fixed costs-The majority of the expense is incurred in the payment of actual medical claims, increasing the margin for savings when the plan performs well.
  • Improved transparency-An increase in premiums is easier to swallow if the employer can get an accurate understanding of its claims experience. Self-funded health plans provide employers with a tremendous amount of data. Accurate claims data strengthens the group’s ability to effectively control spending on claims.
  • Control of the plan design-Self-funded health plans are in a better position to adjust benefits and control increased provider costs. Unlike fully insured products, a self-funded plan design can be structured to meet the specific needs of the group and not an insurer’s overall population.
  • Tax savings-Fully insured premiums continue to jump to accommodate new provisions as a result of the ACA. Self-funded plan sponsors avoid items like the new Health Insurance Industry Tax, which will increase from 2% to 5% in coming years.

With the increased interest comes new strategies and opportunities as the self-funding marketplace evolves. Self-funded plan sponsors are reaping the benefits of evolving provider network and cost containment strategies. Meanwhile, employers that have yet to make the transition see obstacles lessen because of changes in the reinsurance and captive markets.

What Does This Mean for Employer Groups?

Self-Funded Feasibility Studies Are a Must

There is a strong likelihood that every corporation or public entity with 1,000 employees or more has at least heard about self-funding. However, depending on the number of employees on your health plan, it is quite possible that you have not evaluated self-funding, at least in a thorough way.

A deeper look into the composition of employers participating shows us that group size typically has a direct correlation on whether a self-funded strategy is being used. According to the 2014 KFF study, the breakdown of corporations self-funding is:

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Historically, size has mattered. While all groups with more than 200 employees have a responsibility to evaluate the method as an alternative, those employer groups in the less-than-200 range are seeing more opportunity to make the transition. Lessening participation thresholds to lease competitive provider networks and new reinsurance and captive products are creating total-cost scenarios where the right employer can realize the advantages of self-funding. It can still be a challenge when certain market dynamics are present (i.e., lack of claims data, available provider network options, pending legislative actions, etc.), but more and more companies are finding success.

One More Step

The large insurance companies have noticed the changing market, as well, of course, and have introduced a number of bundled plans that look like self-funding. These products are typically entirely owned by one entity, like an insurance company or trust, and allow the employer to participate in a pre-determined portion of any surplus when the group experiences lower-than-expected claims. These products are attractive because they pull together under one brand all the component vendors of a self-funded health plan (i.e., claims administrator, network, reinsurance, etc.). These products can be a great first step for employers weary of self-funding through their own independent health plan. The products will allow them to gain insight into their claims performance while alleviating some of the additional work associated with the wholly owned approach.

For those groups already in these products, it may be time to evaluate taking that next step and realizing the benefits of a wholly owned approach. Reinsurance policies with specific advance and monthly aggregate accommodation can give these employers the ability to still limit their maximum exposure, lower their plan’s fixed costs and keep all of the savings when the plan performs well.

With the tools available today, any employer group in a packaged, shared funded or full ASO model plan is a candidate to complete the transition to a self-funded plan. While the packaged, branded approaches employed by some of the major insurance companies may work for a season, deconstructing the bundled product may be the next step in the employer’s long-term strategy.

Fine-Tuning Your Self-Funded Plan

There are many companies that have been enjoying the benefits of self-funding for years. As a result of the ACA, however, these employers have had to react to escalating medical costs, expensive specialty drugs and increased regulatory and fiduciary responsibilities.

For instance, self-funded health plans typically “lease” provider networks from a large insurance company. But, in 2010, the ACA removed lifetime and annual maximums from health plans, and the number of high-dollar claims has increased substantially. The networks provide discounts on fees, but the question is how important they are given the increasingly large charges they are being applied toward.

Self-funded health plans are adept in using different types of analytics both to measure historical data and to predict outcomes. This has empowered these health plans to fine tune their plans and integrate various cost-containment strategies.

Built For Reform: Third Party Administrators And The Affordable Care Act

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is considered the most significant, albeit poorly written, law that Congress has passed in the last 50 years. As regulators devise the details needed for the law to be fully implemented, unprecedented new administrative and compliance burdens are looming for employers. Independent Third Party Administrators (TPAs) have decades of experience guiding employers through the pitfalls of government rules and requirements. This expertise makes independent Third Party Administrators invaluable to employers trying to mitigate the impact of health care reform.

A Brief History Of The Third Party Administrator Industry
Most employee benefit plans are highly technical and difficult to administer. Those complexities gave birth to the Third Party Administrator industry.

While there are reports of a Third Party Administrator operating as early as 1933, the modern Third Party Administrator concept is rooted in servicing mostly pension plans codified in the 1946 Federal Taft-Hartley Act. Such plans are typically comprised of several employers whose employees belong to a single union.

By the late 1950s, there were also a few Third Party Administrators specializing in servicing medical plans sponsored by single employers. The industry boomed after the enactment of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as employers began exploring the option of self-funding when traditional insurance coverage failed to meet their cost expectations. Today, the administration of self-funded medical plans is the primary line of business for many independent Third Party Administrators.

Employers that self-fund assume the financial risk of paying claims for expenses incurred under the plan. Medical, dental, vision, and short-term disability plans, as well as Health Reimbursement Arrangements (HRAs), can all be part of a self-funded program.

Most employers sponsoring self-funded medical plans purchase stop loss coverage to limit their risk. An insurance carrier becomes liable for the claims that exceed certain pre-determined dollar limits.

The Value Of A Third Party Administrator-Administered Self-Funded Program
Employers can choose to administer their self-funded plans in-house. However, few have the experience to do it well. Considering the heavy penalties for regulatory non-compliance, self-administration is generally ill-advised.

Some insurance carriers offer Administrative Services Only (ASO) contracts to employers that wish to self-fund but rely on the carrier to do the paperwork. Unfortunately, most insurance carriers have benefit administration systems that are too inflexible to accommodate the unique plan designs that are the hallmark of self-funding. In addition, they are more attuned to the legal requirements applicable to fully insured products, which differ dramatically from those for self-funded plans.

Insurance carriers may assume financial risk under an Administrative Services Only contract by providing the stop loss coverage. Conversely, Third Party Administrators are not risk-taking entities so they are clearly in a position to act in the best interest of the plan and its members.

The independent Third Party Administrator industry was built on change. Never having settled for the “one-size-fits-all” approach of the fully insured model, independent Third Party Administrators maintain sophisticated information technologies that adapt easily to new demands, as well as professional staff accustomed to responding to regulations that continually reshape employee benefits in profound ways.

Independent Third Party Administrators usually provide a broad range of à la carte services to self-funded employers: plan design, claims processing, placement of stop loss coverage, case management, access to networks and disease management, wellness, and utilization review vendors, eligibility management and enrollment, subrogation, coordination of benefits, plan document and summary plan description preparation, billing, customer service, compliance assistance, ancillary benefits and add-ons such as Section 125 plans, consulting, and COBRA and HIPPA administration. Independent Third Party Administrators are best at customizing their services and plans to suit a client’s specific needs including benefit philosophies, demographics, risk tolerance, and compliance requirements.

A fully insured arrangement cannot compete with a thoughtfully designed, Third Party Administrator-administered self-funded program. Employers that self-fund enjoy increased financial control, lower operating costs, flexibility with plan design, a choice of networks, detailed reporting of plan usage and claims data, and effective cost management.

The Challenges Of The Affordable Care Act
When small employers (those with fewer than 50 full-time equivalent employees) offer health benefits, the coverage is usually fully insured. However, self-funding has gained momentum among small employers.

In 2014, large employers (those with 50 or more full-time equivalent employees) will be subject to the Affordable Care Act’s “pay or play” requirements. A large employer must offer its full-time employees (working at least 30 hours per week or 130 hours total in any given month) and their children minimum essential coverage that is affordable and provides minimum value. Otherwise, the employer will be subject to a penalty if any of its full-time employees obtains health coverage through a Health Insurance Exchange (now called a Health Insurance Marketplace) and is certified as eligible for a premium tax credit.

The premiums for fully insured coverage are expected to rise significantly due to the Affordable Care Act imposing an annual fee on most insurers, modified community rating in the individual and small group markets, and expensive mandates for essential health benefits. Self-funded plans are exempt from these requirements. In addition, while Affordable Care Act requirements will likely inflate insured premiums, stop loss premiums remain competitive (even for small employers).

Self-Funding As A Strategy For Overcoming The Affordable Care Act’s Challenges
Depending on size, employers must make important decisions about managing the costs associated with health care reform. They can provide coverage or not provide coverage (and possibly pay a penalty), reduce hours, eliminate jobs, or find a way to offer a cost-effective and compliant plan.

Independent Third Party Administrators are the experts at self-funding. A Third Party Administrator can custom design a high quality, Affordable Care Act-compliant, self-funded program that a small or large employer can offer at a controlled cost. For employers looking for flexible solutions to manage costs while continuing to recruit and retain talented employees, a Third Party Administrator-administered self-funded program with medical stop loss coverage is a viable solution.