Tag Archives: search engine

Demystifying “The Dark Web”

We often hear reference to the “deep” or “dark” web. What exactly is the deep or dark web? Is it as illicit and scary as it is portrayed in the media?

This article will provide a brief overview and explanation of different parts of the web and will discuss why you just might want to go there.

THE SURFACE WEB

The surface web or “Clearnet” is the part of the web that you are most familiar with. Information that passes through the surface web is not encrypted, and users’ movements can be tracked. The surface web is accessed by search engines like Google, Bing or Yahoo. These search engines rely on pages that contain links to find and identify content. Search engine companies were developed so that they can quickly index millions of web pages in a short time and to provide an easy way to find content on the web. However, because these search engines only search links, tons of content is being missed. For example, when a local newspaper publishes an article on its homepage, that article can likely be reached via a surface web search engine like Yahoo. However, days later when the article is no longer featured on the homepage, the article might be moved into the site’s archive format and, therefore, would not be reachable via the Yahoo search engine. The only way to reach the article would be through the search box on the local paper’s web page. At that time, the article has left the surface web and has entered the deep web. Let’s go there now…

THE DEEP WEB

The deep web is a subset of the Internet and is not indexed by the major search engines. Because the information is not indexed, you have to visit those web addresses directly and then search through their content. Deep web content can be found almost anytime you do a search directly in a website — for example, government databases and libraries contain huge amounts of deep web data. Why does the deep web exist? Simply because the Internet is too large for search engines to cover completely. Experts estimate that the deep web is 400 to 500 times the size of the surface web, accounting for more than 90% of the internet. Now let’s go deeper…

THE DARK WEB

The dark web or “darknet” is a subset of the deep web. The dark web refers to any web page that has been concealed because it has no inbound links, and it cannot be found by users or search engines unless you know the exact address. The dark web is used when you want to control access to a site or need privacy, or often because you are doing something illegal. Virtual private networks (VPNs) are examples of dark web sites that are hidden from public access unless you know the web address and have the correct log-in credentials.

One of the most common ways to access the dark web is through the Tor network. The Tor network can only be accessed with a special web browser, called the Tor browser. Tor stands for “ The onion router” and is referred to as “Onionland.” This “onion routing” was developed in the mid-1990s by a mathematician and computer scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory with the purpose of protecting U.S. intelligence communications online. This routing encrypts web traffic in layers and bounces it through random computers around the world. Each “bounce” encrypts the data before passing the data on to its next hop in the network. This prevents even those who control one of those computers in the chain from matching the traffic’s origin with its destination. Each server only moves that data to another server, preserving the anonymity of the sender.

Because of the anonymity associated with the Tor network and dark web, this portion of the Internet is most widely known for its illicit activities, and that is why the dark web has such a bad reputation (you might recall the infamous dark web site, Silk Road, an online marketplace and drug bazaar on the dark web). It is true that on the dark web you can buy things such as guns, drugs, pharmaceuticals, child porn, credit cards, medical identities and copyrighted materials. You can hire hackers to steal competitors’ secrets, launch a DDOS (distributed denial of service) attack on a rival, or hack your ex-girlfriend’s Facebook account. However, the dark web accounts for only about .01% of the web.

Some would say that the dark web has a bad rap, as not everything on the dark web is quite so “dark,” nefarious or illegal. Some communities that reside on the dark web are simply pro-privacy or anti-establishment. They want to function anonymously, without oversight, judgment or censorship. There are many legitimate uses for the dark web. People operating within closed, totalitarian societies can use the dark web to communicate with the outside world. Individuals can use the dark web news sites to obtain uncensored new stories from around the world or to connect to sites blocked by their local Internet providers or surface search engines. Sites are used by human rights groups and journalists to share information that could otherwise be tracked. The dark net allows users to publish web sites without the fear that the location of the site will be revealed (think political dissidents). Individuals also use the dark web for socially sensitive communications, such as chat rooms and web forums for sensitive political or personal topics.

Takeaway

Don’t be afraid – dive deeper!

Download the Tor browser at www.torproject.org and access the deep/dark web information you have been missing. Everything you do in the browser goes through the Tor network and doesn’t need any setup or configuration from you. That said, because your data goes through several relays, it can be slow, so you might experience a more sluggish Internet than usual. However, preserving your privacy might be worth the wait. If you are sick of mobile apps that are tracking you and sharing your information with advertisers, storing your search history, or figuring out your interests to serve you targeted ads, give the Tor browser a try.

Striking a Nerve: Google and Insurance

To say we struck a nerve in the industry with the Google and Insurance: Far Reaching Implications research is an understatement! It was picked up by all the major industry media – in some cases multiple times. It has set a record for downloaded and purchased SMA research, generating a torrent of follow-up calls and discussions. It has been shared and used by executive teams for discussion and strategic planning. The companion blog for the research had nearly 10,000 views – and continues to be posted, tweeted and retweeted a month and half after it was published! 

So why has there been such a strong interest and reaction in the industry?

Well, one reason might be that there is a fascination and admiration for the competitive drive in Google’s transformation from a search engine to an innovator of technologies and solutions like Android, Google cars, Google glasses, wearable devices and others. And then there is the fact that Google is securing a strong, growing (and enviable) customer loyalty. Don’t overlook the challenge to other innovators like Apple, Amazon and Microsoft – it’s impossible to ignore, just like Google's impressive growth and financial results! But the appeal that underpins all of this is Google’s unwavering vision of making information universally accessible and useful. Having a huge imagination that is spearheading innovation in multidimensional ways doesn’t hurt either! 

As Google drives innovation, offering an integrated and seamless customer experience and making available the use of its ground-breaking technologies to people in their everyday lives, the levels of customer intimacy and loyalty continue to increase. In the opposite direction, the vast amount of data becoming available via some of these technologies concerning individuals and their cars, homes and bodies is breath-taking. The change will be transformative! 

This is why the implications for insurance are so great. Google is bringing an outside-in, customer-driven approach to innovation that is causing insurers to rethink, reimagine and reinvent their visions of a technology-enabled future. Google is organizing data, technology and location around people, creating a level of customer empowerment and -centricity unheralded in any industry, let alone insurance. Not only is this powerful, it is fundamentally changing the business of insurance!   

Innovation is no longer just a nice-to-have initiative. It has become a must-have, strategic, core mandate that will define a new era of winners (and losers). Why? Because the increasingly rapid pace of change is challenging decades of business traditions and assumptions and demanding a response. This is unprecedented in the history of the insurance industry. All the while, the changes just keep coming: new technologies, the mash-up of technologies and new uses for these technologies.

These changes are highly disruptive, but they are also transformational. One industry innovation leader whom we recently spoke to about innovation noted that: “There is an outrageous level of individualism – from devices, data and components that will break the traditional infrastructure, culture and systems of traditional insurers.” Companies like Google, Apple, Uber, Zipcar and others, as well as next-gen and emerging technologies, are intensifying this level of individualism. 

Many insurers, large and small, are struggling to get their heads around a comprehensive view or a full understanding of the impact that these influencers will have on the disruption and transformation of the insurance industry. That is why the Google and Insurance research report has provoked such a response in the industry – because it provides insights and a glimpse of the challenges and opportunities for the industry. It also points to why, as an industry, we need to rethink how we respond to and embrace innovation as the core of a new culture and keystone of a new future. 

Other industries, from retail to books, music and movies, have experienced the same thing the insurance industry is now encountering: the very foundations of their businesses are being challenged, requiring novel thinking, experimentation, innovation and adoption of the new and emerging technologies. As one industry leader and CIO recently commented, “Insurers must build knowledge, a network and an ecosystem of outside-in relationships to reimagine and contribute to their company’s future.”

This persistent and continual disruption will necessitate a new way of embracing change and innovation. It will require a culture and model built around continuing collaboration and ideation that extends outside the traditional insurance organization. This is why an innovation mandate is critical.  

The innovation mandate must track and assess trends and influencers both inside and outside the industry, prepare plans and scenarios, experiment and collaborate to gain competitive advantage. Unfortunately, the day-to-day operational demands, time constraints and shortage of expertise or resources for evaluating the many implications for insurance will find most insurers unprepared or unequipped to respond to this level of disruption. More troubling is the way that many insurers are continuing to operate with the long-standing approach of wait-and-see or being a fast follower. With the accelerating release of next-gen technologies, eager competitors, new influencers and increasing customer demands, failing to adopt a culture of innovation and collaboration could create a potentially unsurmountable risk to survival of the business.

For insurers, the coming years promise unparalleled opportunity to increase their value to their customers. Those that are best able to capitalize on the key technology influencers will reap the most in rewards. In contrast, those that do not prepare for the future will find themselves falling behind, losing both competitive position and financial stability. To capture the full potential, insurers must determine to create and participate in an ecosystem of outside experts and resources; inspire their leadership; and enable their journey of change, transformation and innovation. Why will this be so important? Because the ecosystem will integrate new ideas and thinking from outside the organization, and provide that outside-in perspective needed to break legacy assumptions.  

The innovation journey toward rethinking, reimagining and reinventing the business of insurance has started. Strategy Meets Action has joined the journey. Have you?

Care Transparency – What Employers Are Missing!

Employers are trying hard to reduce health care costs and create a healthier, more-productive workforce. They have tried to optimize employee usage of services offered by their health plans and invested in wellness programs. They are now beginning to consider (or have implemented) cost transparency tools and second opinion and telemedicine services.

All these approaches are right!

What employers are missing is an understanding of how employees are making health care decisions and how that impacts their health care costs.

A large population of health care consumers are starting with a search engine to find health care information online. In the past year, 72% of U.S internet users have gone online specifically for health related information, and 77% of them begin their research at a search engine.1

And age has nothing to do with it!

Of those who seek health information online, 73% are 50 years of age or older.

At the same time, many doctors are urging patients to not rely so much on Google for health research. Doctors lament that they often have to correct misinformation or incorrect conclusions after patients do health research online.2

Even when employees go to a reputable site such as WebMD or a health plan’s member portal, they end up with a laundry list of treatment options. Try running a search for back pain — you will end up with more than two dozen treatment options. Health care consumers don’t know what is effective, appropriate or necessary, so most follow recommendations from friends or family or go through trial and error based on what they read online. Here are a few treatment decisions for back pain:

  • Buy a heating pad
  • Buy a muscle relaxant
  • Buy over-the-counter drugs
  • Go to the chiropractor (the one Uncle Bob recommended)
  • Go get massage therapy
  • Do yoga
  • Go to a doctor
  • Go to an orthopedic specialist (because your friend swears by it)

You get the point.

Each wrong treatment decision costs employers money — $235 per treatment decision, to be specific.3

Multiply that by the number of employees in your organization (and their dependents) and number of treatment decisions they make.

This is a huge avoidable cost.

Phone consultation services such as care/disease management or health advocacy are not going to stop employees from going online for help. It doesn’t make sense for employees to be calling someone every time they have a question regarding their health issues.

Employers also need to meet employees where they are — online. Employers need to provide them with tools that can help their research and decision making process with robust, accurate, unbiased and evidence-based information.

Employers can help create care transparency by offering Treatment Selection and Shared Decision Support tools. Employers can significantly improve the quality of care consumed by their employees and reduce health care costs by focusing on creating care transparency.

In my next article, I will write about the types of tools that will be effective in supporting employee decisions and the type of tools that employees will really use in making care/treatment decisions.

Sources:

1 77 Percent Of Online Health Seekers Start At Search Engines [Pew Study]

2 Doctors Warn Against Relying Too Much On Google

3 WiserTogether, Inc research