Tag Archives: RightIndem

10 Insurtech Trends at the Crossroads

The emergence of insurtech has reshaped the strategic insurance agenda. Here are the top 10 insurtech trends as we enter 2018.

Insurtech Trend #1 – Automation will replace human effort across the entire insurance value chain

This is a trend that is not unique to insurance. But it is a trend that will significantly affect the insurance sector. This is because much of the insurance industry still operates in pre-internet ways. It is also because many personal lines are being atomized. Small parcels of insurance protection cannot be packaged and sold with human input and remain cost-effective. It is also because customers demand it. They want a purely digital experience that does not require human contact when a machine will do nicely, thank you.

One to watch: ZhongAn

Insurtech trends article: Is the Rise of the Digital Advisor the new InsurTech Game Changer?

Insurtech Trend #2 – Insurance premiums will become highly personalized based on greater tech-enabled insight on customers and their individual risk

When you add together the massive growth in new sources of data together with tech-enabled data science, it is inevitable that premiums will become highly personalized. This will be enabled by tech such as wearables, telematics, IoT and smartphone apps. Not to mention the ability to build insights through relationships that exists across data sets. Gone will be the days when people of the same age and gender, with identical cars or homes living on the same street, will pay the same premium. In the future, other factors will apply to reflect greater granularity in their individual risk profiles. Data science will become a key set for underwriters and actuaries.

One to watch: Sherpa

Insurtech trends article: Insurance distribution is about to get personal

Insurtech Trend #3 – The blockchain era has begun, and there will be a rapid shift from pilot to production of distributed ledger technology

It is hard to find a major insurer that is not involved one way or another with a blockchain initiative. This will only continue as this disruptive tech continues to prove its ability to provide a viable solution. Of course, there are still some big questions to answer in terms of scale, performance and security, but those answers will come. The big breakthrough in insurance for blockchain will be in the back office for the complex and global world of wholesale, commercial and reinsurance (which is desperately in need of moving into the internet age).

One to watch: ChainThat

Insurtech trends article: R3’s partnership with ChainThat is one giant leap for insurance

See also: Insurtech: The Year in Review  

Insurtech Trend #4 – The lines between the old and new will blur as insurtech becomes mainstream by 2020

The defining characteristic of the Fourth Industrial Revolution is speed of change. This certainly applies to insurtech and its impact on the world of insurance. The rate at which insurtech startups are popping up all over the world is not surprising. Everyone wants a piece of this $7 trillion cake. The incumbents have responded, too. By investing in, partnering with and acquiring insurtechs, the incumbent insurers have wholly embraced the movement. This will lead to the creation of whole new digital brands, designed to cannibalize traditional business. And because it is simply too expensive and takes too long to transform legacy operations, the incumbents will ring fence and run them down.

One to watch: Munich Re

Insurtech trends article: Digital transformation is the strategic imperative no insurer can ignore

Insurtech Trend #5 – Digital engagement through lifestyle apps will change the relationship dynamic between insurer and insured

Lifestyle apps are the norm. It is hard to find anywhere in the world where this is not the case, so lifestyle apps are the perfect vehicle to provide the peace of mind that customers want when they buy insurance. Instead of the annual chore of hunting for the lowest-priced insurance then having nothing more to do with it unless you suffer a loss, lifestyle apps offer value on a daily basis. This makes them sticky, which, for insurers, means less churn. They also give insurers greater insight into their customers’ behavior, which means better-informed risk assessments and personalized premiums. And they build brand loyalty, which, if you believe in behavioral economics, will result in lower levels of claim embellishment and fraud.

One to watch: Metromile

Insurtech trends article: Metromile, the pioneers of digital engagement

Insurtech Trend #6 – The all-in-one insurance policy is here to stay

It has taken longer than I predicted back in 2015, but the all-in-one insurance policy is here. From a customer’s perspective, the all-in-one policy makes perfect sense. Especially for the millennials and Gen Y’s. Why can’t they simply have one relationship with one insurer and have everything covered in one go? And it’s not just for younger generations. Imagine giving the insurer the details about your car, home, health, travel, pets and possessions. The insurer gives you one overarching policy, a fair price and the ability to flexibly adjust the cover as needed. Operating on a membership model, the platform can provide safeguards and advise the customer on good and bad decisions. This is AI territory and relatively straightforward to automate. IMHO, this is a winner; watch this space!

One to watch: Getsafe

Insurtech trends article: Getsafe take the Lemonade model one step further

Insurtech Trend #7 – New models will challenge the traditional insurance value chain 

In the digital economy, where insurance is embedded into lifestyle products or distributed through ecosystems, the traditional insurance model doesn’t work. The inherent inefficiency in a highly intermediated value chain, too dependent on human effort, makes insurance products expensive. When as much as 80% of premium is lost on distribution, leaving barely a fifth for the risk pool, you know something has to change. In the words of Jeff Bezos, “your fat margin is my opportunity.” These new models will see the carriers squeezed as the reinsurers provide risk capital directly to digital brands. Regulatory frameworks will be reworked to reflect these shorter value chains that don’t require the many layers they have today.

One to watch: Amazon

Insurtech trends article: Redefining the insurance value chain

Insurtech Trend #8 – Lemonade has set the pace in Insurtech 2.0; copycats will follow

The first phase of insurtech was all about distribution and data. Then came Lemonade. In September 2016, they launched in New York, and a year later they cover around 50% of the U.S. population with their renters and home insurance products. For me, Lemonade have defined Insurtech 2.0. Many insurtech startups claim to redefine or reinvent insurance, but they simply don’t, whereas Lemonade has. It is inevitable that the copycats will appear. Some will be insurtech startups, although they will need to be as well-marshaled, experienced and funded as the Lemonade team to have any chance of success. And some will be the incumbents, which will have a go at creating a Lemonade model from within. These will almost certainly fail!

One to watch: Lemonade

Insurtech trends article: Lemonade really do have a big heart, killer prices and instant everything

See also: Top 10 Insurtech Trends for 2018  

Insurtech Trend #9 – Claims settlement will become an automated, self-service and quick-to-pay experience for customers

Insurers spend too much of a customer’s premium on handling the claims process. This is because the process is manual. And because the carrier wants to double-check the claim. And because customers don’t always tell the truth. And because there is too much time in the whole process. And and and and and. The insurtech solution is to put the claims process in the hands of the customer. This sounds counter-intuitive, but it isn’t. Taking a self-service approach, the customer provides video and images at FNOL and is in control of the claims process. Automated reviews of claims handle the vast majority of cases and award instant payouts. The money can be with the customer in a matter of hours. No long processing cycles, no time to embellish the claim and high levels of customer satisfaction. Those that fail the automated review are the exceptions handled by the carrier, which is what they’re looking for anyway! This will become the norm for claims management, once the fears and resistance of the lifelong claims directors can be overcome.

One to watch: Rightindem

Insurtech trends article: Democratizing insurance claims restores trust for customers

Insurtech Trend #10 – Tech-enabled loss prevention will become a key feature in the insurance product

Advances in everyday technology are increasing the ability to predict the likelihood of an event or outcome occurring. In home and motor, tech is being used to model behavior and identify exceptions. Sensors and phones and devices are all collecting data that define our individual norm (as opposed to a collective norm). As a result, any deviation can be instantly assessed, and action can be taken. To handle scale, this is 100%-automated, driven by AI and machine learning. Which means the opportunity for insurance is immense, because, instead of being a passive risk taker (which carriers are today), insurers will become active risk managers.

One to watch: Surely

Insurtech trends article: Digital implementation is the strategy insurers have been looking for

Insurtech prediction lists from previous years 

Looking forward with insurtech Insights – 10 predictions for 2017

Daily Fintech’s 2016 predictions for InsurTech

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Key Trends in Innovation (Part 6)

This article is the fifth in a series on key forces shaping the insurance industry. Parts One, Two, Three and Four/Five can be found here, here, here and here.

Trend #6: Delivering on the customer promise is the key

The ability to dynamically innovate (new risk pools, new segments, new channels) and deliver on the customer promise will become the most important competitive advantage as known risks continue to get commoditized and move to the direct channels.

One of the key forces driving the growth of insurtech is the current lack of engagement and, in some instances, the lack of trust between consumers and the industry. In our view, the ability to combine innovation with a model that improves the way individuals perceive and interact with insurance is critical in driving value creation.

Claims is at the heart of the customer promise

At the heart of the customer promise is the claims process. In many ways, it’s surprising that innovation in this area has been relatively modest given its economic importance (representing 60% to 70% of the overall cost base) and its importance in driving customer satisfaction. Our analysis has shown that the impact on renewals rates between a poor or positive claims experience is as high as 50%.

See also: Can Insurance Innovate?  

In most cases, claims acceptance rates are very high (often more than 90%). Despite this, individuals are skeptical. This is driven, in part, by the approach taken by the industry. As a minor example, often while you wait for your call to a claims center to be answered, you are reminded of the consequences of making a fraudulent claim. The insurance company seems to imply the most likely scenario is a fraudulent one. The interaction is off to a bad start before it’s even properly begun.

We have positioned claims innovation as one of our four key pillars with a solution built around a customer-managed claims platform called RightIndem. RightIndem allows an inefficient analog process to be converted into a digital one, resulting in significant cost savings for the insurer — both in claims handling costs and cost of claim. More importantly, though, the platform significantly enhances customer satisfaction by placing him or her at the heart of the process and by being easy, mobile-enabled, transparent and quick. (As an example, total loss motor claims were settled in a matter of days rather than the 21-day average that exists in the U.K.).

New models, new channels, new risk pools

Customer engagement is another important area of innovation, with several new approaches being tested. It’s important that insurance becomes more relevant and tailored to individuals’ needs and circumstances. As this happens, insurance moves from being a “sell” decision to a “buy” decision. Our earlier article on just-in-time insurance explored some of these trends in more detail.

Innovation is also allowing new ways to interact with customers, and we see potential in solutions that enable insurance at point of sale or point of demand.

In addition, new risk pools that allow niche or tailored solutions make insurance more relevant to individuals.

Finally, there are a number of models that are looking to change the nature of the customer promise. Insure A Thing (IAT), for example, has turned the traditional insurance process on its head. Rather than pay an upfront premium, customers are placed in affinity groups where cost of claims is shared among members, with a safety net provided by an insurance carrier. All parts of the value chain are aligned; IAT only earns fees when it pays claims.

Innovation, if insurers embrace it, will allow them to fundamentally change the customer dynamic and to create a new value proposition that is truly appreciated and valued by the customer.

See also: InsurTech: Golden Opportunity to Innovate  

We hope you enjoy these insights, and we look forward to collaborating with you as we create a new insurance future.

Next article in the series: Trend #7: Internal innovation, incubation and maturing of capabilities will no longer be the optimal option; dynamic innovation will require aggressive external partnerships and acquisitions.

Key Trends in Innovation (Part 1)

This article is the first in a series on key forces shaping the insurance industry.

Trend #1: In the future, insurance will be bought, sold, underwritten and serviced in a fundamentally different way, and that creates opportunities for industry leaders and problems for industry laggards.

We are still in the initial stages of what Gartner terms the Hype Cycle, with an ever-increasing amount of noise and expectation without clear impact and results.

Have we reached the peak of inflated expectations? We expect not. Certainly, valuations continue to rise with relatively new businesses still at the effectively pre-revenue stage commanding valuations in the tens of millions. Hard to justify on any fundamental level.

However, at the core of insurtech, we continue to see a huge opportunity to innovate in a sector that is ripe for change – lack of customer engagement, lack of customer trust, outdated and legacy infrastructure combined with traditional and unpopular products all highlight the need for change and the underlying potential.

Ignore Insurtech at Your Own Risk

Eos has talked with dozens of insurance companies, and there is a wide range of responses from the insurance community about when, where, if and how to engage with insurtech.

The top insurance companies have, for the most part, followed a two-phased approach combining an innovation team with a corporate venture initiative. These carriers see the impending disruption clearly and want to be able to shape and influence the impact. The results so far have been mixed, as some large incumbents have found it difficult to circumvent legacy mindsets, governance, organizational structures and technology.

See also: 10 Trends at Heart of Insurtech Revolution  

Other carriers have yet to agree/settle on an approach to deal with these disruptive forces.

Eos calculates that the impact of insurtech is at least 40% to the average carrier. We calculate that by looking at a 20% upside, and a 20% downside scenario:

On a conservative basis, insurers may risk losing at least 20% of their business to disruption. On the flip side, for those that embrace innovation there is an opportunity to grow their business by 20%.

Stated another way, the net present value (NPV) of insurtech is $100 million for every $1 billion of premium on the downside and $285 million on the upside, assuming a top-line and profitability improvement.

Timing is also key, as the scale of adoption and impact is not linear. The upside opportunity by investing now in the right opportunities is likely to give an insurer a lead that others can’t catch — essentially a “first-mover” advantage. At the same time, the lost opportunity by delaying is exponential, not linear.

There are many ways to create and capture value

The positive momentum is further driven by the growth of insurtech into all areas of the value chain and across multiple product lines. We see two broad types of innovator: the “enabler” and the “disruptor.”

The enabler is a business that significantly improves an existing part of the value chain driving efficiency, improved customer satisfaction or better customer outcomes. A great example is RightIndem, which is transforming the claims process by creating an end-to-end, customer-managed claims process.

The disruptor is a business that has developed a new approach to fulfilling part, or all, of the value chain. This is illustrated by Insure A Thing, an insurtech startup that has created a way of providing insurance without the need for an upfront premium.

On face value, the disruptors may appear more exciting, but the enablers perhaps better illustrate the underlying potential of insurtech, as there are an abundance of opportunities for most insurance companies to hit “the low-hanging fruit” and do things better, more cheaply and more aligned with the customer.

Insurtech is not an overnight revolution, and there are many ways to create and capture value that combine different elements of the above, for example:

  • Low-hanging fruit — these are mostly your enablers,
  • True differentiators — a combination of enablers and disruptors
  • Measured bets for the future — all pure disruptors

At Eos, we continue to adapt and evolve our investment strategy to take advantage of these opportunities, with an initial focus on our three core platforms:

  • Digital distribution
  • Frictionless claims
  • Artificial intelligence for risk selection, underwriting, pricing and capital optimization

All of the above underpin our first trend and belief that the future of insurance will look very different than today, with all areas of the value chain from distribution, underwriting, products, claims and customer engagement changing fundamentally:

  • Bought differently: As asset ownership (cars, homes, etc.) mobility and crossborder employment evolve with the shared economy, insurance covers (at least personal lines initially) will be bought on a just-in-time, on-demand, needs basis. Greater information transparency on the buyer and seller side will enable direct interaction with lower cost of intermediation/brokerage. We see this starting with simpler personal line covers and gradually evolving to more complex risks.
  • Sold differently: Insurance will be quoted, bound and issued at points of transaction/sales/service enabled by ubiquitous IoT, telematics and external data availability. Selling will become increasingly distributed and linked to companies with strong customer engagement across both B2C and B2B sectors.
  • Serviced differently: End consumers will choose how to be serviced and made whole via a channel, time and a manner of their choice. Servicing, especially claims, will focus on “delivering on the customer promise” as an integral part of the policy.

See also: Industry Trends for 2017  

We hope you enjoy these insights, and look forward to collaborating with you as we create a new insurance future.

Next article in the series: Trend #2: “External data and contextual information will become increasingly more important than historical internal data for predicting risk and pricing.”

This article was written by Sam Evans, Carl Bauer-Schlichtegroll and Jonathan Kalman.

10 Trends at Heart of Insurtech Revolution

As the insurance industry enters a period of profound change, we at Eos use a concept called the 20/20 dynamic to illustrate the point:

On a conservative basis, we believe most insurers risk losing at least 20% of their business to disruption. On the flip side, for those that embrace innovation there is an opportunity to grow their business by 20%.

Our goal is to ensure our strategic investors are on the right side of this equation.

Insurtech represents a unique opportunity for insurers to evolve their business model. Insurtech is not necessarily about disruption, but more an opportunity to take advantage of technology and data to create innovative solutions, reduce costs and capture greater value for customers, brokers and intermediaries, underwriters and service providers.

At one level, active participation is required just to meet the basic requirements of playing in the new market. For those committed to a strategic approach, insurtech can help drive true competitive differentiation, while enabling measured bets for the future.

See also: Insurtech: Unstoppable Momentum  

Underpinning this transformation are 10 key trends that we have identified and believe will be at the heart of the insurtech evolution:

  1. Insurance, as we have it known it historically, will be bought, sold, underwritten and serviced in a fundamentally different way within the next three years
  2. External data and contextual information will become increasingly more important than historical internal data for predicting risk and pricing
  3. A majority of the simple covers will be bought in standard units through a marketplace/ exchange, permitting just-in-time, need and exposure based protection through mobile access
  4. Solutions will continue to evolve from protection to behavioral change then to prevention — even across complex commercial insurance
  5. Although proliferation of data and increasing transparency on the buyer and seller will cause disintermediation for simple covers, it will also create opportunities for brokers and intermediaries to innovate solutions and channels for their B2C (non-standard risk pools, retirees/older generation, healthcare gaps) and B2B (emerging and unknown risks, cyber, global supply chains, cross-border liability, terrorism) customers
  6. The ability to dynamically innovate (new risk pools, new segments, new channels) and deliver on the customer promise will become the most important competitive advantage (as known risks continue to get commoditized and move to the direct channels)
  7. Internal innovation, incubation and maturing of capabilities will no longer be the optimal option; dynamic innovation will require aggressive external partnerships and acquisitions
  8. Simple “Grow or Go” decisions of the last decade will be sub-optimal, as the dust settles in insurtech; building in future optionality and degrees of freedom will be the key
  9. Consolidation just for economies of scale will provide increasingly less marginal value in non-life as well as life insurance; real value creation will come from “economies of skill” and digital capabilities
  10. Deep learning (next generation of AI), blockchain and genomics technologies will improve financial inclusion and better meet the needs of the under-insured and uninsured

We have linked the above trends to analysis of how profit pools will change over time to build an investment strategy that also focuses on platforms or clusters that allow us to build more compelling propositions by connecting related players in adjacent parts of the value chain.

Three areas of initial focus are:

1. A digital front office solution that leverages an open architecture platform developed by Convista (OneDigitalOffice), augmented by relevant startups including, for example, on-demand insurance by Oula.la and social media adoption by Digital Fineprint.

The ability to drive dynamic innovation is driven by technology stack/system flexibility to respond quickly to customer needs. New risk pools, new products and new ways to reach customers will place massive pressure on traditional systems, making a dynamic digital front office key to execution.

  • 360-degree multi-channel (direct, field sales force, internal sales force, independent agents/brokers) connectivity
  • Augmented functionality across the value chain from sales/distribution through underwriting, binding and servicing
  • Sales funnel optimizer (sales force effectiveness) — inquiry/quote, quote-to-submission, submission-to-bind ratio
  • Sales force/intermediary (broker/agent) segmentation and performance management

As an example, the impact of the sharing economy and need for on-demand insurance will require instant pricing and cover that switches on and off at point of sale to meet the needs of the customer.

2. An end-to-end claims solution developed by RightIndem and supported by additional capability from other technology providers

The claims space is an interesting one; it represents the largest individual expense on any P&C insurer’s P&L but conversely has seen very little innovation. This is now starting to change. RightIndem has developed a platform that achieves significant improvements in customer satisfaction while significantly reducing the cost of managing the claim. This is a win/win for the customer and the insurer and in our view a classic enabler technology that takes an existing function within the insurance value chain but does it much more effectively and with the interests of the customer at its core.

See also: Insurtech Checklist: 10 Differentiators  

3. Artificial intelligence (AI) with an initial focus on life and health insurance developed by Gen.Life

We are particularly excited about the combination of AI and the latest health technology to transform insurance. Examples include Livingo Health, which combines a blood glucose monitor support and intervention to help coach people through diabetes, and Cycardia Health, which employs machine learning predictive analytics software to categorize abnormal circadian patterns in otherwise healthy breast tissue to provide early detection of breast cancer. These types of technology will allow the early detection of potential diseases so that preventative treatment can be started much earlier, dramatically improving chances of success. Rather than life and health insurance being about prospective payments after an event, they can become the key mechanism for deploying technology to allow people to enjoy healthy lives.

The insurance industry will look very different in five years, but more importantly there is an opportunity to drive huge benefits to society through reducing under-insurance and supporting the transition from protection to prevention.

In Search of a New ‘Dominant Design’

There is little in the world of insurtech happening today that insurers couldn’t arguably choose to do for themselves if they were motivated to do it. They have the capital to invest. They have resources and could hire to fill gaps in any new capabilities required. They understand the market and know how to move with the trends. And yet insurers readily engage with the startup community to do the things that arguably they could do for themselves.  Why is that?

In Making the Most of the Innovation Ecosystem, Mike Fitzgerald observes the main cultural differences between insurers and the startups they court. These differences give us a strong clue as to why insurers engage with startups, even though on paper they do not and should not need them.

Alongside these deep cultural differences, I believe that there is another angle worth exploring to help answer the question. That’s the market’s maturity stage and, with it, the strategies required to succeed.

One model that helps explain this relates to the work of Abernathy and Utterback on dynamic innovation and the concept of the “dominant design.” To accept the argument, you first need to believe that we’re on the cusp of a shift from an old world view of the industry based on a well-understood and stable design toward one where substantial parts of the insurance proposition and value network are up for grabs. You also need to believe that, for a period at least, these two (or more) worlds will co-exist.

See also: Insurtech Has Found Right Question to Ask  

So, here’s a quick overview of the model (in case you’re not familiar with it)…

Settling on a ‘dominant design’

First introduced way back in the mid-1970s and based on empirical research (famously using conformance toward the QWERTY keyboard as an example), Abernathy and Utterback observed that when a market (or specifically a technology within a market) is new, there first exists a period of fluidity where creativity and product innovation flourishes. During this period, huge variation in approaches and product designs can co-exist as different players in the market experiment with what works and what does not.

In this early, “fluid” stage, a market is typically small, and dominated by enthusiasts and early adopters. Over time, a dominant design begins to emerge as concepts become better understood and demand for a certain style of product proves to be more successful than others. Here, within an insurance context, you’d expect to see high levels of change and a preference for self-built IT systems to control and lower the cost of experimentation.

Once the dominant design has been established, competition increases and market activity switches from product innovation to process innovation – as each firm scrambles to find higher-quality and more efficient ways to scale to capture a greater market share. This is the “transitionary” stage.

Finally, in the “specific” stage, competitive rivalry intensifies, spurred on by new entrants emulating the dominant design; incremental innovation takes hold; and a successful growth (or survival) strategy switches to one that either follows a niche or low-cost commodity path. Within an insurance context, outsourcing and standardization on enterprise systems are likely to dominate discussions.

Applying the ‘dominant design’ concept to the world of insurance and insurtech

Building on the co-existence assumption made earlier, within the world of insurtech today there are broadly (and crudely) two types of firms: (1) those focused on a complete proposition rethink (such as TrovSlice and Lemonade); and (2) those focused on B2B enablement (such as Everledger, Quantemplate and RightIndem). The former reside in the “fluid” stage (where the new dominant design for the industry has not yet been set and still may fail) and the latter in the “transitionary” stage (where the dominant design is known, but there are just better ways to do it).

Figure: Innovation, Insurance and the ‘Dominant Design’

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(Source: Celent – Adapted from Abernathy and Utterback (1975))

Outside of insurtech, within the “specific” stage, there is the traditional world of insurance (where nearly all of the world’s insurance premiums still sit, by the way), which is dominated by incumbent insurers, incumbent distribution firms, incumbent technology vendors and incumbent service providers.

So what? 

What I like about this model is that it starts to make better sense of what I believe we’re seeing in the world around us. It also helps us to better classify different initiatives and partnership opportunities, and encourages us to identify specific tactics for each stage – the key lesson being “not to apply a ‘one size fits all’ strategy.”

See also: 8 Exemplars of Insurtech Innovation  

Finally, and more importantly, it moves the debate from being one about engaging insurtech startups purely to catalyze cultural change (i.e., to address the things that the incumbent firms cannot easily do for themselves) toward one begging for more strategic and structural questions to be asked, such as: Will a new dominant design for the industry really emerge? What will be its timeframe to scale? A what specific actions are required to respond (i.e. to lead or to observe and then fast-follow)?

Going back to my original question: What does insurtech have to offer? Insurers can do nearly all of what is taking place within insurtech as it exists today by themselves…but, as stated at the start of this article, if, and only if, they are motivated to do so.

And there’s the rub. Many incumbents have been operating very successfully for so long in the “specific” stage, optimizing their solutions, that making the shift required to emulate a “fluid” stage is a major undertaking – why take the risk?

This is not the only issue that is holding them back. For me, the bigger question remains one of whether there is enough evidence to show the existence of an emerging new dominant design for the industry in the “fluid” stage that will scale to a size that threatens the status quo. Consequently, in the meantime, partnering and placing strategic investments with insurtech firms capable of working in a more fluid way may offer a smarter, more efficient bet.

In a way, what we’re seeing today happening between insurers and insurtech firms  is the equivalent of checking out the race horses in the paddock prior to a race.  Let the race begin!