Tag Archives: private equity

6 Trends Signaling Major Opportunity

Last year, I decided to pursue a career transition as a full-time occupation. I’ve been out in the market for the past six months, assessing business opportunities as I network with executives in financial services, healthcare, media and retail, as well as with VCs, private equity investors and advisers.

What’s been great is that invariably any role in any organization, however broad, will be framed by the priorities that drive the business, which may be using a short-range lens defined by the annual plan, or one that doesn’t offer much of a peripheral view.  Transition-as-occupation offers full permission to set the aperture and depth of field for insight-gathering and exploration.

What has also been remarkable is not only the generosity of many people at the top of their respective fields to share perspectives, but also how I’ve been able to help others by playing the role of connector among people who may not normally meet up with each other, but who are excited to understand how others are addressing common questions in a complex and changing environment.

Here are six connected trends on the collective mind of the leaders with whom I’ve met. They represent a snapshot of what I am hearing. Within them are opportunities to be realized across this industry:

  • Customer-centricity – is it talk or walk? C-suiters certainly verbalize that “customer-centricity” matters, but few teams demonstrate that empathizing with the customer is bedrock for viable, win/win relationships, growth and profit improvement. The phrase has as many definitions as (or more than) the number of people defining it. Most significantly, the connection to concrete, quantifiable business priorities is generally missing. For those who get beyond the buzzwords, there is tremendous tangible value, even disruptive opportunity, in being a customer-focused player in this sector.
  • Old norms don’t work…digital and innovation are essential. Businesses are faced with redesigning processes, structures and metrics, recruiting more agile learners who are also able to deliver and overcoming legacy infrastructure to adopt new technologies. This level of change in the way businesses operate is not for the faint-hearted. The companies that take on these real implementation requirements will gain ground.
  • Yes, technology truly is changing everything. Even with greater efficiency, there is no growth without compelling offerings that meet big market needs. For companies engineered to serve baby boomers, serving the millennial generation requires profound change, not just a digital coat of paint. The implications go way beyond having a social media presence, cool apps and clever advertising. The millennial generation is inheriting a different world, re-shaped in good and bad ways by prior generations.  The starting point for progress is to be truly insight-led, and not presume you know what people want and need.
  • The marketing bar is being raised. This discipline has been disrupted, and more is being demanded. Traditionally viewed as “support” people, marketers are now being held to results that require a different seat at the table, a different talent profile, processes and resources and an entirely new set of connections with colleagues and external partners. Begin by redefining relationships, especially with product, IT and sales internally, and with the advertising and media agencies as key outside partners.
  • Two tales are playing out within financial services. Legacy institutions remain heavily focused on regulation, compliance, expense reduction and cyber security…while fin tech is hot, with capital flowing into payments, wealth management, consumer lending and related start-ups pursuing market disruption and reshaping the industry. Start-ups are doing great things in this sector and will keep incumbents on their toes, as well as representing potential acquisition opportunities as a strategy to modernize. Alignment around a clear strategy and a collaborative culture are at the foundation of leading change vs. playing defense.
  • Healthcare disruption is creating opportunities, but the pace is slow. Payers and providers are aiming to address Affordable Care Act and other government, employer and consumer-driven impacts.  Using electronic medical records, controlling employer healthcare expenses and enabling patient accountability for medical care decisions are just three of many big and complex challenges. The road to change will be long and slow given the sheer complexity and fragmentation of healthcare delivery. As in financial services, new entrants are leading innovation with solutions that address elements of the ecosystem. As in financial services, there is room for incumbents to realize opportunity with the right strategic and cultural conditions.
workers' comp

Workers’ Comp: Where the Smart Money Is…

What’s with all the investor interest in workers’ comp services? There are several dozen private equity (PE) firms looking hard at the workers’ comp services business today, with many pursuing acquisitions of companies large and small. While their approaches, priorities and goals may differ slightly, there are several reasons why their attention will likely persist for some time.

First, there are a lot more investment firms out there these days than five or 10 years ago, with a lot more capital to invest. That means lots of smart people with big bank accounts are looking to park millions of dollars, which means there’s a lot of competition for attractive companies.

Second, some comp services companies have gotten pretty big, with earnings in the tens of millions of dollars and revenues north of $200 million. Finding potential targets, conducting due diligence and going through the deal process takes about the same amount of time and staff if it is a $50 million or $350 million deal. Obviously, PE firms would rather do a couple or three large deals than a bunch of smaller ones as it’s a lot less work on the front end, and a lot less to manage and oversee after the deal is done. And PE firms just seem to like companies with more revenue.

Third, what used to be considered a problem — the regulatory risk associated with a workers’ comp company — is now seen as a strength when compared to a non-work comp healthcare firm. Investors see the 51 regulatory bodies affecting workers’ comp as creating far less risk than the single regulator driving Medicare, Medicaid and most health insurance programs. Investors don’t know what’s going to come out of CMS as reform is implemented, so PE firms are hedging their bets by going where, in a worst-case scenario, they’re going to get hurt in one or two big states.

Fourth, there are a lot of inefficiencies, stodgy business practices and just plain poorly run sectors of the workers’ comp business. PE firms make a lot of money by stripping out inefficiencies, delivering better performance, streamlining workflows and processes, removing cost and delivering more value. Anyone who’s spent any time at all in work comp knows that there are a plethora of opportunities out there to do all of these.

Bill processing, analytically driven medical management, intelligent utilization review, provider clinics, complex case services, IMEs/peer review and chronic pain management and addiction services are just a few sectors where there’s a ton of opportunity.

Interestingly, no PE firm has yet taken advantage of the biggest opportunity in workers’ comp. That opportunity is to buy a comp carrier/TPA, rationalize the claims and medical management process, write workers’ comp insurance and make huge profits by controlling medical costs and delivering much better outcomes. The investment executives I’ve spoken with about this seem to be afraid of the risk; what if they do it wrong, or get a bunch of bad claims, or whatever?

To which I respond: You can’t do it any worse than many of the current comp carriers, so what are you waiting for?