Tag Archives: Prilosec

There May Be a Cure for Wellness

During my tenure at both British Petroleum and Walmart, I tried various forms of wellness, but to no avail. There were never any savings, participation was low, employees didn’t like it, and administration was complex.

I’ve continued to follow the wellness industry but could never see any genuine success stories. The gratifying news is that I’m not the only one to notice any more. The Los Angeles Times called wellness a scam while Slate just recently called it a sham. And Al Lewis, my co-author on Cracking Health Costs, would say they’re being polite. Most recently, he has noted that the 2016 Koop Award is going to a vendor whose own data shows they made employees unhealthier.

See also: The Yuuuuge Hidden Costs of Wellness  

Speaking of Al Lewis, he has now entered the employee health field directly with Quizzify, which transforms the boring but long-overdue task of educating employees about health, healthcare and their health benefit into an entertaining trivia game. As a colleague and co-author, I have an obvious conflict of interest as I describe my impressions below, so don’t take my word for any of this. Just go play the sample short game right on the website, and ask yourself if you’re learning anything useful, right off the bat. Click here for a link to Quizzify.

Do you think your employees already know this stuff? It’s doubtful. Americans vastly over-consume healthcare; it’s almost free at the point of service once the deductible is satisfied, and they are being bombarded with ads and marketing, as are their doctors. Nothing can solve this massive problem, but Quizzify can help, and is about the only vendor even trying. Backed by doctors at Harvard Medical School and a 100% savings guarantee, Quizzify provides a plethora of shock-and-awe, “counter-detailing” questions-and-answers (with full links to sources) that will educate even the savviest consumers of healthcare and entertain even the dourest CFO. Nexium? Prilosec? Prevacid? You wouldn’t believe the hazards of long-term use. Then there is the sheer waste and possible harm of annual checkups, well-woman visits, PSA tests and so on.

Speaking of hazards, CT scans emit as much as 1,000 times the radiation of an X-ray. Uninformed people are going clinics that will give them a “preventive” CT scan. If a doctor suggested patients have a series of a thousand X-rays for “preventive” reasons, there would be a stampede out of the office.

On the other hand, there are instances where people should go to the doctor but don’t. Swollen ankles? Painless, perhaps, but you may have a circulation problem, possibly a serious one. Blood in your urine, but it goes away before you even make an appointment? That could be a bladder tumor tearing and then re-attaching itself, especially if you smoke. And show me one health risk assessment that correctly advises people over 55 or 60 to get a shingles vaccine if they had chicken pox as a kid.

Then there are the health hazards of everyday life. Those healthy-sounding granola bars are full of sugars cleverly hidden in the ingredients labels. And whoever says vaping is safer that smoking better not be pregnant, because for pregnant moms, incredibly, vaping could be worse for the unborn baby. Just as with the shingles vaccine, chances are your HRA is silent on the texting-while-driving (TWD) issue while obsessing about seat belts, but TWD is by far the more underappreciated hazard.

See also: Wellness Promoters Agree: It Doesn’t Work

Your HRA is probably also silent on the health risks of loneliness, poor spending habits, boredom and most of the other major health risks Robert Woods, PhD, and I describe in our book, An Illustrated Guide to Personal Health. Quizzify has many questions on spending habit, but, if I had one complaint, it would be that (at least in the questions I’ve seen) Quizzify doesn’t address these risks we’ve described in this book.

One of the largest health risks that workers have is being in a job you hate. You won’t see that question on anyone’s HRA either, or in Quizzify. That issue could lead to mass resignations in some pressure cooker companies.

Scores and scores of people have told me they fudge answers on HRAs, anyway. Interestingly, they feel they are on the ethical high ground to do that because of the goofy, nosy and intrusive questions they are asked to answer, e.g., asking about your pregnancy plans in the future. Quizzify, on the other hand, encourages people to cheat. Quizzify wants you to look up the answers because that’s how you learn. So instead of denying human nature, Quizzify channels it.

Conclusion: if you offer old-fashioned wellness, walk, don’t run, to the nearest exit. If you want to look at something that shows huge promise, check out Quizzify.

How End of Life Is the Real Healthcare Crisis

To contend with ever-escalating healthcare costs, Americans will need to come to grips with the cost of end-of-life care. Right now, it’s my reality. I am seeing, first hand, rampant and seemingly uncontrollable costs of sustaining life in a system that lacks any semblance of common sense.

My mother is 90 years old and, other than some spending on five healthy sons, has expended very limited healthcare dollars in her lifetime. That is, until now. Suffering mild dementia, she is a resident in a very pleasant assisted-living facility on Long Island. The facility takes good care of her creature comforts, but, medically, she appears to be a case study in why we are all facing a cost crisis. Two of my brothers are medical professionals, and we have a concerned, knowledgeable, family that oversees her care, but we are not with her all the time to manage treatment, and that’s where things break down.

At the first sign of an issue, the facility phones an ambulance and ships her off to the nearest emergency room — three times in the past few months. The first was because of the flu. She weathered the illness but, because of scarcity of resources, was bedridden for a week. As a result, she needed more than a month of inpatient rehabilitation to restore her ambulatory skills. I am guessing that this episode cost in excess of $50,000. The doctor believes that the next two episodes – which occurred in the past 10 days – relate to an allergic reaction, and he has been trying to rule out possible culprits. He took her off Prilosec, and soon thereafter she complained of chest pains, which turned out to be indigestion. So the hospital sent her home. She burned through about $3,000 in costs to figure that one out. Then, after some tinkering with her medication, her blood pressure spiked to 200/113. This has resulted in another in-patient stay. We are planning to keep her moving to avoid another costly rehabilitation; so, for this one, Medicare and her supplemental insurance will probably spend less than $20,000.

The medical expenses she has experienced could have easily been reduced. The problem is that our Medicare system pays for services rendered and not for care management. Care management would have resulted in a much better outcome for my mother, for our family and for U.S. taxpayers.

I am convinced that the Affordable Care Act is not the answer to solve the healthcare crisis, which can only be fixed if we change the way we deliver care at the end of life. And those who lobby for Medicare for all can consider my mother’s experiences. That’s certainly not the answer.