Tag Archives: philippines

Are Philippines Next for Disruption?

With a population of approximately 102 million, the Philippines was the fastest-growing economy in Asia in 2016 and is one of the fastest-growing in the world. With more than half of the population under the age of 25 and buoyed by $50 billion in remittances and outsourcing annually, the economy is expected to outperform its peers over the coming years. This, combined with a $160 billion infrastructure plan, will set the stage for a rapid increase in the size of the middle class.

See also: Insurtech Ecosystem Emerging in Asia

The Philippine insurance sector is one of the oldest in the region, with development dating back more than 200 years — and it is among the region’s most mature and competitive markets. There are now more than 32 million Filipinos covered by insurance, with 28 million of those covered by rapidly expanding micro insurance products. The ratio of coverage increased dramatically from 19% in 2010 to nearly 33% in 2016. There are currently 63 brokers, 31 life insurers, 71 non-life insurers and one reinsurance firm operating in the country. There is also a growing international presence, with global firms such as Axa and Mapfre investing heavily in the market. 

We believe that a country’s insurance market is ripe for disruption when it has:

1. A rapidly growing middle class;

2. Strong and sustained economic growth;

3. Increasing demand for insurance products;

4. Increasing levels of leisure and family-oriented activities; and

5. Growing levels of disposable income and, most importantly, society that is embracing digital technology and connections.

The Philippines clearly has the first four attributes, but what about the digital aspect? Consider the following: The Philippines is the third-largest and fastest-growing market in smartphones in SE Asia. Three in 10 Filipinos own a smartphone. The average smartphone user spends three hours and 14 minutes a day on the internet via smartphone. Of that time, 78 minutes a day is spent on entertainment and related content, 56 minutes a day on apps and 40 minutes a day on communications services. Within 15 minutes of waking up in the morning, 79% of Filipinos have already checked their smartphones, and 40 million Filipinos are active on social media. Of those, 81% use Androids, with the remaining 19% using IOS. As to demographics and usage, 88% of users are under the age of 34, with 53% under the age of 24.

The usage and social media aspects are even more telling, with 94% of all users on Facebook. And 32% of Filipino smartphone users download six or more apps per month, while 45% of those have paid for apps or made in-app purchases. Mobile banking is now used by 14% of smartphone owners, and this usage is increasing 25% per year.

See also: Why Southeast Asia Is Ready for Disruption

Is the Philippine insurance industry ripe for disruption? Is the Pope Catholic!

Insurtech Ecosystem Emerging in Asia

Building on T.J. Geelen’s blog post about the thriving fintech ecosystems in Asia, I’d like to share with you some insights relating to the emerging insurtech ecosystem in the region. Although insurtech in Asia is in its infancy, since 2015 we’ve seen a surge of interest. By the way, I’m a big believer that Asia has a real potential to power the next wave of global insurance innovation.

Four flavors of insurtech

First, let’s revisit the definition of insurtech to make sure we are all on the same page. Essentially, there will be three major camps of insurtech: one that enhances existing insurance structures, another one that aims to disrupt by providing alternative digital risk transfer mechanisms and the third type coming from existing insurance firms attempting to defend their existing market positions. The first and third types broadly can be broken into the following sub-types:

  • Product sales/distribution (aggregators, online portals, apps)
  • Risk management (IoT, healthtech, blockchain)
  • Fraud detection/prevention (big data, machine learning)
  • Claims management (big data, machine learning, vendor network management solutions)
  • Service management (chatbots)
  • Investment management (portfolio optimization, asset/liability matching)

The second type attempts to drive an end-to-end structural innovation, either removing part of the structure or fully digitizing it.

Why Asia for insurtech

Asia is attractive from both an insurer and an insurtech perspective due to the size of its significantly underinsured population. The region has traditionally seen a large part of the risks self-insured through family and community networks. As the region experiences rapid growth in the affluence of its population, together with an aging population, the risk exposure is becoming even more apparent, and the need for alternative risk transfer mechanisms, including insurance, increases. Insurtech, alongside traditional insurance, can help.

Further, there are near-perfect locations for the launch of a program. Singapore, for one, allows for sandboxed experimentation, regulatory support and advanced tech infrastructure. Limitations of traditional insurance distribution channels and the rapid increase of 4G mobile penetration mean that insurers are also highly interested in exploring innovative partnerships that help them connect with potential customers.

See also: Matching Game for InsurTech, Insurers

Insurtech in Asia

Asia is a very diverse region and has a mix of developed and emerging countries. So far, the major push for insurtech has come from China, India, and Singapore, while Japan, Korea and emerging Vietnam, Cambodia, Taiwan, Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and Burma have lagged. (While Australia and New Zealand are geographically close and are very well integrated in the Asian region, the markets are much more ”Westernized” and hence are less applicable to this blog post.)

There’s China, and then there’s everyone else when it comes to insurtech. The first full stack (end-to-end) innovator, Zhong An, is valued at a massive $8 billion and raised $931 million. It accounts for more than a third of the global insurtech funding in 2015. It is also worth mentioning TongJuBao (peer-to-peer) insurer and FWD (Asia’s second-richest family’s insurance venture, which is re-positioning itself from traditional insurer to an agile digital insurance competitor).

India, another vibrant insurance market, has seen its insurtech innovation focus mostly on distribution. Not surprisingly, two of the major aggregators come from India: Policy Bazaar and CoverFox have seen healthy level of customer take-up as well as sources of funding. CoverFox has recently expanded its service proposition, now assisting customers with their insurance claims.

Being based in Singapore, I have a particularly detailed view of the insurtech landscape in Southeast Asia. So far, I have gathered the following mapping of Asia insurtech startups as they fit within the insurance value stack. There’s a mix of very-early-stage as well as more mature Series A and listed ventures. The list keeps growing.

Please feel free to comment and reach out if you come across any additional startups that I’ve missed out in the list below, and I’ll update it.

Area:

Distribution

Actual Losses

Operating Insurance Co.

Value:

20%

55% Losses + 5% Fraud

20%

Role:

Aggregators

Leads Generation

Customer Transactions

Improving risks

Fraud detection

Rewarding healthy

Risk assessment

Loss adjustment

Operational/Service Efficiency

Start-ups: Policy Bazaar (Aggregator)

CoverFox (Aggregator)

Health/House-front

Latize (Fraud) JustMove (Health)

Uhoo (Health IoT)

Harti (Health)

WaveCell (Comms platform)

Fixir (Finding repair garage)

MyDoc (Health claims)

Stash.ph (Health claims)

GoBear.sg (Aggregator)

Cxa (Employee benefits)

PolicyPal (Policy mgm.)

UEX (Group policies)

Zhong An (General Insurance) CH

TongJuBao (Peer to Peer Insurance) CH

DirectAsia (Direct General Insurance) SG

FWD (General / Life Insurance) HK

Singapore Life (Upcoming Life Insurance Startup) SG

 

Corporate insurtech

Singapore, with its advanced infrastructure and innovation-supportive financial services regulator (MAS), has secured a leadership position for Asia’s corporate insurance innovation as reflected by the high concentration of insurance innovation centers. Eight of 10 Asian insurance innovation centers are based in Singapore. The innovation centers are powerful corporate change catalysts and typically include elements of awareness building and cultural transformation.

Firm Innovation Center Country Focus Status
Aviva Digital Garage Singapore Digital Transformation Active
Manulife Loft Singapore Digital Transformation Active
MetLife LumenLab Singapore New business models Active
Allianz Digital Labs Singapore Digital Transformation Active
AXA Data Innovation Lab Singapore Big data Active
AIA Edge Singapore HealthTech Active
Munich Re Innovation Lab China General Insurance Launched Q1 2016
Swiss Re

India IoT, AI, Big data Planned July 2016
IAG

Singapore

Rumored 2016
NTUC

Singapore

Rumored 2016

 

In summary, Asia is a region to watch when it comes to insurtech. Whether it be the home-grown insurance innovation from China and India, corporate innovation from Singapore or innovation concepts imported from elsewhere and deployed in Asia, the region is likely to deliver a vibrant insurtech ecosystem during the course of the next two to three years. And when the dust and excitement settles down five years down the road, we’ll have a fundamentally stronger set of competitors.

Wanting to accelerate insurance innovation, we’ve created InsurtechAsia, an action-oriented community of insurance practitioners, entrepreneurs and industry stakeholders across Asia. We are aiming to attract the best minds to tackle the challenges and opportunities in insurance, connect entrepreneurs with the best enablers, validate concepts and help business scale rapidly.

See also: New Insurance Models: The View From Asia  

A dedicated and company-agnostic insurtech accelerator, such as Startupbootcamp InsurTech, which was launched in London in late 2015, would go a long way to spur further insurance innovation here in Asia. We eagerly await the day when Startupbootcamp InsurTech will come to Singapore.

Are you passionate about making a change to the insurance industry? If so, join us at www.insurtechasia.com and follow this great team of like-minded people on Twitter: @insurtechasia.

How to Focus on Emerging Markets: Operational Excellence

Global economic trends will transform the customer base for most industries across the world. Rising per capita incomes, favorable demographics and continuing economic growth are leading to a massive expansion of the emerging middle class.

The World Bank defines the middle class in two brackets based on earnings per day: US$2–US$9 and US$9–US$13. According to the World Bank, 10 times as many people entered the lower versus the higher income bracket between 1990 and 2005— highlighting the success of countries such as India and China that have invested millions in the middle class over the past two decades. For this report, our focus is on 
those earning US$2–US$9 a day, or the “emerging consumer.” We define the “global middle class” as earning an average of US$10–US$100 a day. This level of consumer has more disposable income to buy consumable goods and to invest.

While the remarkable growth of emerging market economies has brought millions out of poverty, fewer people have moved into the global middle class. Over the next two decades, we estimate that the middle class will expand by three billion people, coming almost exclusively from the current low-income segment. Financial inclusion will be important to aid this expansion. The significance of insurance for this low-income customer segment cannot be overstated, particularly given the lack of social health care in these countries. Life insurance supports a family when the breadwinner dies; in-patient hospitalization costs are generally paid for through out-of-pocket expenses and can deplete existing savings. As climate change and natural disasters such as Cyclone Phailin in the Philippines become more prevalent, the importance of asset-backed insurance (e.g., for weather, cattle and livestock) continues to grow.

The importance of insurance

Insurance has clear social value for the emerging consumer. Low-income consumers need to be insulated from risk because they lack the accumulated capital to withstand adverse events. Apart from its advantages as a risk management tool, insurance enables low-income consumers to take calculated risks to emerge from poverty, make wise investments or ensure their families will be provided for in case of an unforeseen event.

As economists Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo point out in their book, Poor Economics, the poor are not irrational in their spending behavior, but rather hyper-rational, because the value of each money unit is higher than for other consumer segments. Thus, insurers should understand some of the key challenges facing these consumers and align their operating models to service them better:

  • Inconsistent cash flows — These consumers often have irregular pay cycles, making premium payments difficult.
  • Significant dependency on a single source of income — Dependence on one main breadwinner may create a financial burden.
  • A mobile segment — Many jobs require long commutes from rural areas and constant mobility; lack of portability and accessibility may hinder the purchase of insurance.
  • Lack of awareness of the concept of insurance — Risk pooling or premium payment benefits that may not accrue to the customer may be difficult concepts to understand.
  • Lack of trust — For some industries, this may lead to reputational issues; these can be more extreme when purchasing an intangible product like insurance.

Despite these challenges, customers spend sleepless nights worrying about various risks. The vulnerability is much greater for this segment than for others with higher disposable income.

How big is this market?

In 2009, there were approximately 1.5 billion–3 billion people with minimal access to formal insurance services globally, as highlighted by Lloyd’s of London. Today’s audience has not changed significantly, but consumers face different risks — related to life, health and assets. ILO’s Microinsurance Innovation Facility believes that insurance for low-income consumers has evolved differently across geographies — from 200% growth between 2008 and 2012 in Africa to a steady evolution in India and other Asian economies.

India has the largest share of low-income consumers with insurance — the result of strong regulation and government schemes, especially in health insurance. South Africa, Kenya, Ghana and Tanzania have been rapidly increasing coverage and developing microinsurance-focused regulations. Asian economies such as Indonesia, the Philippines, Bangladesh and Pakistan continue to grow in this space, as well.

Emerging markets are unique in terms of demographic and economic segmentation. Countries such as India have a more standard income-based segmentation pyramid, whereas other developing countries such as Ghana and Nigeria have a flatter pyramid, with most potential customers in the low-income segment.

Globally, we observe many insurers and intermediaries expanding their sales focus down the pyramid to reach the emerging consumer. Depending on the specific market, some players are servicing the low-income customer segment through simple insurance offerings and third-party distribution. Nevertheless, the vast majority are conventional insurers targeting the current “top” of the pyramid.

Irrespective of the geography, insurers recognize that today’s low-income customers are tomorrow’s middle class. However, winning this customer segment is not just about creating lower-priced products or selling existing products using a third-party distributor such as a micro-finance institution. Insurers will have to learn from the dynamics of their respective markets and drive innovation by transforming their strategies and operating models to grow with emerging consumers and their developing needs.

But is it profitable?

The foremost challenge for insurers in this market
 is the lack of systems and dedicated performance management tools to track profitability. These are often missing because of a lack of investment or simply lack of focus by senior management. The industry segment is young and lacks tracking tools. Insurers usually do not separate performance reporting between traditional and emerging consumer insurance. Future performance management tools need to capture metrics for both revenue and cost to determine the profitability trends for this segment.

Typically, there is a lack of historical risk data for low-income consumers. Thus, pricing is not very scientific and uses proxies with a constant iterative feedback loop. As historical data quality improves, we expect risk-based pricing for this segment will lead to better-priced products.

Insurers are leveraging various technology-enabled channels, such as mobile phones in Africa, to sell these insurance services, thereby reducing distributor and operating expenses. Insurers are also selling life insurance through retailers reusing rechargeable vouchers, thus eliminating the distributor layer and trimming costs significantly. Various government-sponsored insurance schemes have standardized processes for enrollment of new beneficiaries, post-sale servicing and claims management. However, there are no universal measures to reduce market costs — an important objective because insurers need to demonstrate profitability. Those insurers that can redefine their operating models and generate high operational efficiency will reap the benefits of serving this large, untapped and developing customer segment.

Need for greater investment

Insurance companies in emerging markets have typically found it expensive to cater to the emerging consumer. The high cost of acquisition, lack of trust and inaccessibility make outreach difficult. Moreover, many insurers have failed to develop a sound business case, with a low-cost and differentiated operational strategy, to enter these markets.

Insurance for the emerging consumer is still in a nascent stage. While large insurers may be deploying significant capital to penetrate this market, other initiatives have been part of corporate social responsibility or philanthropic programs. Often these projects target specific concerns related to product development, distribution or customer awareness. Such forms of funding do not appear sustainable or scalable for the long term.

Transformational programs are required to achieve operational excellence. This is where investment from insurers or private equity investors (more specifically, impact investors) can bring true value — not just in 
the form of capital, but also technical knowledge and expertise to develop cost-efficient distribution channels and well-designed products, and to drive organizational change for profitability.

As insurers rapidly expand in emerging markets, we see opportunities to help them with specific geographic issues in impact investing, measurement and value generation. We are working together with LeapFrog Investments to reach this virtually untapped market. Their approach is a compelling complement to our broad service lines and global competence.

Effectively targeting emerging consumers

Many insurers have used existing operating models in innovative ways to reach the low-income consumer.
 A large private sector life insurer in India, for example, created a “top-up” life insurance product in 2008, offering low-income consumers pay-as-you-go options. This eliminated scheduled premiums for consumers who typically do not have a steady stream of income.

In addition to our earlier discussion of issues facing consumers, there are three dominant challenges for insurers to consider in developing the emerging consumer market.

  • Awareness — Building customer trust through educational and marketing initiatives; the most convincing way for insurers to build awareness is to deliver on their claims’ promises
  • Affordability — Providing insurance at an affordable price and benefits that the end customer values; this places high importance on product design
  • Accessibility — Ensuring ease in purchasing insurance, servicing and claims handling

These three challenges can be mapped to the following external and internal success factors that will play an important role in developing this market.

External success factors

Regulatory framework

A strong regulatory framework is required to support the industry, and emerging markets have benefited from the regulatory push. India’s insurance regulator was among the world’s first to have quota-based mandates for licensed insurers (requiring them to source a percentage of their business from rural and unorganized markets) and to develop specific regulations for products and distribution. A more principle-based approach is being taken by The National Insurance Commission in Ghana in drafting microinsurance regulations. These enable insurers to innovate with product definitions and distribution tie-ups as they develop affordable and accessible products for the lower-income segment.

Technical and logistical infrastructure

Insurers in emerging markets also face infrastructure-related challenges, requiring local and highly pragmatic business solutions. Typical issues include a lack of options to communicate or interact with customers, no “know your customer” processes and limited payment infrastructure. Leveraging the high mobile penetration, various technology-based solutions
 have emerged. Insurers need flexibility to ensure that insurance sales, post-sale servicing and claims management are quick and efficient.

Intermediaries and partnerships

Distribution is one of the most important concerns. Last-mile connection with customers is a challenge because of a large segment living in inaccessible areas, their constant mobility or simply a lack of access to the same touch points more affluent segments have (e.g., bank branches, financial advisors). Use of traditional distribution channels, such as agents or advisors, can be an expensive proposition because of high commissions and the need to adapt specific requirements for this segment. Furthermore, existing channels are typically not trained to deal with the lower-income consumer. Along with traditional channels that are managed in a lean and cost-efficient manner, there are other successful distribution alternatives in this market that include partner-agent models (e.g., using business correspondents), as well as those created by piggybacking on existing distribution channels (e.g., mobile network operators, retailers).

Internal success factors

Low-cost and efficient operating model

Insurance for low-income consumers is a low-margin business because of lower average premiums per customer and relatively high fixed costs. This makes it more important to run an efficient operating model with simplicity and innovation and to ensure that internal processes are standardized across the organization. Customer interfaces need to be simplified with each customer touch point for consistent communication. The need to leverage technology to achieve these objectives is a given.

Supporting governance structure and performance management framework

Institutional and infrastructural conditions in emerging markets lead to specific requirements in running 
the business, such as decentralized sales or strong interaction with intermediaries. This requires robust governance and risk management structures, which support management steering and enable operational control in critical areas such as quality issues or fraud. In these situations, a well-functioning performance management framework, with operational KPIs and controls, is important to identify issues and react to deviations. This should be embedded across the organizational structure.

Simple and innovative product design

Simple yet innovative product design is critical to increase penetration. Products need to be easily understood by customers, easy for agents or intermediaries to sell and provide real value for the client. Additionally, standardized products will improve operational quality and efficiency, which is critical to running a profitable business in a low-margin segment.

In the next few years, innovative solutions that provide insurance to emerging consumers will include:

  • Selling insurance through a utility company (e.g., Mapfre and Codensa in Colombia)
  • Reaching small businesses for agriculture insurance via mobile phone technology (e.g., Kilimo Salama in East Africa)
  • Integrating products with a telecom provider; outsourcing customer service and premium collection to intermediaries or facilitators (e.g., Bima in Asia and Africa)

Many of these solutions will be independent or integrated services. But insurance companies will drive these innovations, and only those players that are able to develop profitable operating models will succeed. While leveraging third-party providers for various services will be important, insurers still need to focus on their customer relationships and operations to generate maximum value from these third-party relationships.

Customer-centricity, operational efficiency, risk management and performance management will be crucial but will not ensure sustainable success. The most important aspects are corporate culture (change, individual involvement and leadership) and the mindset of people.

For the full report, see: Operational Excellence For Insurers.