Tag Archives: personal risk management

3 Money Mistakes Newlyweds Make

Being a newlywed is awesome. I reflect on that season of my life as one filled with joy and anticipation. Sure, that first year of marriage was full of challenges, enormous adjustments and unexpected changes, but on the whole it was great.

We found such relief in finally being married and out of engagement. Engagement is a funny time. You often take on new priorities and responsibilities you’ve never had before (like part-time event planner), and that can wear on you and the relationship after awhile. Engagement is meant to be a temporary phase in life, and most friends I know, myself included, have been thrilled to see an end to it — the lists, planning, preparation, etc. In the midst of all of the planning and celebrating, the topic of money is often overlooked (aside from the wedding budget). Yet studies tell us money is a top cause of conflict and divorce among couples. Money can be hard to talk about. Our culture has made money-talk a taboo subject, which can make it all the more difficult to start talking about money (regularly) with another person, especially if you were used to keeping your money matters private for so many years.

Here are a few money mistakes I see newlyweds make. Regardless of how long you’ve been married, though, it’s always important to check in and make sure you’re not letting the important things fall by the wayside.

1. Forgetting to Update Important Plans and Documents

When you start a job and enroll in your employer’s various benefits, you are prompted to assign beneficiaries to things like your 401(k), group life insurance, even an emergency contact in some instances. Getting married means it’s time to review these beneficiary designations.

You should also review current insurance policies and see if you need to add your spouse to the plan or review your coverage entirely. If you are both on individual health insurance plans through work, it’s worth comparing the cost of keeping your individual plans versus one of you joining the other’s plan. It’s possible you’ll save money by being on the same plan. When evaluating the cost, consider monthly premiums, deductibles, co-insurance and co-pays.

If you happen to have estate-planning documents like wills, health care proxies, living wills, etc., these documents also warrant review and updating when you get married.

2. Overlooking the Need to Get Organized

I know, it’s one more administrative thing that’s not fun to think about or act on, but it is important to be organized. If you don’t talk about it, habits will naturally form, and you’ll likely end up with unnecessary confusion and stress, which can lead to conflict. Don’t be scrappy with your finances. I survive by being scrappy as a parent (I’m a mom of two toddlers). But this ability doesn’t translate as well with finances.

Try this: Sit down and list out all the accounts each of you have and then talk about which accounts you want to join, leave separate, combine, close, etc. Simplicity is a wonderful thing. Decide which account(s) you’ll use for routine expenses, where you’ll keep your emergency savings, longer-term savings and investments. Even if you plan to keep accounts separate, have this conversation so it’s intentional and there’s no confusion about how bills and shared expenses will be handled.

You can also make your credit reports a part of this process — so you both have an understanding of each other’s credit history, and create a plan for building better credit, or maintaining your great credit if you have it. If you’re not familiar with your credit reports, you may find them to be overwhelming at first — here’s a guide to deciphering your credit report. You can get your free credit reports once a year from each of the three major credit reporting agencies, and you can get a free credit report summary on Credit.com, updated monthly.

3. Avoiding Money Talks

Money is a leading cause of conflict and stress for couples, which can be enough to discourage some people from discussing the topic at all. If you learn to talk about money early on (especially when times are good and emotions aren’t running high), you’ll be prepared when money issues arise.

Talking about money feels like creating a new habit. Sometimes you just have to start doing it, even before you’re comfortable doing so, and allow the habit to take shape.

Here are a few starting points for your conversations about money:

  • Your history with money (What lessons about money did you learn as a child?)
  • Current stress points with money
  • Goals you hope to achieve with your money
  • Expectations for your current lifestyle and how you want to use your money
  • Spending habits (Where do you spend money the easiest, with most resistance?)

A Word of Encouragement

Financial unity and stability with your spouse is a process. You don’t have to have all the answers or all of the kinks worked out from the beginning.

If you and your spouse have different approaches to money, (how you spend versus save, what you value, etc.), this doesn’t have to mean never-ending conflict. It’s possible you both need to learn to compromise, and pushing each other toward a middle ground may be the healthiest thing for both of you. And that’s one of the great benefits of marriage — the messy but beautiful process of refining each other and growing together in ways you never could alone.

This article originally appeared on Credit.com and was written by Julie Ford.

Waiting for Your Disability Benefits?

If you are suffering from an injury or illness that is preventing you from working, it’s likely you have lost a livable income, and you may be facing the threat of economic hardship. Many people, who are unable to work due to a serious illness or injury, are able to receive Social Security benefits as compensation. But, according to John C. Shea, a disability lawyer in Richmond, VA, applying for Social Security benefits is often a long and arduous process, whether because you are gathering all of your medical documents, making sure you ask all the right questions or patiently waiting to hear if you qualify,.

The Waiting Period and Financial Help

Once you have applied and are waiting for a response as to whether you qualify for benefits, the Social Security Administration (SSA) reports that the decision process can take anywhere from three to five months (keep in mind that the process can take even longer if you’re initially denied and file an appeal). Waiting nearly half a year is not “financially doable” for most individuals. Here are some helpful tips for getting financial help while waiting for SSA’s answer:

  • Are You Able to Work?: In some cases, individuals seeking SSDI benefits may be able to work, but there limitations on how much you can earn. Chances are, your illness or injury may limit your ability/length of time to work, anyway. If you’re interested in working, even very part-time while applying for SSDI benefits, it’s a good idea to talk to SSA; to avoid any extra issues or confusion, consult with a disability lawyer.
  • Apply for Supplemental Programs: If your life is put on hold due to a life-changing illness or injury, unfortunately, your needs and expenses won’t take a break. Groceries and other utilities are life essentials but are often big financial expenses. If you’re running into financial problems, rather than skipping bills and risking having your heat or electricity shut off, consider applying for energy assistance and take a look at programs like SNAP for food assistance.
  • Creating a Budget and Cutting Expenses: Downsizing on your monthly budget may be one of the easiest ways to save you some money while waiting for SSDI benefits. Although you may not want to give up certain “luxuries” like cable television or your costly cell phone plan, making some budget cuts here and there may save you hundreds of dollars a month. It’s also a good idea, while planning out your budget, to look ahead as much as a year. While SSA’s decision may take a few months, you may encounter some discrepancies that lengthen the process.

Accept Assistance

Asking for and accepting help can be difficult, especially if you’re struggling to come to terms with a lengthy illness or injury. If a friend or family offers to help you, strongly consider accepting the offer. Whether you insist on treating the help as a loan or a gift, the offer can help keep you financially afloat while you wait for your benefits.

retirement

75% of People Not on Track for Retirement

A new study shows that three in four Canadians are not on track for retirement. With the recent economic turmoil, many working Canadians are struggling to make ends meet as it is. The same survey indicated that half the population is living paycheck to paycheck, and very few have any emergency savings built up. Living in the moment means that they’re not focused on retirement goals, and many expect to be working several more years as a result.

Although workplace pensions, the Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS), Old Age Security (OAS) and the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) can provide funds, it’s often not enough. Moreover, the higher your income is now, the less likely you are to have your future needs met by these types of programs. If you’re among the 75% who are not on track to retire, here are the changes you need to make now:

Take a Hard Look at the Money Coming In

You’ll need to set a budget, but long before you get to it you must have a full accounting of how much money is coming into the household. Then, you’ll need to deduct between 20% and 30% of the gross for emergency expenses and retirement. Focus on building emergency savings that will cover you for three to six months first.

Eliminate Bad Debts

Carrying a balance for a mortgage or vehicle isn’t usually a problem, but more and more Canadians are maxing out credit cards and racking up other smaller debts. These things should also be knocked out of the way first.

Say Goodbye to Luxury Spending

While the older population is much better at assessing value and affordability, the younger generation is geared toward luxury items. Expensive cars, lavish clothing and trending technology add to debt. If you aren’t on track for retirement, and you’re carrying unnecessary debts, you should get yourself back on track and only purchase essential and value-oriented products.

Reevaluate Your Investment Choices

Unfortunately, many investment firms take a chunk of payments, and they fail to deliver in returns. Do a cost-benefit analysis and see if you need to consider moving your money to another firm or program. Diversification, both on a local and international level, is essential, as it provides a kind of insurance in case the economy falters. Think beyond stocks, as well. Bonds, commodities and real estate holdings can provide extra layers of security.

Use a Budgeting Program

There are numerous options available, but they all serve the same essential function. Using software or an app to track expenses takes the brainwork out of it and enables you to stick to your budget without having to work so hard.

Incrementally Increase Retirement Savings

As you pay off your debts and eliminate your mortgage, and your children become self-sufficient, you’ll obviously have more money to spend on yourself. Many people jump into doing the things they’ve been holding off on, like vacations and home remodels, but this becomes a slippery slope. As you find yourself free of expenses and debts, it’s imperative to increase your retirement savings, as well. During your last decade or two of work, your goal should be buildings toward setting aside 60% of your income for retirement. Some of the cash should go into savings, but a fair amount should be invested into dividend-paying stocks, which will add a steady trickle of supplemental cash as your non-working days progress.

Reevaluate Your Goals and Get Expert Advice

Even though most people can benefit from visiting with a financial planner, very few people do. You don’t have to be wealthy to benefit from one, either. A financial planner can help you figure out ways to minimize debts and how to save and may be able to help you get lower interest rates on the debts you already carry. If you choose not to visit a financial planner, you should still reevaluate your budget and strategy on a regular basis. This way, you can find ways to increase your savings if you aren’t setting aside enough, or enjoy more of your income now, provided you’re on track for retirement.

There was a time when a person could outright retire at a certain age, but it’s not like that any more. Today’s workers have to contribute more on their own to be able to maintain the same standard of living, and they have to work longer to be prepared. It’s still possible to retire at about the age your parents and grandparents did, but it requires more planning on your part.

What Happened to Insurance Distribution?

A bright market pundit could probably offer up her ideas on just which day it was that insurance distribution fell markedly out of sync with retail technology and consumer expectations. Was it the day Amazon was launched? Was it the day that the first app was purchased on the app store? Did it involve Google search engine optimization or the switch from print to email or social media marketing?

It is interesting and a little painful to think about, but most experts would say that, of course, it wasn’t just one day or one event. It has been building slowly, silently and stealthily…where the insurance industry allowed the friction of change to impede modernization and place itself at risk. Shifting consumer mindsets and rapidly evolving markets, like tectonic pressures, built up along a fault line, and then one day the ground shakes.

And it didn’t stop shaking.

Now the industry is waking up and finding itself on a precipice in the midst of continual, seismic shifts. A new business environment has arrived. The environment is different because of the complexity, breadth and depth of converging factors and global changes. To an industry steeped in centuries of tradition, this new business environment represents significant disruption. The shifting and realigning of fundamental elements of the business require us to erase the idea that we can ease our organizations into the new era with minor adjustments. Instead, we need to match the rhythm of perpetual aftershocks with a model that sways to the beat of a new agenda.

We need to reinvent the insurance business model so that it is built to predict seismic activity and capture future opportunities. Today’s insurers are moving from product-driven to customer-driven strategies; from reliance on limited distribution channels (such as agents) to an array of channels based on customer choice; from line of business silos to customer experience threads for all products across all lines; from simply containing risk to providing personal risk management; and from siloed solutions focused on transactions to a platform portfolio that bridges together real-time interaction across all products and services for customers, giving them an Amazon-like experience.

Together the changes represent a disruption in the industry’s traditional market rhythm. The industry’s response demands two concerted efforts:

  • First, it requires optimizing the front end with a digital platform that orchestrates customer engagement across multiple channels.
  • Second, this multi-channel environment must be supported by an optimized back-end that effectively manages the growing array and complexity of multiple distribution channels beyond the traditional agent channel.

Together, these two efforts compose a “2D Strategy” for insurers to succeed in this new business environment of customer engagement and channel choice. What composes the 2D Strategy? It is simply digital and distribution. Majesco’s new thought leadership report, “A 2D Strategy: Distribution and Digital for High Performance,” discusses this two-pronged strategy in more detail.

But first, let’s spend some time diagnosing the developments that have led the industry to this point. We see four fundamental drivers:

• New expectations are being set by other industries; the “Amazon effect”
• New products are needed to meet new needs and risks distributed in new channels
• Channel options are expanding
• Lines are blurring between insurance and other industries

New Expectations

Customer expectations based on their experiences with other companies and industries are setting a new bar for customer experience and are a key driver in expanding distribution choice. What are these companies doing that customers like so much? Fundamentally they offer choice, create delight and surprise and make both a personalized and emotional connection.

– Amazon and Netflix have a huge variety of products and use data and analytics very well to know what customers would like, before they even know it themselves.
– Southwest makes things simple and transparent and has a great culture that creates a welcoming environment for customers.
– Google is the very essence of surprise and delight – every time you do a search you never know what you’ll find.
– Costco customers experience a “thrill of discovery” every time they go there and have access to “members only” deals on a large variety of products and services – including insurance. Availability creates a seamless line between online and in-store.
– Apple designs all of its products and services to create a feeling of simplicity, function and elegance and makes shopping, buying and servicing available through multiple channels.

Underpinning these new expectations is the use of technology, with mobile as a key enabler. Why? Simply put, mobile empowers customers. It used to be called the third screen (behind TV and the PC), but now it’s the first screen. Pew says that 68% of all American adults have a smartphone now, and some younger age groups are hitting saturation levels. Other studies show that more than 40% of organic search engine traffic now comes from mobile devices, and 50% of insurance shoppers start their shopping process using mobile.

We frequently talk about mobile enabling ANYTIME and ANYWHERE interactions. Recent Google research quantified the times and places consumers use mobile for researching and purchasing products. Usage levels generally increase as the day progresses, peaking in the late evening. But if you look at the first two and last two parts of the day together, an estimated 46% of mobile research time is spent in the early morning, late evening or when customers are in bed — not an ideal time to meet with an insurance agent. A majority of this activity is done at home, but almost as much is done outside of the home.

Customer experiences created by other companies and customer empowerment created by technology are powerful forces shaping customer expectations and driving the need for insurance companies to adopt a 2D strategy. In my next blog I’ll explore the other drivers on our list: new products, expanding channel options and blurring industry lines.

Rental Car Waiver: To Buy or Not to Buy?

When I Googled “should I buy the rental car damage waiver, I got 40.6 million hits. Needless to say, much has been written about this issue. But much of what has been written is BAD (aka horrible and dangerous) advice.

If you have auto insurance, is that good enough? What about credit card coverage? This article explores the issues and suggests some answers, at least one of which you might not like. (Note: This article builds on an article I first published in 1998, titled “Top 10 Reasons to Purchase the Rental Car Damage Waiver.”]

The vast majority of consumer articles suggest that the purchase of the loss damage waiver (LDW) is not necessary if you have auto insurance or credit card coverage. For example, in a 2014 article in U.S. News & World Reports titled “7 Costly Car Rental Mistakes to Avoid,” the very first “mistake” involves buying insurance you don’t need. The article says your auto insurance policy “may” cover collision and quotes someone who says, “The credit card coverage will kick in for anything your personal policy doesn’t cover.” Needless to say, “may” and “will” are two different things.

While many auto policies and some credit cards may provide coverage for damage to a rental car, it is almost certainly not complete, and four- to five-figure uncovered losses are not at all uncommon. The purchase of the LDW (with caveats), along with auto insurance, provides a belt and suspenders approach to risk managing the rental car exposure.

Let’s explore the value and deficiencies of auto insurance, credit card coverage and loss damage waivers.

Personal Auto Policies

In the article I wrote in 1998 and have since updated, I enumerate many reasons why buying the loss damage waiver is a good idea. I won’t repeat those reasons in their entirety, but I’ll highlight the more important issues that have resulted in uncovered claims that I’m personally aware of, based on more than 20 years of managing such issues. We’ll start with the current 2005 ISO Personal Auto Policy (PAP) as the basis of our discussion, with some references to non-ISO auto policies.

The ISO PAP extends physical damage coverage to private passenger autos, pickups, vans and trailers you don’t own if at least one declared auto on your policy has such physical damage coverage. But physical damage coverage does not extend to a motor home, moving truck, motorcycle, etc. that you are renting.

Damage valuation is on an actual cash value (ACV) basis, while most rental agreements require coverage for “full value” (translation: whatever the rental car company says is the value), and most PAPs exclude any “betterment” in value.

Many non-ISO PAPs have an exclusion or dollar limitation on non-owned autos or specific types of rental vehicles such that rental, for example, of an upscale SUV or sports car may have limited or even no coverage.

Many PAPs limit or do not cover the rental company’s loss of rental income on a damaged auto. There is often an option to provide increased limits for this coverage, but many price-focused consumers may decline such coverage. Even where this coverage is provided, many insurers may only be willing to pay for the usage indicated by fleet logs while the rental agency wants the full daily rental value. In one claim, the renter was charged $2,000 more than his insurer was willing to pay. In another claim involving a luxury car that was stolen from his hotel parking lot, the renter was hit with the maximum daily rental rate of $300, for a total loss of use charge of $9,000 (that he negotiated down to $4,500). In still another claim, following the 2011 tsunami that hit Japan, replacement parts for a rental car were unavailable for several months, and the renter incurred a $6,000 loss-of-use charge by the rental car company.

Probably the most significant deficiency in the PAP is the lack of coverage for diminished value claims. That’s the #1 reason I always buy the LDW. I’m personally aware of uncovered diminished value charges of $3,000, $5,000, $7,000 and $8,000 and read about one from a reliable source that totaled $15,000 on an upscale SUV rental.

In one case, a Florida insured traveled to Colorado for a rock-climbing vacation. He passed on purchasing the LDW for his four-day rental because “I’m an excellent driver, and I’ve got car insurance and credit card coverage.” Apparently, the driver of the vehicle that sideswiped his rental car while it was parked was not an excellent driver. The damage totaled $4,400 for repairs, $370 for administrative fees, $620 for loss of use and $3,100 in diminished value. Of the $8,490 total, $3,990 was uninsured and not covered by his credit card, the biggest component being the $3,100 diminished value charge. In addition, the driver ended up having to hire a Colorado attorney to assist in resolving the claim. The cost of the LDW for the entire trip would have been less than $100, a small fraction of the total cost of his vacation trip.

When insureds travel on business or vacation, a rental car is often valet-parked at a hotel or restaurant. The ISO PAP extends physical damage coverage for non-owned autos “while in the custody of or being operated by you or any ‘family member’.” So, the question is whether the vehicle is still in the custody of the insured while it’s being valet-parked or otherwise in the custody of the valet service. If you don’t know and you’re relying on your PAP for coverage, the best advice is probably to not valet-park a rental car.

There are many other deficiencies in the ISO PAP that apply, and you can read about them in the previously mentioned “Top 10” article on our website. The last point I’ll make is a reminder that the majority of auto policies in the marketplace are not “ISO-standard” forms. (To learn more about that, Google “independent agent magazine price check.”) Despite what you may be led to believe by auto insurance advertisements or articles that imply that all auto policies and insurers are the same, there are potentially catastrophic differences, including coverage deficiencies with regard to rental cars. There are unendorsed non-ISO policies that don’t cover non-owned autos, period; others that exclude business use of such autos or non-private passenger vehicles (this one shows up in policies of major national carriers, not just “nonstandard” auto insurers); others that exclude vehicles that weigh more than 10,000 pounds; and so on.

Conclusion? An auto policy simply is not adequate to cover the rental car physical damage exposure.

Credit Card Coverages

Read a few of the many articles on the Internet about using credit card programs to fund damage to rental cars, and you would think that little more is needed to adequately address the exposure. Unfortunately, credit card programs have as many, or more, deficiencies as does the PAP alone. Anyone relying on auto insurance and credit cards would be well-advised to study the credit card programs. In his article, “Rental Car Agreements, LDWs, PAPs, and Credit Cards,” David Thompson, CPCU writes:

“Many major credit cards provide some limited, free coverage for rental cars. Most post the provisions related to rental cars on the card issuer’s web site. While these can run several pages, three specific conditions [that] limit, restrict or invalidate the free coverage are show-stoppers. For example:

“The following conditions limit, restrict, void or invalidate the auto rental damage waiver (DW) coverage provided by your credit card:

“(1) This auto rental DW supplements, and applies as excess of, any valid and collectible insurance. For coverage to apply, you must decline the DW offered by the rental company.

“(2) The following losses are not covered by this auto rental DW coverage: (a) Any loss [that] violated the rental agreement of the rental company; (b) Any claim for diminished value of the rental car.

“(3) Any loss or damage to certain types of vehicles—see list.”

In other words, (1) credit card coverage is excess over ANY collectible insurance, (2) you must decline the rental company’s LDW, (3) violation of the rental agreement precludes coverage, (4) like the PAP, there is no coverage for diminished value, which we’ve seen can total thousands of dollars and (5) certain types of vehicles are excluded. Excluded vehicles may include pick-up trucks, full- sized vans and certain luxury cars.

And these are only part of the full list of limitations often found in these programs. Another common limitation is that loss of use is only paid to the extent that the assessment is based on fleet utilization logs. One major credit card only covers collision and theft even though the rental agreement typically makes the user almost absolutely liable for all damage, including fire, flood and vandalism. Some credit cards offer broader optional protection plans, but typically they also exclude coverage if there is a violation of the rental agreement and don’t cover diminished value.

Another issue with reliance on credit cards is that the rental company may charge uncovered fees that max out the credit limit on the card. If you’re 1,000 miles from home on vacation with a maxed-out credit card, that can present problems.

Loss Damage Waivers

Many people don’t buy the rental car company’s LDW because they think they have “full coverage” between their auto policy and credit cards. Many see what can be a significant charge and choose not to buy the LDW on the premise, “This’ll never happen to me.”

I rarely rent cars on business trips or vacation, but I experienced a major claim with a hit-and-run in a restaurant parking lot the night before a 6 a.m. flight. I had bought the $12.95 LDW for my four-day trip, so I simply turned in the vehicle at the airport with little more than a shrug.

Thompson, who rents cars fairly often, says he has walked away from damaged cars three times. Returning a rental at the Ft. Lauderdale airport, Thompson asked the attendant how many cars a month are returned with damage. She responded that, in her typical 12-hour shift, 15 cars are returned with damage and, in most cases, the damage was allegedly caused by someone else, not the renter. She estimated that only about 15% of renters buy the LDW.

The cost of the LDW admittedly can be significant, especially if you extrapolate what the effective physical damage insurance cost would be at that daily rate. But that’s only one way to view the investment in peace of mind, not to mention the avoidance of what can be significant claims.

On an eight-day vacation last year, the LDW cost me more than the actual rental and, in fact, more than my airline ticket. But I considered the LDW part of the cost of the vacation.

Is the LDW all you need? Is it foolproof? Well, kind of, as long as you follow the rental agreement. If you violate the rental agreement, you are likely to void the LDW. Many rental agreements consider the following to be violations:

  • Driving on an unpaved road or off-road (often the case in state or national parks or states like Alaska and Hawaii).
  • Operation while impaired by alcohol or drugs.
  • Any illegal use (parking violations?), reckless driving, racing or pushing or towing another vehicle.
  • Use outside a designated territorial limit.
  • Operation by an unauthorized driver.

This illustrates the advantage of using the belt and suspenders approach of the PAP plus the LDW. The ISO PAP does not exclude the first three rental agreement violations, and the territorial limit is usually broader than any restrictive rental agreement territory outside of Mexico.

As for unauthorized drivers, some rental companies may automatically include a spouse or fellow employee or authorize them to drive for a fee. More often, the renter never reads the rental agreement and presumes anyone on the trip can drive. In one claim, a father and son were on vacation, and the father rented a car. The son had a driver’s license but was too young under the rental agreement to drive the car. The rental clerk made this clear at the time of rental. Despite knowing this, the father allowed the son to drive, and he wrecked the vehicle. Not only was the LDW voided, the father’s non-ISO PAP excluded the claim because the son was not permitted to drive the car.

A special case of unauthorized drivers could be-valet parking at a hotel or restaurant. Some agreements might except valet parking, so it’s important to determine at the time of rental whether valet parking is covered.

A note on third-party LDWs: In 2011, a fellow CPCU rented a car through Orbitz or Expedia, which offered an LDW at the time of the reservation. He mistakenly assumed this was the same LDW offered by the rental car company, but it was underwritten by a separate entity. During his trip, the rental car was damaged by a deer on a rural Montana road. To make a long story short, the third-party LDW was not a true “no liability” LDW warranty of the type offered by the rental car agency, and the result was, after negotiations on the uncovered portion of the charges (including diminished value), he had to pay in excess of $1,000 out of pocket.

Conclusions

When I rent a car on a business trip or vacation, I price the rental to include the LDW and make my decision, in part, on that basis. The peace of mind alone is invaluable, and, again, I consider the cost to be comparable to my decision to stay in a decent, secure hotel.

If you rent cars frequently, consider negotiating a price including LDW with one or more rental car agencies. Otherwise, caveat emptor. If you are an insurance professional giving advice to consumers about whether to purchase the LDW, it would likely be in your and your customer’s best interest to recommend consideration of the LDW. Your E&O insurer will appreciate it.