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New Power Shift in P&C Insurance

P&C insurance carriers have witnessed a lot of changes in the past decade, but few have been as surprising as the shift of power currently taking place across the industry.

According to Dennis Chookaszian, the former CEO and chair of CNA, carriers maintain only 40% of profits today, representing a drop of 20 to 25 points from the 1960s. An equal share now goes to the distribution system, as carriers line up to acquire and maintain more customers.

What’s behind this shift in profitability can’t be summed up in a single word, but increasing competition, new market entrants, improving technology, changing customer expectations and continued consumer price sensitivity all play a role.

To remain competitive, carriers will need to gain more control over distribution, a goal that even Chookaszian admits will not be easy to achieve.

Why the Power-Shift Toward Distribution

In the mid-part of the last decade, insurance carriers required two primary competencies to operate: data and capital. Because neither was easy to acquire, competition was less robust, and incumbent carriers found greater profitability, taking in roughly two-thirds of insurance transaction profits.

Today, data is everywhere, and through the use of analytics, simpler than ever to understand and use. Capital is also easier to acquire, as is evidenced by the growing number of insurtech players in the industry. According to Willis Towers Watson, $2.3 billion was invested in new insurance tech companies in 2017.

According to Chookaszian, the core competency for insurers now lies in distribution and control of the customer.

“It’s become so competitive that the carriers basically are always out looking for new accounts,” Chookaszian says.

That means higher commissions are paid to agents as carriers battle it out for market share, resulting in shrinking margins.

“Given the shift in profitability to distribution, the carriers that will be better off will try to regain some control over distribution,” Chookaszian says.

Admittedly, that is not an easy thing to do. The agent enterprise is part and parcel of most insurance operations. Directly selling insurance to consumers will require insurers to set up their own distribution systems, while still supporting their vast networks of independent or captive agent forces.

See also: The Future of P&C Distribution  

Distribution Goes Digital

When Benjamin Franklin started the first successful U.S.-based insurance company in 1752, he was dealing with a localized Philadelphia population, but, by the end of the 18th century, citizens were moving westward, making it necessary for insurers to expand their distribution networks.

The Hartford made the first foray into direct distribution by offering insurance through the mail, but few consumers of the time were willing to give up the personal services of an agent when it came to purchasing something as critical as insurance. Carriers of the time faced a similar dilemma as carriers do today: how to acquire customers in a changing marketplace.

According to the J.D. Power 2018 US. Insurance Shopping Study, insurers are aggressively courting customers with new options and amenities as auto insurance rates remain stagnant and the number of consumers seeking coverage declines.

“We’re entering an era of consumer-centric insurance that will likely be marked by a surge in new digital offerings and serious efforts by insurers to improve the auto insurance shopping experience,” says Tom Super, director of the property and casualty insurance practice at J.D. Power.

This shift is happening across all lines of coverage, even small commercial.

While citizens on the new 17th-century frontier may have been hesitant to buy coverage without the guidance of an agent, many 21st-century buyers have no such qualms. Nearly half of consumers responding to a survey conducted by Clearsurance said that they would purchase an insurance policy online, while 65% believe this will be the primary channel for purchasing coverage within the next five years.

According to research conducted by Accenture, consumers are open to a number of new possibilities when it comes to buying the policies they need:

Power in the form of profits may have shifted to distribution, but consumers are making a power play of their own, demanding greater service and amenities and taking their business to the carrier most capable of meeting preferences and price points. In a world of shifting power, creating an active, online distribution channel puts more of the profit back into the carrier’s bottom line and allows it to attract more customers in three distinct ways.

Cutting Transaction Costs

According to a report from the Geneva Association, the leading international insurance think tank for strategically important insurance and risk management issues, 40% of P&C premiums are absorbed by transaction costs, leading to inflated policy pricing that drives away potential customers. PwC pegs distribution as a heavy culprit, reporting that 30% of the cost of an insurance product is eaten up in distribution.

On the other hand, Bain predicts that insurers could cut the cost of acquisition by as much as 43% through digitalization. Underwriting expenses could drop as much as 53%.

Reducing these costs allows insurers to present a more attractively priced product to consumers, an important consideration given that 50% of customers base their loyalty with an insurer on price.

To understand how costs are reduced through digital distribution, it helps to understand how a leading digital distribution platform works to raise efficiency. According to PwC, up to 80% of the underwriting process can be consumed by administrative tasks that require manual workarounds, such as re-entering information into multiple systems.

Much of this re-inputting of data is due to the siloed nature of insurers’ administration systems. Digital distribution platforms create a layer between the front-end online storefront, where customers enter application data, and the back-end systems used to store information.

As consumers enter their personal details into the online application, all back-end systems are populated automatically, eliminating the need for manual work-arounds. Everyone across the organization has the same view of the customer and access to any information that has been provided.

Digital platforms are also masters of straight-through processing, automating the quote-to-issue lifecycle and reducing the need for manual underwriting. By automatically quoting, binding and issuing routine policies, insurers reduce costs and also provide a more “informed basis for pricing and loss evaluation,” according to PwC.

As costs drop, insurers are also able to more competitively price insurance coverage. Lower prices win more customers allowing insurers to take back some of the profitability of distribution.

Improving Customer Experiences

When it comes to insurer-insured relationships, there is a gap between what consumers want and what insurers provide. Consumers rate the following points as very important aspects of the insurance buying experience:

  • Clear and easy information on policies
  • Access to information whenever it is needed
  • Ability to compare rates and switch plans
  • A wide range of services

But few consumers agree their insurer is meeting these expectations:

27% see clear and easy information on policies

29% report access to information whenever they need it

21% say there is the ability to compare rates and switch plans

24% see a wide range of services

The customer experience is becoming a key differentiator across the insurance industry. McKinsey reports two to four times higher growth and 30% higher profitability for insurers that provide best-in-class customer service, but here’s the rub. Only the top quartile of carriers fall into this category.

Becoming a customer experience leader requires insurers to understand that the separate functions associated with policy sales and distribution appear as a single journey to consumers. They expect to quote, bind and issue multiple policies through a single application, using as many channels as they feel necessary to get the job done.

While 80% of consumers touch a digital channel at least once during an insurance transaction, 45% of auto insurance shoppers use multiple channels when making a purchase. They expect to be recognized across these channels, picking up in one where they left off in another.

The multiple back-end systems employed by most insurers present a strategic dilemma here, as well as in the area of cost containment. Without transparency between channels, consumers are forced to restart a transaction every time they change their engagement method.

“It amounts to a great deal of frustration for the consumer,” says Tom Hammond, president U.S. operations, BOLT. “You start an application online and then call the customer-facing call center, and they can’t see what you did through the online storefront.”

Hammond explains that digital distribution needs to be omni-channel distribution, seamlessly integrated with a single view of the customer. It’s the only way to meet consumer experience expectations now and into the future.

Thanks to advances in analytics and artificial intelligence, the amount of data that is available to carriers has grown significantly, and consumers expect that information to be leveraged for their benefit. Eighty percent of consumers want personalized offers and pricing from their insurers.

Progressive is one of the 22% of carriers currently making strides to offer personalized, real-time digital services, having recently released HomeQuote Explorer. From an app or computer, consumers can enter information once and receive side-by-side comparisons from multiple homeowners insurance providers. According to the company, they leverage a network of home insurers to make sure customers can find the coverage they need at a comfortable price.

Oliver Lauer, head of architecture/head of IT innovation at Zurich, believes these collaborative networks are an integral part of the digital future of insurance.

“Digital innovation means you have to develop your insurance company to an open and digitally enabled platform that can interface with everybody every time in real time – from customers to brokers, to other insurers, but also to fintechs and insurtechs,” Lauer says.

Using a digitally enabled market network, insurers can fill product gaps and even meet customer needs when they don’t have an appetite for the risk. The premise is simple. By offering coverage from other insurers, they maintain the customer relationship and reap the rewards of loyalty.

As society changes and consumer needs evolve, the ability to personalize bundled coverage to the needs of the individual will become increasingly important. Consumers are now looking for coverage to mitigate risk in previously unheard-of areas, such as cyber security, identity theft and even activities related to legalized marijuana.

When an insurer is unable to provide the coverage a customer needs, it risks forfeiting that relationship, and any other policies bundled with it, to another carrier. But when the carrier takes part in a market network, it can bundle the appropriate coverage from another insurer with its own products, personalizing the coverage to better fit the needs of the customer.

See also: Key Strategic Initiatives in P&C  

Digital platforms offering market networks also set the stage for insurers to offer ancillary services, such as roadside assistance, that make their insurance products more attractive to consumers. We see this happening with increasing frequency as carriers seek to improve the customer experience and lift their acquisition efforts.

DMC Insurance, a provider of commercial transportation insurance solutions, recently announced a partnership with BlackBerry Radar. The venture would provide transportation companies with real-time data on vehicle location, as well as cargo-related information, such as temperature, humidity, door status and load state. Information like this will help companies better manage risk.

In the personal lines market, insurers are partnering to offer services that enhance the life of their customers. Allstate’s partnership with OpenBay allows consumers to review repair shops and schedule an appointment from an app. Allianz is helping home owners safeguard properties by partnering with Panasonic on sensors that monitor home functions and report issues. Customers can even schedule repairs through the service.

Digital Distribution Benefits All

J.D. Power reveals that digital insurers are winning the intense battle for market share in the insurance industry, starting a shift that could help level the profitability field between distributors and carriers. In a recent insurance shopper survey, overall satisfaction was six points higher for digital insurers over those that sell through independent agents. This lead grows to 12 points when compared with carriers with exclusive agents.

According to research by IDC, digital succeeds on the strength of its data. The ability to collect and analyze the vast stores of data available through these interactions, including such variables as the time of day the consumer shopped for coverage, the channel the consumer used, and stores of information collected from third-parties as part of the automated application process, provides the key to improved customer service.

“By analyzing this data, insurers can understand each customer’s lifestyle, behaviors and preferences in order to engage with them at the right time and place, offer personalized service and offers and more,” says Andy Hirst, vice president of banking solutions, SAP Banking Industry Business Unit.

As insurers create omni-channel engagement, they’re strengthening distribution from every angle, giving consumers the option to quote coverage online when it’s most convenient for them, and then buy it right then and there or to seamlessly call an agent to discuss their options and their risk.

Customer experience is rapidly becoming the foundation of success in the industry, and digital distribution provides the first link in building that base of core customer satisfaction. By providing consumers with multiple channels of engagement and the ability to meet more of their needs at any time, day or night, carriers are taking back the lead on profitability.

Commercial Insurers Face Tough Times

Beyond the secular forces we described in our “Future of Insurance” series, more immediate and cyclical issues will be shaping the insurance executive agenda in 2016. Commercial insurers (including reinsurers) face tough times ahead, with underwriting margins that are being pressured by softening prices and a potentially volatile interest rate environment.

Recently, reserve releases, generally declining frequency and severity trends, as well as lower-than-average catastrophe losses have allowed commercial insurers to report generally strong underwriting results. However, redundant reserves are being (or have been) depleted, and the odds of a continued benign catastrophe environment are low. For example, one insurance executive recently observed, “The odds of this long of a lucky streak occurring is less than 1%.”

The commercial insurance market has, in recent years, had generally strong underwriting results, but this could change—potentially, very soon.

With varying degrees of focus, commercial P&C insurers have been mitigating the risk environment by taking a variety of strategic actions. In 2016 and beyond, they will need to accelerate their strategic efforts in four key areas: 1) core systems and data quality, 2) new products, pricing discipline and terms and conditions, 3) corporate development and 4) talent management.

Core systems and data quality

93% of insurance CEOs—a higher percentage than anywhere else in financial services—see data mining and analysis as more strategically important for their business than any other digital technology. Nevertheless, many commercial insurers operate with networks of legacy systems that complicate the timely extraction and analysis of data. This is no longer deemed acceptable, and leading insurers continue to transform their system environments as a result. Significantly, these transformations do not focus solely on specific systems for policy administration, claims, finance, etc.

To ensure timely quality data across the entire commercial P&C value chain, commercial insurers also focus on how the various systems are integrated with one another.

To put this into context, when a dollar of premium is collected, it not only “floats” across time until it is paid out in claims, it also “floats” across a variety of functions and their related systems: Billing systems process premium dollars; ceded reinsurance systems process treaty and facultative transactions; policy administration systems (PAS) process endorsement changes; claims systems process indemnity and expense payments.

Actuarial systems in disconnected data environments prevent the timely and efficient extraction and analysis of internal data and also complicate the focused and efficient use of external data, especially unstructured data. “Big data” is becoming increasingly popular considering the insights that insurers and reinsurers can derive from it. However, such insights only become actionable to the extent that companies can assess the external environment in the context of the internal environment—in other words, to the extent that big data can enhance (or otherwise inform) the internal data’s findings.

If all functional and systemic codes are not rationalized on an enterprise-wide basis, it is very difficult to efficiently accumulate and analyze data.

New products, pricing discipline and terms and conditions

Commercial insurers and reinsurers are not generally known as product innovators, but they can be. For example, as the profile of cyber-related risks increases, the need for cyber-related commercial insurance grows, thereby offering numerous opportunities for product innovation.

Because cyber is a relatively new exposure, frequency and severity data are nascent, therefore both pricing and risk accumulation models are in various stages of development. As a result, prescient insurers are carefully tracking and comparing their cyber pricing practices and coverage grants with those of key competitors. To be effective, such practices should be consistent with existing price, terms and conditions and monitoring processes. For example, tracking actual-to-expected premiums and rates is a common practice, which leading insurers perform regularly (i.e., at least quarterly, with monthly tracking common).

Insights from this kind of analysis apply to both new and existing products. The underwriting cycle is inherently a pricing phenomenon, and insurers and reinsurers that have greater and more timely product and pricing insights have a competitive advantage relative to those that do not. To explain, in addition to lower rates, the “soft” parts of the underwriting cycle tend to be characterized by the loosening of policy terms and conditions, which can erode profitability as quickly as inadequate prices. Therefore, the most competitive insurers and reinsurers carefully and continuously track the adequacy of policy terms and conditions. Recurring actuarial analyses and standardized reporting can monitor changes in pricing as well as in terms and conditions. However, identifying emerging underwriting risks is inherently qualitative. Therefore, this analysis can be time-consuming, especially for insurers with suboptimal PAS environments. However, almost all companies find the analysis well worth the effort.

Corporate Development

The combination of historically low interest rates, favorable frequency and severity trends and the relative lack of severe catastrophes has resulted in record policyholder surplus across P&C commercial insurance. Executives have a number of options on how to deploy surplus, one of which is corporate development.

Commonly, “corporate development” means mergers and acquisitions, but it can also encompass book purchases/rolls, renewal rights and runoff purchases. Determining the best option depends on many factors, including purchase price, competitive implications and an assessment of how the acquired assets and any related capabilities can complement or enhance existing underwriting capabilities.

Accordingly, some insurers are beginning to augment traditional due diligence processes (such as financial diligence, tax diligence and IT diligence) with underwriting-specific diligence to help ensure value realization over time.

If a corporate development opportunity offers underwriting capabilities that at least align to—and preferably enhance—existing capabilities, it can help facilitate a smooth integration, thereby mitigating underwriting risk (a key cycle management consideration).

Talent Management

For the most part, commercial underwriting decisions cannot be fully automated because they require judgment. Therefore, it is natural for underwriting talent to be a top priority. However, insurance executives have lamented that it is a major challenge for the industry to attract and retain knowledgeable personnel.

Two trends make commercial insurance talent management particularly challenging. First, experienced underwriters are leaving the industry. According to one study, “The number of employees aged 55 and over is 30% higher than any other industry—and that, coupled with retirements, means the industry needs to fill 400,000 positions by 2020.” Second, underwriting talent is relatively difficult to attract. For example, according to the Wall Street Journal, insurance ranks near the top of the list of least-desirable industries—according to recent graduates. The image of the insurance industry is that it is generally behind the times and offers little in terms of career development. Therefore, developing a performance-driven culture that enables the recruitment, development and retention of underwriting talent is more crucial than ever.

To help accomplish this, insurers should employ and should continuously assess tools and resources that educate and empower underwriters through all phases of their careers. This is important because the expectations in commercial underwriting are high, and the nature of the job requires a diverse range of skills (e.g., analytical, relational, sales, financial and risk). Furthermore, the best commercial underwriters are entrepreneurial, which employers should highlight as they recruit and manage their underwriting staffs.

Commercial insurers face a looming talent crunch and have to find ways to present themselves as—and actually be—a place where young people can have rewarding careers.

Implications

  • The relatively strong underwriting results of recent years are likely to soften in the coming year. Accordingly, commercial underwriters will need to accelerate their strategic efforts in:
  1. Core systems and data quality,
  2. New products, pricing discipline and terms and conditions,
  3. Corporate development
  4. Talent management
  • Core systems transformations go beyond individual system competencies. To ensure timely, quality data across the entire commercial P&C value chain, insurers also are focusing on how the various systems are integrated with each another to facilitate the timely and efficient extraction and analysis of internal data and the focused and efficient use of external data (especially unstructured data).
  • There are opportunities to create new products, but, to be profitable, insurers must exercise pricing discipline and must carefully and continuously track the adequacy of policy terms and conditions.
  • Current surplus levels have enabled insurers to invest in corporate development, and some insurers have augmented traditional due diligence processes (such as financial diligence, tax diligence and IT diligence) with underwriting-specific diligence to help promote value realization over time.
  • Commercial insurers have an aging workforce and are facing an impending talent crunch. Automation cannot replace the judgment that is required for effective underwriting. Therefore, it is vital for insurers to develop a performance-driven culture that enables the recruitment, development and retention of underwriting talent over time.

Are You Fit Enough for Growth?

When it comes to scrutinizing costs, most insurance companies can say, “Been there, done that. Got the T-shirt.” Managers are familiar with the refrain from above to trim here and cut there. The typical result is flirtation with the latest management trends like lean, outsourcing and offshoring. However, the results tend to be the same. Budgets reflect last year’s spending plus or minus a couple of percent.

Meanwhile, managers attempt to develop strategies to capitalize on the trends reshaping the industry – customer-centricity, analytics, digital platforms and disruptive delivery and distribution models. Yet, after all of the energy companies exert to reduce expenses, there is often little left over to spend on these strategic initiatives.

Why do you need to look at your expense structure?

A variety of pressures have led carriers to improve their cost structures. In all parts of the market, low interest rates and investment returns are forcing carriers to scrutinize costs to improve return on capital, or even to maintain profitability to stay in business.

After all of the energy that companies exert to reduce expenses, there is often little energy left over to spend on strategic initiatives.

P&C carriers with lower-cost distribution models have been able to channel investments into advertising and take share, forcing competitors to reduce costs to defend their positions. Consolidation in the health, group and reinsurance sectors have forced smaller insurers to either a) explore more scalable cost structures or b) put themselves up for sale. For life and retirement companies, lower interest rates have taken a toll on the competitiveness of investment-based products.

This spells trouble for companies that have not adequately sorted out their expense structure. And a shrinking insurance company sooner or later will run afoul of regulators, ratings agencies, distributors and customers. Even if expenses are shrinking, if revenue is declining more quickly then the downward spiral will accelerate. It is virtually impossible to maintain profitability without growth. Expenses increase with inflation, tick upward with each additional regulatory requirement and can spike dramatically when attempting to meet customer and distributor demands for improved experiences and value-added services.

The reality is that companies have to grow, and that’s difficult in a mature market, especially in times when “the market” isn’t helping. What’s the key to success, then? In short, growth comes from better capabilities, service, customer-focus and products – all of which require continuing investment in capabilities.

See Also: 2016 Outlook for Property-Casualty

The math doesn’t work unless you’re finding ways to spend less in unimportant areas and allocate those savings to more important ones. If your answer to any of the following questions is “no,” then it’s important that you look at your allocation of resources for capital, assets and spending:

  • Are you making your desired return on capital?
  • Are your growth levels acceptable?
  • Do you have an expense structure that lets you compete at scale?

The transformation of insurers from clerk-intensive, army-sized bureaucracies to highly automated financial and service operations has been a decades-long process. The industry has invested heavily enough in standardization and automation that one would expect it to be a well-oiled machine. However, when we look under the covers, we see an industry with a considerable amount of customization and one-offs. In other words, the industry behaves more like cottage industry than an industrial, scalable enterprise.

We know that expenses are difficult to measure, let alone control. But why are they so intractable?

The industry’s poorly kept secret is that insurers, even larger ones, have sold many permutations of products with many different features. All of these have risk, service, compensation, accounting and reporting expenses, as well as coverage tails so long the company can’t help but operate below scale.

Why are expenses so intractable? The issue is scale.

What defines operating at scale for you? A straightforward way to answer this question is to consider whether you’re operating at a level of efficiency on par with or better than the best in the marketplace. Where do you draw the line? The top 10% to 15%? The top 20% to 25%? Next, ask yourself if you, in fact, are operating at scale. Remove large policies and reinsurance that disguise operating results, then sort out how many differentiated service models you are supporting. Are you in the bottom half of performers? Are you in the top 50% but not the top quartile? Are you in the top quartile but not the top decile?

Every insurer needs a more versatile and flexible expense structure to fully operate at scale and be more competitive.

Competition is changing

Customers now have access to a wealth of information and are increasingly using it to make more informed choices. New market entrants are establishing a foothold in direct and lightly assisted distribution models that make wealth management services more affordable for more market segments. Name brands are establishing customer mind-share with extensive advertising. FinTech is shifting the way we think about adding capabilities and creating capabilities in near real time. Outsourcers are increasingly proficient and are investing in new technologies and capabilities that only the largest companies can afford to do at scale.

See Also: Don’t Do It Yourself on Property Claims

The competitive landscape will continue to change. More products will be commoditized – after all, consumers prefer an easy-to-understand product at a readily comparable price. As they do now, stronger companies will go after competitors with less name recognition and scale and lower ratings. Customer research and behavioral analytics will more accurately discern life-long customer behavior and buying patterns for most lifestyles and socio-demographic groups. The role of advisers will change, but customers of all ages will still like at least occasional advice, especially when their needs – and the products they purchase to meet them – are complex.

Table stakes are greater each year and now include internal and external digital platforms, data-derived service (and self-service) models, omni-channel distribution models and extensive use of advanced analytics. The need to improve time-to-market has never been more important. Scale matters. Because they can increase scale, partners also matter even more than in the past. If they have truly complementary capabilities, new partners can help you improve your cost curve because you can leverage their scale to improve yours (and vice-versa).

In conclusion, all companies – regardless of scale – need to ensure that their capital and operating spending aligns with their strategy and capabilities and the ways they choose to differentiate themselves in the market. In this transformative time, the ones that can’t or won’t do this will fall increasingly behind the market leaders.

Implications: Leave no stone unturned

  • Managing expenses is a job that is never finished. Even if you’ve already looked at expenses, it doesn’t mean that you get a pass from scrutinizing them afresh. You will always have to keep rolling that particular boulder up the hill. Acknowledging that you could always manage expenses better is the first step to doing it well.
  • Identify and commit to the cost curves that get you to scale. This may require new thinking about sourcing partners and which evolving capabilities hold the most promise for the future of the company. How transformative do your digital platforms need to be? Can the cloud help you operate more efficiently and economically? How constraining is your culture, management and governance?
  • Every company needs to invest. Every company needs to be “fit for growth.” You will need to increase expenses where it helps you compete and decrease it where it doesn’t. Admittedly, this is hard to do, but the companies that don’t do it successfully will be left by the wayside.

Best Practices for Predictive Models

There’s little doubt about the proven value in using predictive analytics for risk selection and pricing in P/C insurance. In fact, 56% of insurers at this year’s Valen Analytics Summit that are not currently using predictive analytics in underwriting plan to start within a year. However, many insurers haven’t spent enough energy planning exactly how they can implement analytics to get the results they want. It’s a common misconception that competitive advantage is won by simply picking the right model.

In reality, the model itself is just a small part of a much larger process that touches nearly every part of the insurance organization. Embracing predictive analytics is like recruiting a star quarterback; alone, he’s not enough to guarantee a win. He both requires a solid team and a good playbook to achieve his full potential.

The economic crash of 2008 emphasized the importance of predictive modeling as a means to replace dwindling investment income with underwriting gains. However, insurance companies today are looking at a more diverse and segmented market than pre-2008, which makes the “old way of doing things” no longer applicable. The insurance industry is increasing in complexity, and with so many insurers successfully implementing predictive analytics, greater precision in underwriting is becoming the “new normal.” In fact, a recent A.M. Best study shows that P/C insurers are facing more aggressive pricing competition than any other insurance sector.

Additionally, new competitors like Google, which have deep reservoirs of data and an established rapport and trust with the Millennial generation, means that traditional insurers must react to technologies faster than ever. Implementing predictive analytics is the logical place to start.

The most important first step in predictive modeling is making sure all relevant stakeholders understand the business goals and organizational commitment. The number one cause of failure in predictive modeling initiatives isn’t a technical or data problem, but instead a lack of clarity on the business objective combined with a defect in the implementation plan (or lack thereof).

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ASSESSMENT OF ORGANIZATIONAL READINESS

If internal conversations are focused solely on the technical details of building and implementing a predictive model, it’s important to take a step back and make sure there’s support and awareness across the organization.

Senior-Level Commitment – Decide on the metrics that management will use to measure the impact of the model. What problems are you trying to solve, and how will you define success? Common choices include loss ratio improvement, pricing competitiveness and top-line premium growth. Consider the risk appetite for this initiative and the assumptions and sensitivities in your model that could affect projected results.

Organizational Buy-In – What kind of predictive model will work for your culture? Will this be a tool to aid in the underwriting process or part of a system to automate straight-through processing? Consider the level of transparency appropriate for the predictive model. It’s usually best to avoid making the model a “black box” if underwriters need to be able to interact with model scores on their way to making the final decisions on a policy.

Data Assets – Does your organization plan to build a predictive model internally, with a consultant or a vendor that builds predictive models on industry-wide data? How will you evaluate the amount of data you need to build a predictive model, and what external data sources do you plan to use in addition to your internal data? Are there resources available on the data side to provide support to the modeling team?

MODEL IMPLEMENTATION,/p>

After getting buy-in from around the organization, the next step is to lay out how you intend to achieve your business goals. If it can be measured, it can be managed. This step is necessary to gauge the success or failure post-implementation. Once you’ve set the goals for assessment, business and IT executives should convene and detail a plan for implementation, including responsibilities and a rollout timeline.

Unless you’re lucky enough to work with an entire group of like-minded individuals, this step must be taken with all players involved, including underwriting, actuarial, training and executive roles. Once you’ve identified the business case and produced the model and implementation plan, make sure all expected results are matched up with the planned deliverables. Once everything is up and running, it is imperative to monitor the adoption in real-time to ensure that the results are matching the initial model goals put in place.,/p>

UNDERWRITING TRAINING

A very important but often overlooked step is making sure that underwriters understand why the model is being implemented, what the desired outcomes are and what their role is in implementing it. If the information is presented correctly, underwriters understand that predictive modeling is a tool that can improve their pricing and risk selection as opposed to undermining the underwriters. But there are still some who rely solely on their own experience and knowledge who may feel threatened by a data-driven underwriting process. In fact, nearly half of the attending carriers at the 2015 Valen Summit cited lack of underwriting adoption as one of the primary risks in a predictive analytics initiative.

Insurers that have found the most success with predictive modeling are those that create a specific set of underwriting rules and showcase how predictive analytics are another tool to enhance their performance, rather than something that will replace them entirely. Not stressing this point can result in resistance from underwriters, and it is essential to have their buy-in. At the same time, it is also important to monitor the implementation of underwriting guidelines, ensuring that they are being followed appropriately.

KEEPING THE END IN MIND,/p>

Many of the challenges and complexities in the P/C marketplace are out of an individual insurer’s control. One of the few things insurers can control is their use of predictive modeling to know what they insure. It’s one of the best ways an insurer is able to protect its business from new competitors and maintain consistent profit margins.

Using data and analytics to evaluate your options allows you to test and learn, select the best approach and deliver results that make the greatest strategic impact.

While beginning a predictive analytics journey can be difficult and confusing at first glance, following these best practices will increase your chances of getting it right on the first try and ensuring your business goals will be met.

7 Imperatives for Moving Into the Cloud

For property and casualty insurance carriers, growth is hard-fought in an environment of compressed margins, regulatory scrutiny, increased competition and customer expectations for anywhere/anytime service. Add unsteady economic conditions, low interest rates that decrease investment income and catastrophic losses from significant events such as Hurricane Sandy into the mix, and insurers are finding that their tried-and-true business methodologies that worked well pre-2008 are in desperate need of a facelift. Growth is especially challenging for insurance carriers with inflexible legacy technology systems, as well as small and mid-size carriers that lack the resources to make the product and operational changes they need to remain relevant and profitable.

Insurance carriers must navigate an environment that rewards nimbleness and flexibility, but to do so requires that insurers modernize their current systems and processes. Consider the example of bringing a new product to market. At most insurers, the process may take six months or more, with a price tag reaching seven figures. By the time the product is ready to launch, the dynamics in the market have shifted, or perhaps a new regulation has been legislated. The insurer has two equally unappealing choices: Launch the product as is and never realize a return on investment, or delay launch and retool the product, increasing the R&D price tag and losing potential revenue and market share.

There is a better way: Updating legacy systems with flexible and scalable Software as a Service (SaaS) computing capabilities allows P&C insurers to rapidly capitalize on opportunities and support growth. This article presents seven imperatives for the P&C insurance industry based on industry research and analysis, and outlines how a SaaS implementation can address each imperative.

IMPERATIVE 1: INCREASE SPEED-TO-MARKET 

In an Accenture survey of insurance industry professionals, more than seven of 10 (72%) respondents indicated that it takes their organization six months or more to launch a major product. In today’s constantly changing environment, six months is a long time indeed, and it’s likely that the market looks different than when product development began. However, insurers that are able to rapidly offer innovative products and services through multiple channels can take advantage of shifts in the market and exploit the slowness of competitors. Today, “slow and steady” doesn’t win the race.

Compared with legacy system-based product development, which requires coding, scripting and testing, a SaaS infrastructure by design incorporates more nimble and configurable software, significantly reducing development time and eliminating the cost of hiring a vendor or consultant to make coding changes. In addition, SaaS provides rapid provisioning of live and test environments to further increase speed-to-market. Lastly, SaaS requires minimal investment in hardware, software and personnel. Insurers can use a pre-configured infrastructure to reduce development costs by more than 80% over comparable legacy systems, according to Donald Harrell, senior vice president of marine, exploration and production for Liberty International Underwriters. This, in turn, reduces the risk for product launches.

IMPERATIVE 2: QUICKLY RESPOND TO MARKET AND COMPETITIVE CHANGES

Those insurers not able to turn on a dime may be in trouble because so many of their competitors are preparing to invest in technologies and processes that will help them design, underwrite and distribute products and services more quickly. More than 80% of insurance CEOs are planning to increase investment in technology, and more than 60% plan to develop their capacity for innovation. Innovation must continue after product launch, and SaaS allows insurers to retool products as market drivers dictate.

The ability to revamp an existing product is particularly attractive to small or mid-size insurers launching products to a relatively small target market. With SaaS, insurers are able to bring niche products to market that would otherwise not deliver enough ROI to justify the investment. Likewise, if a product is not profitable, an insurer can make changes and quickly reconfigure the product rather than being forced to offer an unprofitable or marginally profitable product because it’s too costly to make changes.

Insurers can also more effectively price products. SaaS is charged on a subscription or consumption basis, so costs are more closely aligned with the revenue being generated by the new product.

IMPERATIVE 3: REDUCE COSTS TO MAINTAIN PROFITABILITY

As the U.S. economy slowly improves, P&C profitability is starting to improve as well. However, there is little cause for celebration. Fitch Ratings warns insurers that the current pricing cycle may be running out of steam, forcing insurers to cut expense levels to maintain profitability. Now is the time for insurers to put in place cost-saving strategies. With a SaaS infrastructure, insurers can innovate and offer new products and services without incurring capital expenses.

Rather than implement an expensive technology infrastructure, SaaS allows insurers to leverage preconfigured infrastructure and reduce IT resource requirements, staffing and professional services fees. In fact, SaaS up-front costs are typically less than 20% of the development costs of legacy systems. SaaS pricing models have also matured, giving insurers access to a variety of bundled and unbundled pricing options.

IMPERATIVE 4: AUTOMATE AND STREAMLINE UNDERWRITING

A survey of insurance professionals by FirstBest Systems found that 82% of respondents believe that their insurer’s underwriters spend less than half of their time actually underwriting, with the majority of underwriter time spent on data collection and administrative tasks. Insurers understand that giving underwriters the automation tools they need to do their jobs effectively is key to improved underwriting, but many believe that the technology is problematic, with 81% citing lack of data integration as limiting underwriting productivity. In contrast to legacy underwriting systems, SaaS allows insurers to easily incorporate rules to automate the underwriting process and increase underwriting ratios and revenues.

SaaS also allows for streamlined data integration as opposed to off-the-shelf packages that often need extensive modification, thus eliminating a major stumbling block to optimal productivity for underwriters.

IMPERATIVE 5: SUPPORT NEW DELIVERY CHANNELS

Mobile technology continues to be top-of-mind for many carriers, with more than 60% planning to add new mobile capabilities for policyholders and agents. Notes Novarica partner Matthew Josefowicz, “As the use of smartphones and especially tablets displaces the use of desktops and laptops in more areas of personal and professional life, support for these platforms is becoming critical to insurers’ abilities to communicate electronically across the value chain.” The problem for carriers is that legacy systems were not designed to run on mobile devices. However, SaaS, with its more modern coding, is able to provide both a better user interface and operational efficiency for smartphones and tablets. SaaS allows insurers to distribute products through a variety of new channels (e.g., banks, car dealerships) that would not be possible with legacy systems.

Creating and recreating websites and portals quickly and inexpensively means that insurers can more readily compete with “disrupters” that use a direct-to-consumer model. Insurers can design multiple portals for different geographies, languages and associations in near-real time. Deloitte reiterates the importance of mobile and other delivery channels for insurers: “No one can afford to take their distribution systems for granted. More insurers are likely to grow bolder in exploring alternative channels to capture greater market share, catering to the needs and preferences of different segments while cutting frictional costs.”

IMPERATIVE 6: COLLABORATE WITH THIRD PARTIES

Insurers are increasingly relying on third parties for a variety of integration services, including regulatory compliance, sophisticated data analysis, geo-location capabilities for risk assessments and risk ratings for more accurate underwriting and risk pricing. Integration between carrier legacy systems and third-party providers is typically problematic because of proprietary file formats and other issues that make it difficult to share data. In contrast, SaaS provides links to existing interfaces for access to third-party databases. Integration reduces costly, error-prone and time-consuming manual intervention.

IMPERATIVE 7: IMPROVE THE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE

The majority of insurers (91%) believe that future growth depends on providing a special customer experience, according to Accenture’s survey. However, getting the relevant and up-to-date data they need to give customers a personalized experience is a critical challenge for 95% of respondents.

In the same survey, only 50% of insurers say that their carrier leverages data about customer lifestyles to determine the products and services most likely to meet customer expectations; 70% rate themselves as “average” or “weak” in their ability to tailor products and services to customers’ needs. A similar number (64%) give themselves low ratings for their ability to provide innovative products and services. Poor service — or even average service — is no longer acceptable. Consumers are accustomed to personalized experiences such as shopping on Amazon or booking airline tickets on a travel site, and expect a similar type of experience from their insurer.

Thomas Meyer, managing director of Accenture’s insurance practice, says, “To pursue profitable growth, insurers need to achieve the kind of differentiation that allows organizations like Apple to charge a premium while building customer loyalty. As Apple has shown, the answer is consumer-driven innovation that creates an exceptional user experience.” SasS enables insurers to access the data points they require to differentiate their products throughout the customer experience. In a market commoditized by regulations and related factors, insurers that can leverage SaaS to deliver a straightforward, simple process to customers will give themselves a competitive advantage.

 CONCLUSION

In an accelerated market where change is the new constant, P&C insurance carriers cannot afford to continue to do business as usual. Imperatives such as speed-to market, responsiveness to customer demands, new delivery channels, cost reduction and improved underwriting make it necessary for insurers to explore new methods of providing products and services to customers. SaaS, with its flexibility, scalability and low cost, is a technology imperative if carriers hope to grow and remain competitive.

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