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The Healthcare Industry Is Ripe For Baseline Testing

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Workers in the healthcare industry face many risks, and one that consistently arises as a major cost driver is musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), better known as soft tissue injuries. Because of the difficulty in objectively identifying and subsequently treating these conditions, employers must now consider new options when it comes to risk control.

Patient handling tasks are recognized as the primary cause of musculoskeletal disorders among the nursing workforce. A variety of patient handling tasks exist within the context of nursing care, such as lifting and transferring patients. Nursing personnel have been on the top-10 list of workers with the highest risk for musculoskeletal disorders since 1999, and although the numbers of injured health care workers has decreased, nurses, nurse’s aides, orderlies, and attendants have remained at the top of this list since then.

According to OSHA, in 2010 there were 27,020 cases, which equates to an incidence rate (IR) of 249 per 10,000 workers, more than seven times the average for all industries. In 2010 the average incidence rate for musculoskeletal disorder cases with days away from work increased 4 percent, while the musculoskeletal disorder incidence rate for nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants increased 10 percent. For musculoskeletal disorder cases involving patient handling, virtually all were the result of overexertion, sprain, strain, or tear.

Additionally, according to an American Nurses Association 2012 study, 52 percent of nurses complain of chronic back pain with a lifetime prevalence up to 80% and 38% report having occupational-related back pain severe enough to require leave from work. The same study revealed that 12% of nurses leaving the profession report back pain as a main contributory factor and 20% have reported changing to a different unit, position, or employment because of back pain. In fact, nursing personnel have the highest incidence rate of workers compensation claims for back injuries of any occupation.

Nursing aides, orderlies and attendants incurred occupational injuries or illnesses in 48% of the musculoskeletal disorder cases involving health care patients. Other occupations with musculoskeletal disorder cases involving health care patients included licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses, emergency medical technicians and paramedics, personal and home care aides, health care support workers, radiologic technologists and technicians, and medical and health services managers.

A significant challenge in the healthcare industry is nursing home workers. Providing care to residents is physically demanding work. While the cost of musculoskeletal disorders to the health care industry is staggering, it has an even greater impact in nursing homes. Caregivers often suffer physical pain from their injuries and subsequently lose time from work. Nursing home facilities lose stability from caregivers’ absences, and residents suffer the loss of caregivers who understand their individual needs.

According to the CDC, the financial burden of back injuries in the healthcare industry is estimated to add up to $20 billion annually. These costs include higher employer costs due to medical expenses, disability compensation, and litigation. Nurse injuries also are costly in terms of chronic pain and functional disability, absenteeism, and turnover. Furthermore, this is an aging workforce (average age is 46.8 years), and there is an expected 20% shortage of personnel by 2015 and 30% by 2020. The indirect consequence is that back claims will likely increase as the workforce ages and new, inexperienced workers are hired to fill the shortage.

This is such a problem that as of April 2012 the following states — California, Illinois, Hawaii, Maryland, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Rhode Island, Texas, and Washington — have enacted safe patient handling legislation. However, prevention may not always work for this industry. The teaching of manual lifting techniques has not been successful in affecting injury rates for nurses. This is largely due to the fact that patient characteristics and workplace environment may make it difficult to employ correct techniques. In addition, even if proper techniques are used, patient weight may exceed National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health lifting guidelines.

Why Baseline Testing Is The Solution For Employers
Employers are only responsible for work-related injuries that arise out of the course and scope of employment. The employer needs only to return the injured worker to pre-injury status, but it is virtually impossible for employers to objectively document an employee’s pre-injury status. The only way the Healthcare industry can manage their musculoskeletal disorder cases is by adopting the the EFA-STM baseline test, which is an objective, evidence-based tool designed to measure the functional status of an injured worker and to identify return-to-work opportunities.

The EFA-STM Program is specifically customized for an employer’s current workforce as well as new hires and complies with all ADAAA and EEOC regulations.

It begins by providing baseline soft-tissue injury testing for existing employees, as well as new hires. The data is maintained off-site and only interpreted when and if there is a soft tissue claim. After a claim, the injured worker is required to undergo the post-loss testing, thereby granting control of claim when this is often not the case. The subsequent comparison objectively demonstrates whether or not an acute injury exists. If so, the claim is accepted for the exact injury, or aggravation delta between the post-loss and baseline tests, thereby limiting liability to only what the employer owes and eliminating the issue of paying for existing or degenerative issues. If no acute pathology is found, then the claim is never accepted. The utilization of this book end strategy allows for unprecedented access to information and allows for better treatment.