Tag Archives: operations

What Will Operations Look Like in 2028?

In a 2011 article in Insurance and Technology, Kathy Burger enumerated several big technological changes in the insurance industry since 2001, including the rise of big data, the ubiquitous nature of cell phones and social media and an increased emphasis on data security and privacy.

Seven years later, these once-big innovations are par for the course. P&C insurers and insurtech companies are now positioned to use these tools — which scarcely existed in 2001 and which were only beginning to be broadly embraced in 2011 — as the foundation for the next wave of major changes in the insurance industry.

Now, let’s look at some of the biggest rising insurtech trends today to get an idea of where they’re likely to take us 10 years from now.

Auto Insurance

In July 2015, Jayleen R. Heft published an article at PropertyCasualty360 with the provocative title, “Will the auto insurance industry be obsolete in 20 years?”

Heft cited the work of Deutsche Bank research analyst Joshua Shanker, who argued that by 2030 self-driving cars and ride-sharing services would occupy so much of the automotive market that setting rates based on driving data would no longer be necessary. Instead, the companies behind these vehicles and services would simply “insure their cars like any other product,” Heft said.

While self-driving cars and ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft are already shaking up the auto industry, predicting the demise of auto insurance by 2030 — or by 2028, even — may be premature. Pay-per-mile auto insurance is gaining popularity. Spearheaded by companies like Metromile and Esurance, the pay-per-mile model charges a base rate, plus a specified rate for each mile driven.

“Each mile usually costs a few cents,” Craig Casazza explains in an article for ValuePenguin. “So if you drive 200 miles per month at a rate of five cents per mile, you would be charged $10.” In addition, Metromile only charges drivers for the first 250 miles driven in any given day in most states.

Tracking Mileage With Telemetrics

Both Metromile and Esurance use telemetrics to track miles driven to calculate each month’s rate. Metromile calls its program the “Metromile Pulse,” and it uses the car’s OBD-II port to track mileage.

Other insurance companies have experimented with telemetrics for a number of years but haven’t connected rates directly to miles driven. Instead, they use the vehicle’s data to adjust rates in a more complex, less transparent manner, Casazza says.

See also: Future of P&C Tech Comes Into Focus  

The pay-per-mile model is increasingly popular with younger drivers, who often have the option to abandon their cars entirely for the convenience of Uber or public transportation, but who are happy to keep the freedom of their own vehicle when they feel they can more directly control its costs. For these drivers, who include a growing number of those currently under age 40, auto insurance may survive into the 2030s — although it may operate in a very different way.

Shanker’s prediction that auto insurance will fade into product liability insurance over the next decade, however, may be prescient. In an October 2017 article in Business Insider, Danielle Muoio explored Tesla’s partnership with Liberty Mutual to sell insurance as part of the purchase price of the company’s vehicles. The plan, called InsureMyTesla, factors in the car’s autopilot feature while setting rates and comes up with a lower cost than other insurance plans as a result, Muoio reports.

Insuring Shared Rides

Similarly, while ride-sharing company Uber currently requires drivers to carry their own auto insurance coverage while also providing supplementary insurance, the company may switch to providing all insurance coverage on its cars as it continues to move into the self-driving vehicle market.

Given Uber’s bumpy ride in producing self-driving vehicles, however, the company’s total abandonment of conventional auto insurance expectations for human drivers may be more than 10 years out, Tech Radar’s Leif Johnson and Michelle Fitzsimmons said in May 2018.

Adding Value and Processing Claims

“Digital technology destroys value,” warned a March 2017 article by Tanguy Catlin, Johannes-Tobias Lorenz, Christopher Morrison, and Holger Wilms at McKinsey & Co. According to the authors, “although digital technology propels some companies to become clear market winners, for many more its impact depletes corporate earnings and the overall value of an industry. Consumers, not companies, are often the ultimate winners.”

To stay relevant, the authors said, insurance companies must “meet customers’ expectations, which have been transformed by digital technology.”

In 2018, insurance companies seeking to stay ahead of the curve often accomplish this task by breaking down their own silos and presenting a quick, clean digital interface that makes it easy for customers to interact with the company and for staff to understand customers’ needs and provide clear, consistent answers.

Bridging Human and Automated Workflows

By 2028, companies are likely to have struck a balance between automation and human intervention — a balance that many insurers are currently struggling to find, Rick Huckstep writes in an article in The Digital Insurer. Automation offers both the opportunity to improve claims response and the challenge of providing the “human touch” that customers also demand, as Roger Peverelli and Reggy De Feniks put it in a December 2017 piece for Insurance Thought Leadership.

The goal will be to use automation in a way that doesn’t feel automated. As AI technology continues to develop, this goal may be fully realized within 10 years.

The automation of many of the current day-to-day tasks faced by insurance agents will, in turn, change agents’ jobs. Some commentators are already predicting that today’s field agents will be obsolete by 2023, replaced by “bionic agents” who have fully integrated digital tools, including AI and machine learning, into their work.

How Automation Influences Customer Expectations

Customers are already demanding the knowledge and flexibility a bionic agent exemplifies. As Jason Walker writes at PropertyCasualty360, “Consumers today want the ability to conduct insurance business anytime, anywhere for simple transactions, while at the same time be able to have a relationship with a professional to discuss complex policy questions or walk them through the claims process.” As this option becomes ever more normalized for customers, the demand for the same experience in insurance will rise. as well.

The result? By 2028, “digital natives” won’t only be insurance customers — they’ll also be insurance agents who leverage technology not only to serve customers but to demonstrate real value in the insurance process.

See also: Key Strategic Initiatives in P&C  

Automation and Claims Processing

Field agents aren’t the only insurance industry professionals who will see their work change dramatically by 2028. The ways insurance companies process claims will change, as well, driven in large part by customer expectations.

For instance, Ben Rossi writes at Information Age that about a fifth of young adult customers (ages 18–24) expect insurance companies to use drone technology to survey property damage and gather information for claims.

This idea “would have been unthinkable as recently as a couple of years ago,” Rossi says. Ten years from now, sending a drone to a damaged building or factory site may be as commonplace as sending a human adjuster has been for the past 10 years.

For many of us, 2008 feels like it was yesterday. In 2028, our memories of 2018 will feel the same — yet the insurance industry is poised to be eons ahead of where it currently stands, and insurtech will lead the way.

When Insurers and Insurtech Collide

The insurance industry is on a collision course. As in the 1933 science fiction novel “When Worlds Collide,” a small number of individuals with insight have recognized this fact and are preparing for a new and different future, while many others are blissfully unaware of the impending danger.

Okay, maybe that is a bit dramatic, but the traditional world of insurance is threatened by the rapidly encroaching digital world and insurtech.

At SMA, we foresee a convergence of the traditional and the new that will create an updated generation of the industry rather than the disruption (and perhaps destruction) of the industry that some predict.

Very few of the new entrants want to go it completely alone when it comes to meeting regulatory and capital requirements, underwriting the risk and managing the end-to-end insurance value chain. Instead, they tend to create value in specific areas that might mesh nicely into areas in need of enhancement at existing insurers. Thus, the emergence of convergence — or the bringing together of the new, innovative companies and capabilities with the traditional elements of established businesses.

See also: A Mental Framework for InsurTech

What is this convergence likely to look like? And, more importantly, what should insurers do to position themselves for success? If there is a single word that describes how convergence is playing out in the industry, that word is “partnering.” One way to look at the partnering opportunities is to combine the best of the old with the best of the new in five key areas.

  • Distribution: About 30% of all insurtech startups are, in some way, connected with the distribution space. These companies are born digital; often create an innovative customer experience; and leverage mobile, artificial intelligence, gamification and other technologies. Distribution is a prime area for partnering, and all of these new distribution firms are looking for insurer partners.
  • Risk: The rapidly expanding availability of data on perils (especially real-time data) offers new possibilities for improved risk selection and pricing. New predictive models and scores; more location-based data with greater levels of precision; and new real-time behavioral data all create differentiating opportunities for insurers. Much of this new capability is available through firms that could be great partners.
  • Product: Innovation is the name of the game with products. There are many insurtech firms that are creating ideas for micro-insurance, usage-based insurance, behavior-based insurance and parametric insurance. Many innovators are seeking insurers with underwriting capacity and a solid distribution network.
  • Customer service: New options are emerging for areas such as billing, claims and other areas related to customer service. New and emerging technologies are especially relevant here, with drones, blockchain, mobile payments, AI, wearables and other tech creating new options. Many of the insurtech firms have innovative offerings in very specific areas and look for proof-of-concept and piloting opportunities with insurers.
  • Operations: Many tech companies — both incumbent and new firms — offer solutions to take operational efficiency to the next level. Robotic process automation and other AI techs lead the way, but other technologies offer improvements, as well. Video streaming and smart glasses for claims can improve claim operations. Again, the companies that are creating these new solutions are eager to partner with insurers.

See also: Why AI Will Transform Insurance

The future doesn’t have to be a disaster scenario for the insurance industry. In fact, the potential is here for the industry to reach new levels of profitability and societal impact. Partnering to leverage emerging technologies, new business models, innovative products and new ways to reach customers can result in the best of both worlds for everyone, delivering new value to customers and growth for the industry.

A Simple Model to Assess Insurtechs

“The paradox of teaching entrepreneurship is that such a formula necessarily cannot exist; because every innovation is new and unique, no authority can prescribe in concrete terms how to be innovative.”

― Peter Thiel, Zero to One

Whether we’re talking about telematics, artificial intelligence (AI), digital distribution or peer-to-peer, investing in insurance-related technology (commonly termed “insuretech” or “insurtech”) is no longer considered boring. In fact, insurtech is one of the hottest investable segments in the market. As a 20-plus-year veteran in insurance, I find it surreal that insurance has become this hip. Twenty years ago, I gulped as I sent an email to the CFO of my company, where I proposed that there was a unique opportunity in renters insurance. That particular email was ignored. Today, that idea is worth millions of dollars.

What changed?

Insurance seems to be the latest in a string of industries caught in the crosshairs on venture capital. With the success of Uber and AirBnB, VCs are now looking for the next stale industry to disrupt, and the insurance industry carries the reputation of being about as stale as they come. The VCs view the needless paperwork, cumbersome purchasing processes, dramatic claims settlement and overall old-school look and feel of the industry and think they can siphon those trillions of dollars of premium over to Silicon Valley. It seems like a reasonable thesis.

The problem is, it’s not going to happen that way. Insurance will NOT be disrupted. While insurance looks old and antiquated on the exterior, it is actually quite modern and vibrant on the interior. The insurance industry is actually the Uncle Drew of businesses; it’s just getting warmed up!

The Model

Much of the reason I think VCs are unaware of their doomed quest for insurance disruption is that they are looking at the market from a premium standpoint and envisioning being able to capture large chunks of it. $5 trillion is a lot of money. Without an appropriate model, an outsider coming into insurance can naively think they can capture even a fraction of this. But premium is strongly tied to losses. Those premium dollars are accounted for in future claims.

I once had a VC ask me what the fastest way to $100 million in revenue was. The answer is easy, “slash the premium.” I had to quickly follow up with, “and be prepared to be go insolvent, as there is no digging yourself out of that hole.” He didn’t quite get it, until I walked him through what happens to a dollar of premium as it enters the system. And it was this that became the basis of the model I use to assess new product formation and insurtech startups.

There are four basic components to my model. Regardless of new entrants, new products or new sources of capital, these four components remain everpresent in any insurance business model. Even if a disruptive force was able to penetrate the industry veil, that force would still need to reflect its value proposition within my four components.

Component 1 – EXPOSURE

This is the component that deals with insurance claims: past, present and future. Companies or products looking to capture value here must be able to reduce, prevent, quantify or economically transfer current or new risks or losses. Subcomponents in this category include expenses arising from fraud and the adjustment of claims, both of which can add substantially to overall losses.

See also: Insurance Coverage Porn  

Startups such as Nest are building products that increase home security by decreasing the likelihood of burglary (or increasing the likelihood of capturing the criminals on video) and thus reduce claims associated with burglary or theft. Part of assessing the value proposition of Nest is to first understand the magnitude of the claims associated with burglary and theft and then quantify what relief this product could provide (along with how that relief should be shared among stakeholders).

Another company that is doing some interesting things in this model component is Livegenic (disclaimer: I have become friends with the team). Livegenic allows insurers to adjust claims and capture video and imagery using the mobile phone of the insured. This reduces the expenses associated with having to send an adjuster out to each and every claim. Loss adjustment expenses can be in excess of 10% of all claims, so technology that reduces that by a few basis points can be quite valuable to an insurer’s bottom line and ultimately its prices and competitiveness.

Component 2 – DISTRIBUTION

This component focuses on the expenses associated with getting insurance product into the hands of a customer. Insurtech companies in this space are typically focused on driving down commissions. This can be done by eliminating brokers and going directly to customers. Savings can also be achieved by creating efficient marketplace portals that allow customers to easily buy coverage.

Embroker is one of many companies trying to do just that in the small commercial space by creating a fully digital business insurance experience. Companies such as Denim Labs are providing social and mobile marketing services to companies in insurance. And then there is Lemonade, which is developing AI technology that it hopes will reduce the friction of digitally purchasing (its) insurance and making the buying process “delightful.”  Peer-to-peer (P2P) insurance is a fairly new insurtech distribution model that attempts to use the strength of close ties via social methods for friends and close associates to come together to make their own insurance pools.

Distribution expenses in insurance are some of the highest in any industry. As with the risk component, reducing expenses in this component by even a few basis points is incredibly valuable.

Component 3 – CAPITAL

This component focuses on the expenses associated with providing capital or the reinsurance backstop to a risk or portfolio. For many insurers, reinsurance is the largest expense component in the P&L. Capital is such an important component to the business model that the ramifications of it almost always leak into the other components. This was one of my criticisms of  Lemonade recently. Lemonade will have a lot of difficulty executing some of the aspects of its business model simply because it cedes 100% of its business to reinsurers. So, when it comes to pricing or its general underwriting guidelines, its reinsurance expenses will overwhelm other initiatives. Lemonade can’t be the low-cost provider AND a peer-to-peer distributor because its reinsurance expenses will force it to choose one or the other. This is a nuance that many VCs will miss in their evaluation of insurtechs!

For those seeking disruption in insurance, we have historical precedent of what that might look like based on the last 20 years of alternative capital flooding into the insurance space. I will devote space to this in future articles, but, in brief, this alternative capital has made reinsurance so inexpensive that smaller reinsurers are facing an existential crisis.

Companies such as Nephila Capital and Fermat Capital are the Ubers of insurance. Their ability to connect investors closer to the insurance customer along with their ability to package and securitize tranches of risk have shrunk capital expenses tremendously. Profit margins for reinsurers are collapsing, and new business models are shrinking the insurance stack. It is even possible today to bypass BOTH veritable insurers and reinsurers and put the capital markets in closer contact with customers. (If you are a fan of Michael Lewis and insurance, you will enjoy this article, which ties nicely into this section of the article).

In the insurtech space, VCs are actually behind the game. Alternative capital has already disrupted the space, and many of the investments that VCs are making are in the other components I have highlighted. Because of the size of this component, VCs may have already missed most of the huge returns.

Component 4 – OPERATIONS

The final component is often the one overlooked. Operations includes all of the other expenses not associated with the actual risk, backing the risk or transferring the risk from customer to capital. This component includes regulatory compliance, overhead, IT operations, real estate, product development and staff, just to name a few.

It is often overlooked because it is the least connected to actually insuring a risk, but it is vitally important to the health and viability of an insurer. Mistakes here can have major ramifications. Errors in compliance can lead to regulatory problems; errors in IT infrastructure can lead to legacy issues that become very expensive to resolve. I don’t know a single mainstream insurer that does not have a legacy infrastructure that is impinging on its ability to execute its business plan. Companies such as Majesco are building cloud-based insurance platforms seeking to solve that problem.

See also: Why AI Will Transform Insurance  

It is this component of the business model that allows an insurer to be nimble, to get products to market faster, to outpace its competitors. It’s not a component that necessarily drives financial statements in the short term, but in the long run it can be the friction that grinds everything down to a halt or not.

SUMMARY

I have presented a simple model that I use when I assess not just new insurtech companies but also new insurance products coming into the market. By breaking the insurance chain into these immutable components, I can estimate what impact the solution proposed will provide. In general, the bigger the impact and the more components a solution touches the more valuable it will be.

In future articles, I will use this model to assess the insurtech landscape. I will also use this model to assess how VCs are investing their capital and whether they are scrutinizing the opportunities as well as they should, or just falling prey to the fear of missing out.

Originally published at www.insnerds.com,