Tag Archives: online payment

The Mystery of the Millennial Buyer

For several years, I’ve heard clamor from the agency world about how Millennials’ demands are so different from previous insurance buyers. Well, as a Millennial insurance buyer, I’m here to say… we still have some work to do. We still have a lot of work to do.

According to Accenture Outlook: Who are the Millennial shoppers? And what do they really want?, Millennials are exceptionally loyal …if they feel they’ve been treated right. And, we all know it’s cheaper to keep a customer than it is to get a new one.

“Right” is an incredibly subjective term and can certainly get lost in translation in the insurance world. “Right,” in the insurance world, typically means paying exactly what is fair for losses. No more, no less. That’s understandable, and, as someone in the insurance world, I understand the sentiment.

But I’d like to help you to understand how I define “right” as a Millennial insurance buyer.

Educate, don’t sell

The days of the uninformed insurance buyer are long gone. The added value of the agent is around education. Take a step back and help the Millennial customer understand the fundamentals of risk management and see that insurance is one of many tools used to manage risk. Millennials will identify the value that you bring to the purchasing transaction and remain loyal customers rather than commodity-buyers.

Empower them to make good financial choices

You empower Millennials to make smart financial decisions through education. This also means explaining the upsides and downsides of different policy options. For example, explaining how deductibles and premiums correlate, rather than trying to get them to take the lowest deductible. Millennials expect that, when they come to you asking for help in the realm of personal finance, you’ll be looking out for their best financial interests, rather than your commission check. As soon as a Millennial believes you’re NOT looking out for her best interest and are more interested in the sale, you have just made yourself the commodity.

No more fancy terminology

We have an epidemic of insurance buyers who have no clue what they’re buying. “Limit,” “peril,” “liability,” “occurrence” – these are not words the Average Joe and Average Jane have any practical reason to know, outside of purchasing insurance. Millennials won’t settle for someone who isn’t able (or willing) to give the layman’s definition of these terms. This requires you to have a real command of the fundamentals of risk and insurance, rather than a command of policy forms and exclusions.

Embrace technology to increase service

Sure you have a Facebook and a Twitter, maybe you even post regularly, but that’s not what will retain Millennials. Make yourself and your agency available to them on their terms: phone, email, text or social media. Encourage them to take pictures and videos of all their belongings if they don’t want to make an inventory list. Send periodic, non-marketing text messages to encourage safety. (Example: “With the coming cold weather, be sure you clean off your furnace and think about getting it inspected. Build-up can reduce efficiency, which costs you more money and might even cause a fire.”) These are the types of things that will differentiate you and your team from every other agent out there.

As an aside: If you want to serve Millennials, you must make online payments easy. Most Millennials don’t own stamps and are using the same checkbook they got when they were 16 and opened their first checking account.

Humanize them at claim time

Millennials want to be treated like the humans they are when claims hit, which, in all reality, isn’t asking much. Instead of aiming for that minimum threshold, exceed expectations by doing the following when you are notified of their claim: 1) Make sure they’re okay, 2) Check in and see how they’re doing and if they’re worried about anything (lawsuits, another loss, further injury, claim not getting paid, etc.), 3) Make sure you’re communicating with them, in addition to the adjuster, 4) Explain to them how this might affect future premiums. Claims are your time to shine, and, if treated well, Millennials can be some of the most loyal customers you’ll have.

In closing …

Insurance is a paper and a promise

Without anything more tangible than that, it’s not too much to ask to be treated well, as a smart and autonomous human being. If you can show that to your Millennial customers and follow it up at claims time, you’ll crack the nut that is the Millennial insurance-buyer.

The views expressed by the author are the author’s alone and do not necessarily represent the views of Aon or its affiliates. The standard information provided in this blog is for general purposes only and should not be construed as, or used as a substitute for, financial or other professional advice.

Pros and Cons of ApplePay Security

ApplePay, the mobile payments service introduced by Apple in October 2014, could ultimately set the security and privacy benchmarks for digital wallets much higher.

Even so, the hunt for security holes and privacy gaps in Apple’s new digital wallet has commenced. It won’t take long for both white hat researchers and well-funded criminal hackers to uncover weaknesses that neither Apple nor its banking industry partners thought of.

Here’s ThirdCertainty’s breakdown of the security and privacy issues stirred by Apple’s bold move into the digital wallet business.

ApplePay defined

Available on the iPhone 6 and Apple Watch, ApplePay stores account numbers on a dedicated chip. Apple refers to this chip as the “secure element” only available n the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 plus. It is on this chip that your financial information is stored. It is only accessed when a random 16-digit number gets generated for a given transaction, and the number never makes it to the phone’s software, where hackers could reach it.

The devices then use near field communication (NFC) to send a simple token, instead of the full account number, to the merchant’s NFC-enabled point-of-sale register.

“This allows an ultra secure payment,” says Anthony Antolino, business development officer at Eyelock, a biometrics technology vendor. “The only remaining concern is keeping the smart phone under your control.”

Apple tightens down who can control each device by integrating itsTouch ID fingerprint scanner and its Passbook ticket-buying app into ApplePay. This new approach keeps personal information on the device – instead of moving account data into storage servers within easy reach of thieves. The hacks of big merchants in the U.S. and Europe, including Home Depot, Target, P.F. Chang’s and Neiman Marcus, show how adept data thieves have become at attacking stored data.

How ApplePay improves security

ApplePay validates a “data-centric security model,” argues Mark Bower, product management vice president at Voltage Security.

“The payments world needs to move on from vulnerable static credit card numbers and magnetic stripes to protected versions of data,” Bower says. “Tokenized payments reduce the risk of data breaches and credit card theft.”

Mathew Rowley, technical director at security consultancy NCC Group, observes that the U.S. payment card industry continues to require minimal security checks in authorizing credit and debit card purchases.

“Things like chip-and-PIN and two-factor credit cards have been implemented in other countries, but the U.S. seems to be behind the curve,” Rowley says. “Any additional logic built into the process of making payments will make it more secure.”

How ApplePay introduces new risks

Adding a mobile wallet function to the latest iPhone gives criminal hackers more incentive and opportunity to find fresh vulnerabilities, says Mike Park, managing consultant at Trustwave.

“Any new additions and functionality to a platform, even ones meant to enhance security, can expand the attack surface,” Park says. “With the introduction of this type of functionality into a platform, this makes every device a possible target.”

The more popular ApplePay becomes, the more likely cybercriminals will devote resources to cracking in. Research from legit sources already is available showing how to hack into NFC systems — for instance this 2012 report from Accuvant reseacher Charlie Miller.

It’s probable that elite criminal hackers “are looking to steal identities and mass harvest payment card information as they do in other platforms and verticals now,” Park says.

One simple crime would be to target Apple devices for physical theft. Another is to figure out how to remotely access and manipulate ApplePay accounts. “The weakest link is the consumer,” says Alisdair Faulkner, chief products officer at ThreatMetrix. “And ultimately a web page with a username and login, like iCloud, now has an unprecedented amount of information about you backed up into the cloud.”

Pushing payments to mobile devices makes Internet cloud services more complex – and complexity creates vulnerabilities.

“In the past, the only participants were the merchant, the merchant’s bank and your personal bank,” says Richard Moulds, vice president of product strategy at Thales e-Security. “Apple is stating that they will not know the details of individual transactions, which is very important; however, there is clearly the risk of attacks on the phone itself.”