Tag Archives: netflix

What Amazon, Netflix Can Teach Insurers

What insurers face now, digital giants like Amazon and Netflix faced when they moved to operate exclusively in the digital marketplace: transactions increasingly shifting to digital, and operations affected by an unprecedented wave of automation. Let’s explore the lessons these companies learned as they confronted the challenges that insurers face as they adapt to the digital marketplace.

One critical change for Amazon and Netflix was making a fundamental shift in the way their core systems and architecture were developed: they evolved – out of necessity – to migrate to a more flexible and responsive architecture by incorporating microservices. The factors that led to this shift sound strikingly similar to those affecting the insurance world. Here are five key factors for insurance companies to consider when planning their future technology directions, with examples of how Amazon and Netflix addressed similar issues.

  • Availability is a fundamental need when designing a digital user experience. Streamlining customer journeys depends on having technology and data at the point of the transaction. Netflix’s big availability issue was with its video library – which is a key selling point of the service. From a customer perspective, being able to watch thousands of movies and other content is less attractive if the customer can’t access the catalog any time. Netflix brought microservices to bear on this challenge, isolating the library functionality and running it independently from the rest of the user experience. This provided the capability to continually and frequently upgrade the catalog. For insurers, intermittent outages – especially on nights and weekends, when consumers and small business owners shop for insurance and digital agents are still working – are equally unacceptable.
  • Scalability and availability go hand in hand. When the volume of transactions goes up, processing power must be able to scale up, too. Monolithic tech stacks struggle here, especially because the points of failure can be so small – as insurers well know! Amazon’s shopping cart functionality had plenty of capacity for regular traffic but was challenged when required to scale up for the incredible volume of purchases on Black Friday and Cyber Monday. Inventory control is critical because you have to understand what products are in shoppers’ carts, what inventory can still be offered and when to cut off the sale of a specific item. Amazon decoupled the cart functionality from its monolithic tech stack and deployed a microservice that ran alongside the rest of their tech environment. The shopping cart microservice had the much simpler task of checking the inventory and maintaining customers’ carts. It could access additional processing power as the volume went up without relying on the same servers running the rest of the Amazon architectural stack. And because the shopping cart service was decoupled from the main system software, it could be continually updated and enhanced.
  • Speed is critical for scalability, and microservices have a lot to offer here. Both Netflix’s library and Amazon’s shopping cart experience are changing rapidly, with requests coming from thousands of users at a time from different front ends. Digital giants are known for providing a responsive user experience that is highly scalable without the need for serial data processing. Using microservices to support multi-threaded requests have given both companies an edge. For insurers, the support of an increasingly complex maze of distribution outlets requires rating capabilities that can consistently deliver sub-second responses. The ability to decouple this from core processes while dynamically scaling based on the needs of the front end is critical, regardless of line of business.
  • Maintainability and upgradability are significant areas of consideration for all insurers, based on the current state of their technology environments. As we look to the policy, billing and claims systems or the front-end user experiences, etc., insurers need the ability to increase the speed of software upgrades to be a more continuous, less disruptive and therefore higher-value undertaking. As we look at the dynamically changing user experiences needed in today’s digital world, the ability to upgrade these components and reuse discrete services at a greater frequency than back-end functionality is becoming a critical capability.

This is where microservices really shine. Each isolated process supports a small, discrete function. Therefore, it is easier to focus on a very specific capability with an update. There is flexibility gained in adapting to new integration points and integrating new services. The magnitude of the testing effort decreases significantly.

See also: What if Amazon Entered Insurance?

These are game changers for insurers that have been struggling with a monolithic architecture where everything affects everything else. And microservices give insurers the ability to ease pain points in their current technology environments and add capabilities without going through a full rip and replace.

We have much to learn from other industries’ successes and failures within the digital marketplace. But, let’s not reinvent the wheel. Let’s look at the lessons learned by the leaders in other markets and apply the knowledge they have gained.

In Age of Disruption, What Is Insurance?

“Somehow we have created a monster, and it’s time to turn it on its head for our customers and think about providing some certainty of protection.” – Inga Beale, CEO, Lloyds of London

In an early-morning plenary session at this year’s InsureTech Connect in Las Vegas, Rick Chavez, partner and head of digital strategy acceleration at Oliver Wyman, described the disruption landscape in insurance succinctly: while the first phase of disruption was about digitization, the next phase will be about people. In his words, “digitization has shifted the balance of power to people,” forcing the insurance industry to radically reorient itself away from solving its own problems toward solving the problems of its customer. It’s about time.

For the 6,000-plus attendees at InsureTech Connect 2018, disruption in insurance has long been described in terms of technology. Chavez rightly urged the audience to expand its definition of disruption and instead conceive of disruption not just as a shift in technology but as a “collision of megatrends”–technological, behavioral and societal–that is reordering the world in which we live, work and operate as businesses. In this new world order, businesses and whole industries are being refashioned in ways that look entirely unfamiliar, insurance included.

This kind of disruption requires that insurance undergo far more than modernization, but a true metamorphosis, not simply shedding its skin of bureaucracy, paper applications and legacy systems but being reborn as an entirely new animal, focused on customers and digitally enabled by continuing technological transformation.

In the new age of disruption …

1. Insurance is data

“Soon each one of us will be generating millions of data sets every day – insurance can be the biggest beneficiary of that” – Vishal Gondal, GOQUii

While Amazon disrupted the way we shop, and Netflix disrupted the way we watch movies, at the end of the day (as Andy G. Simpson pointed out in his Insurance Journal recap of the conference) movies are still movies, and the dish soap, vinyl records and dog food we buy maintain their inherent properties, whether we buy them on Amazon or elsewhere. Insurance, not simply as an industry but as a product, on the other hand is being fundamentally altered by big data.

At its core, “insurance is about using statistics to price risk, which is why data, properly collected and used, can transform the core of the product,” said Daniel Schreiber, CEO of Lemonade, during his plenary session on day 2 of the conference. As copious amounts of data about each and every one of us become ever more available, insurance at the product level– at the dish soap/dog food level–is changing.

While the auto insurance industry has been ahead of the curve in its use of IoT-generated data to underwrite auto policies, some of the most exciting change happening today is in life insurance, as life products are being reconceived by a boon of health data generated by FitBits, genetic testing data, epigenetics, health gamification and other fitness apps. In a panel discussion titled “On the Bleeding Edge: At the Intersection of Life & Health,” JJ Carroll of Swiss RE discussed the imperative of figuring out how to integrate new data sources into underwriting and how doing so will lead to a paradigm shift in how life insurance is bought and sold. “Right now, we underwrite at a single point in time and treat everyone equally going forward,” she explained. With new data sources influencing underwriting, life insurance has the potential to become a dynamic product that uses health and behavior data to adjust premiums over time, personalize products and service offerings and expand coverage to traditionally riskier populations.

Vishal Gandal of GOQuii, a “personalized wellness engine” that is partnering with Max Bupa Insurance and Swiss Re to offer health coaching and health-management tools to customers, believes that integrating data like that generated by GOQuii will “open up new risk pools and provide products to people who couldn’t be covered before.” While some express concern that access to more data, especially epigenetic and genetic data, may exclude people from coverage, Carroll remains confident that it is not insurers who will benefit the most from data sharing, but customers themselves.

See also: Is Insurance Really Ripe for Disruption?  

2. Insurance is in the background

“In the future, insurance will buy itself automatically” – Jay Bergman

Some of the most standout sessions of this year’s InsureTech Connect were not from insurance companies at all, but from businesses either partnering with insurance companies or using insurance-related data to educate their customers about or sell insurance to their customers as a means of delivering more value.

Before unveiling a new car insurance portal that allows customers to monitor their car-related records and access a quote with little to no data entry, Credit Karma CEO Ken Lin began his talk with a conversation around how Credit Karma is “more than just free credit scores,” elucidating all of the additional services they have layered on top of their core product to deliver more value to their customers. Beyond simply announcing a product launch, Lin’s talk was gospel to insurance carriers, demonstrating how a company with a fairly basic core offering (free credit scores) can build a service layer on top to deepen engagement with customers. It’s a concept that touches on what was surely one of the most profound themes of the conference–that, like free credit scores, insurance only need be a small piece of a company’s larger offering. This may mean embedding insurance into the purchase of other products or services (i.e., how travel insurance is often sold) or it may mean doing what Credit Karma has done and layering on a service offering to deepen engagement with customers and make products stickier.

Assaf Wand, CEO of the home insurance company Hippo, spoke to both of these models in his discussion with David Weschler of Comcast about how their two companies are partnering to make insurance smarter and smart homes safer. When asked about what the future of insurance looks like, Wand put it plainly when he said: “Home insurance won’t be sold as insurance. It will be an embedded feature of the smart home.” Jillian Slyfield, who heads the digital economy practice at Aon, a company that is already partnering with companies like Uber and Clutch to insure the next generation of drivers, agrees: “We are embedding insurance into these products today.”

Until this vision is fully realized, companies like Hippo are doing their part to make their insurance products fade into the background as the companies offer additional services for homeowners, “Can I bring you value that you really care about?” Wand asked, “Wintering your home, raking leaves, these are the kinds of things that matter to homeowners.”

3. Insurance is first and foremost a customer experience

“The insurance industry has to redefine our processes… go in reverse, starting with the customer and re-streamlining our processes around them” – Koichi Nagasaki, Sompo

To many outside the insurance industry, the idea of good customer experience may seem unremarkable, but for an industry that has for so long been enamored by the ever-increasing complexity of its own products, redefining processes around customers is like learning a foreign language as a middle-aged adult. It’s hard, and it takes a long time, and a lot of people aren’t up to the task.

The insurance industry has been talking about the need for customer-centricity for a while now, but many companies continue to drag their feet. But customer-centricity is and remains more than a differentiator. It’s now table stakes. How this plays out for the industry will look different for different companies. Some will turn to partnerships with insurtechs and other startups to embed their products into what are already customer-centric experiences and companies. Chavez of Oliver Wyman would rather see the industry “disrupt itself,” as he believes it’s critical that companies maintain the customer relationship. In his plenary sessions, he cited the German energy company Enercity as a company that disrupted itself. Operating in a similarly regulated industry, rather than becoming just a supplier of energy, the company invested heavily in its own digital strategy to become a thought leader in the energy space, to be a trusted adviser to its customer and to deliver an exceptional digital experience that, among other things, leverages blockchain technology to accept bitcoin payments from customers. For Chavez, insurtech is already a bubble, and, “If you want to succeed and thrive in a bubble, make yourself indispensable.” The only way to do this, he believes, is to maintain ownership over the customer experience, because, in today’s digital economy, the customer experience is the product.

But to own the customer experience and succeed will require insurance companies to completely reorient their business practices and processes – to start with the customer and the experience and work backward toward capabilities. In the words of Han Wang of Paladin Cyber, who spoke on a panel about moving from selling products to selling services, “It’s always a questions of what does the customer want? How do they define the problem? And what is the solution?”

4. Insurance is trust

“The world runs on trust. When we live in a society where we have lots of trust, everyone benefits. When this trust goes away, everyone loses.” – Dan Ariely, Lemonade

During a faceoff between incumbents and insurtechs during one conference session, Dylan Bourguignon, CEO of so-sure cinched the debate with a single comment, calling out large insurance carriers: “You want to engage with customers, yet you don’t have their trust. And it’s not like you haven’t had time to earn it.” This, Bourguignon believes, is ultimately why insurtechs will beat the incumbents.

Indeed, the insurtech Lemonade spent a fair amount of stage time preaching the gospel of trust. Dan Ariely, behavioral economist and chief behavior officer at Lemonade, delivered a plenary session entirely devoted to the topic of trust. He spoke about trust from a behavioral standpoint, explaining how trust creates equilibrium in society and how, when trust is violated, the equilibrium is thrown off. Case in point: insurance.

Insurance, he explained, has violated consumer trust and has thrown off the equilibrium–the industry doesn’t trust consumers, and consumers don’t trust the industry, a vulnerability that has left the insurance industry open to the kind of disruption a company like Lemonade poses. As an industry, insurance has incentives not to do the thing it has promised to do, which is to pay out your claims. And while trust is scarcely more important in any industry as it is in insurance, save in an industry like healthcare, the insurance industry is notoriously plagued by two-way distrust.

What makes Lemonade stand out is that it has devised a system that removes the conflict of interest germane to most insurance companies – as a company, it has no incentives to not pay out customer claims. In theory, profits are entirely derived by taking a percentage of the premium; anything left over that does not go to pay out a claim is then donated to charity. The result: If customers are cheating, they aren’t cheating a company, they are cheating a charity. Ariely described several instances where customer even tried to return their claims payments after finding misplaced items they thought had been stolen. “How often does this happen in your companies?” he asked the audience. Silence.

And it’s not just new business models that will remedy the trust issues plaguing insurance. It’s new technology, too. In a panel titled “Blockchain: Building Trust in Insurance,” executives from IBM, Salesforce, Marsh and AAIS discussed how blockchain technology has the capacity to deepen trust across the industry, among customers, carriers, solutions providers and underwriters by providing what Jeff To of Salesforce calls an “immutable source of truth that is trusted among all parties.” Being able to easily access and trust data will have a trickle down effect that will affect everyone, including customers, employees and the larger business as a whole–reducing inefficiencies, increasing application and quote-to-bind speed, eliminating all the hours and money that go into data reconciliation and ultimately making it easier for carriers to deliver a quality customer experience to their customers.

See also: Disruption of Rate-Modeling Process  

While the progress in blockchain has been incremental, the conference panel demoed some promising use cases in which blockchain is already delivering results for customers, one example being acquiring proof of insurance for small businesses or contractors through Marsh’s platform. With blockchain, a process that used to span several days has been reduced to less than a minute. Experiences like these–simple, seamless and instantaneous – are laying the groundwork for carriers to begin the long road to earning back customer trust. Blockchain will likely play an integral role this process.

5. Insurance is a social good

“We need insurance. It is one of the most important products for financial security.” – Dan Ariely, Lemonade

For all of the the naysaying regarding state of the industry that took place at InsureTech Connect, there were plenty of opportunities for the industry to remind itself that it’s not all bad, and its core insurance is something that is incredibly important to the stability of people across the globe. Lemonade’s Schreiber called it a social good, while Ariely told his audience, “We need insurance. It is one of the most important products for financial security.” Similar sentiments were expressed across stages throughout the conference.

In fact, in today’s society, income disparity is at one of the highest points in recent history, stagnating wages are plaguing and diminishing the middle class, more people in the U.S. are living in poverty now than at any point since the Great Depression, the social safety net is shrinking by the minute and more than 40% of Americans don’t have enough money in savings to cover a $400 emergency, so insurance is more important than ever.

For Inga Beale, CEO of Lloyds of London, insurance has a critical role to play in society, “It goes beyond insurance–it’s about giving people money and financial independence,” she said during a fireside chat. She went on to describe findings from recent research conducted by Lloyds, which determined that, by the end of their lives, men in the U.K. are six times better off financially than women. When designed as a tool to provide financial independence and equality for everyone, insurance can play an important role in addressing this disparity. While this has been a focus in emerging markets, financial stability and independence is often assumed in more developed markets, like the U.S. and Europe. In reality, it is a problem facing all markets, and increasingly so. Ace Callwood, CEO of Painless1099, a bank account for freelancers that helps them save money for taxes, agrees that insurance has an important role to play. “It’s our job to get people to a place where they can afford to buy the products we are trying to sell,” he said.

You can find the article originally published here.

Too Much Tech Is Ruining Lives

Just four years ago, I was a cheerleader. Social media was supposed to be the great hope for democracy. I know because I told the world so. I said in 2014 that no one could predict where this revolution would take us. My conclusion was dusted with optimism: A better-connected human race would find a way to better itself.

I was only half right: Nobody could have predicted where we have ended up. Yet my optimistic prognosis was utterly misguided. Social media has led to less human interaction, not more. It has suppressed human development, not stimulated it. As Big Tech has marched onward, we have regressed.

Look at the evidence. Research shows that social media may well be making many of us unhappy, jealous and — paradoxically — antisocial. Even Facebook gets it. An academic study that Facebook cited in a blog post revealed that when people spend a lot of time passively consuming information, they wind up feeling worse. Just 10 minutes on Facebook is enough to depress — clicking and liking a multitude of posts and links seems to have a negative effect on mental health.

See also: The World Doesn’t Need Silicon Valley  

Meantime, the green-eyed monster thrives on the social network: Reading rosy stories and carefully controlled images about the social  and love lives of others leads to poor comparisons with one’s own existence. Getting out in the warts-and-all real world and having proper conversations would provide a powerful antidote. Some chance! Humans have convinced themselves that catching up online is a viable alternative to in-person socializing.

And what of consumer choice? Former Google design ethicist Tristan Harris noted in an essay on how technology hijacks people’s minds, that it is actually designed to give us fewer choices, not more. When you do a Google search for a restaurant, for example, you are presented with a limited set of choices, with advertisers appearing at the top of a list. We rarely browse to the second page of search results. Harris likened this to what magicians do: “Give people the illusion of free choice while architecting the menu so that they win, no matter what you choose.”

We are becoming unthinkingly reliant — addicted — to ease of use at the expense of quality. We are walking dumpsters for internet content that we don’t need and that might actively damage our brains.

The technology industry also uses another technique to keep us hooked: feeding us a bottomless pit of information.

This phenomenon’ is the effect Netflix has when it auto-plays the next episode of a show after a cliffhanger and you continue watching, thinking, “I can make up the sleep over the weekend.” The cliffhanger is, of course, always replaced by another cliffhanger. The 13-part season is followed by another one, and yet another. We spend longer in front of the television, yet we feel no more satiated. When Facebook, Instagram and Twitter tack on their scrolling pages and update their news feeds, causing each article to roll into the next, the effect manifests itself again.

Perhaps we should go back to our smartphones and, instead of playing Netflix or sending texts on WhatsApp, use their core function. Call up our friends and family and have a chat or — better — arrange to meet them.

Meanwhile, Big Tech could carve an opportunity from a crisis. What about offering a subscription to an ad-free Facebook? In return for a monthly fee, searches would be based on quality of content rather than product placement. I would pay for that. The time savings alone when booking a trip would be worth it.

See also: No, AI Isn’t Taking Over Firms’ Decisions  

Apple pioneered the Do Not Disturb function, which stopped messages and calls waking us from sleep, unless a set of emergency criteria were met by the caller. How about a Focus Mode that turned off all notifications and hid our apps from our home screen, to ease the temptation to play with our phones when we should be concentrating on our work, or talking to our spouses, friends and colleagues?

In the 1980s, the BBC in Britain ran a successful children’s series called “Why Don’t You?” that implored viewers to “turn off their TV set and go out and do something less boring instead,” suggesting sociable activities that did not involve a screen. It was wise before its time. The TV seems like a puny adversary compared with the deadening digital army we face today.

The Industry’s New Dynamic Duo

Insurers are full of economy-speak these days. We have the gig economy, the digital economy, the data economy and the sharing economy. There is the economy of one, the economy of the many, the service economy and, of course, the experience economy. These concepts are all real and vital considerations for insurers, yet most deal with the implications of external impact, asking, “How will the world affect our business?”

In one striking case, however, we are faced with an alternative question: How will our operations affect our world? We are in the midst of the digital age race where survival and winning will require rapid adaptability and innovation. The digital age represents a seismic shift in the insurance industry, pushing a sometimes slow-to-adapt industry by challenging the traditional business models and assumptions of the past 30-50 years. The business models of the past will not meet the needs or expectations of the future for digital insurance. So insurers will be drawing upon the strengths of a new type of economy that will provide internal energy to the organization and competitive drive to the industry.

This economy is the platform economy.

Cloud platforms are the future because they are the core of revolutionized business models. They are proven. They are intelligent. They combine sought-after technologies. Best of all, they fit an industry that has been trying to become consumer-centric.

Of course, there is an issue. The cloud-based, digital-ready platforms within the platform economy are easiest to plant in uncultivated environments. Most established insurers are in the thick of modernization of a different type and scale. When faced with the options, many will choose digital answers that are painted over modernized frameworks. At the same time, they will be flirting with the idea that a real platform shift may represent a hyper-jump into insurance’s agile future.

The Rise of the Platform Economy

In our new thought leadership, Cloud Business Platform: The Path to Digital Insurance 2.0, we note that the use of big data, artificial intelligence and cloud computing is changing the nature of work and the structure of the economy. Companies such as Apple, Amazon, Netflix, Facebook, Google, Salesforce and Uber are creating online structures that enable a wide range of activities. They have opened the doors to radical changes in how we work, socialize, create value in the economy and compete for profits. This is why a digital platform economy is emerging.

See also: Busting Myths on the Cloud (Part 2)  

Cloud business platforms represent a new era of impact and industry upheaval. A cloud business platform is one that can run key business applications and services to match the reality and requirements of the current business environment. That environment is characterized by constant disruption, heavy competition and growing market demands. Insurtech entrants are embarking upon business and technology initiatives that exploit untapped markets and address under- or un-met needs. Incumbents with outdated technologies are at a huge disadvantage because they are unable to respond with the flexibility, agility and speed that has become the hallmark of companies that are digital natives.

With investments in this market subset being tracked at just under $16 billion since 2010, insurers need to immediately take notice. Successful companies across all industries leverage technologies such as mobile, social and cloud to make better decisions, automate processes, strengthen their connection with customers/partners/channels and pursue innovation. They do all of this at an increasingly rapid pace, positioning them as “digital first” companies. The acceleration in the uptake of digital technologies and cloud foundations is a crucial first step to entering into the platform world and the shift to a new era of insurance we call Digital Insurance 2.0.

The implication from all this is that the digital age economy is powered by the platform revolution.

Digital Insurance 2.0

Traditional insurers must have digital daydreams now and then. What if we could have started like Amazon instead of like a traditional insurer? What if we had a digital native architecture like Netflix? Why couldn’t we have turned an app into a multi-billion-dollar business as Uber did? Google was disruptive because its framework and model were created to meet the future head on. How do we do what they have done while we are shackled to the constraints of insurance? The advantages these companies enjoy compared to the challenges faced by insurers can make digitalization of insurance seem like an impossible task. The reality is, however, that insurers now have every opportunity for freedom within traditional insurer constraints utilizing a Digital Insurance 2.0 framework.

What are the attributes of Digital Insurance 2.0? In every aspect, digital platforms are driving toward business models with fewer barriers and greater data access with improved flow. Digital insurance  platforms share these traits:

  • Maximized effectiveness across the entire customer journey with deeper, personalized engagement;
  • Process digitization that improves operational efficiencies and customer experience;
  • The ingestion and use of digital data-driven insights for better decision-making and to actively identify customer needs;
  • The ability to rapidly roll out new products and capabilities while expanding into new markets or geographies; and
  • Quick adaptation to rapid changes.

The crucial technology underpinning digital insurance platforms is cloud-based. The idea that a 10-year old technology like cloud computing could provide new opportunities for insurers seems far-fetched.

Cloud platforms, however, have become the option of choice for Greenfield or startup operations that are offering digitally-enabled traditional insurance products — like Lemonade, Slice and TROV. Cloud platforms are the basis of a new generation of core systems based on a micro-services architecture that is needed for innovative new insurance products like on-demand and micro-insurance offerings.

Shifting from Products to Platforms

Since the beginning of automation, the insurance industry has seen fundamental design, architecture and technology shifts in insurance core software solutions. First, we had the monolithic solutions running on the mainframe from the 1960s to early 2000s. This was followed with the best of breed components in early 2000s for policy, billing and claims based on J2EE and service-oriented architecture — but with each still using different business, data and technology architectures. Next, beginning in the early 2010s, came the loosely coupled “suites,” inclusive of the policy, billing and claims components but with a consistent and common business, data and technology architecture.

Yet, through these transitions, they maintained a product-focused business architecture view, emphasizing policy and billing and claims capabilities and with implementation primarily on-premise or in a private hosted environment, often a “pseudo cloud environment.”

Today’s digital shift will require cloud-based platforms that provide a great promise to address new challenges and opportunities that enable insurers to disrupt their markets before they are disrupted. This requires a new thinking of our solutions… one that makes the transition from products to platforms and is underpinned by three key attributes: ecosystem-friendly, centered on customer experience and enabled by cloud computing.

Unfortunately, too many insurers are taking a page from their old business transformation playbooks and are expecting it to work in today’s digital age. They are forging a new path by “paving the old cow paths,” which is simply creating greater complexity while moving in a direction that will not serve them well in the future. Instead, insurers need to look outside their companies to a new cadre of digital leaders and imagine the art of the possible. What can insurers do now that they could not do before because of technology, customer and market boundary changes?  Today’s emerging new competitors are answering these questions ahead of traditional insurers, positioning themselves as the new generation of market leaders in a time of significant disruption and change.

See also: ‘Core in the Cloud’ Reaches Tipping Point  

Fundamentally, to succeed in the digital age, an insurer’s strategy must focus on the following attributes:

  • Customer experience and engagement is priority No. 1 (People)
  • Business innovation is mandatory (Technology)
  • Ecosystems extend value (Market Boundaries)
  • Speed-to-value is the differentiator

For an effective digital transformation, it is important that core, data and digital capabilities are broken out into micro-services. They are then integrated back into the platform to provide a digital experience. Innovative, “digital-first” companies like Google, Amazon, Salesforce, Workday, Uber, Airbnb and Netflix have successfully used this architecture and technology that is disrupting industries. In the case of insurance, digital experiences are enabled by cloud economies of scale — an advantage that many digital-first companies do not have.

Why is this important? Because it will allow insurance companies to more rapidly position themselves in the digital era of Insurance 2.0 and enable them to:

  • Accelerate digital transformation to become digital era market leaders;
  • Accelerate innovation with new business models and products;
  • Accelerate ecosystem opportunities and value; and
  • Avert disruption or extinction by new competition within and outside the industry.

At the heart of this disruption is a shift from Insurance 1.0 to Digital Insurance 2.0 and a growing gap where innovative insurtech or existing insurers are taking advantage of a new generation of buyers with new needs and expectations and are capturing the opportunity to be the next market leaders in the digital age.

The path to a cloud business platform will evolve differently for each insurer undertaking it. Being open to operationalize around the cloud platform’s promise as a new business model paradigm acknowledges the role innovation will continue to play as insurers encounter future insurance ecosystems. The time for plans, preparation and execution is now — recognizing that the gap is widening and the timeframe to respond is closing.

Will established insurers suffer at the hands of tech-savvy, culture-savvy competition, or will they turn their digital daydreams into dynamic realities?

In a rapidly changing insurance market, new competitors do not play by the traditional rules. Insurers need to be a part of rewriting the rules, because there is less risk when you write the new rules.

New Era of Commercial Insurance

Despite a generally soft market for traditional P&C products, the fact that so many industries and the businesses within them are being reshaped by technology is creating opportunities (and more challenges). Consider insurers with personal and commercial auto. Pundits are predicting a rapid decline in personal auto premiums and questioning the viability of both personal and commercial auto due to the emergence of autonomous technologies and driverless vehicles, as well as the increasing use of alternative options (ride-sharing, public transportation, etc.).

Finding alternative growth strategies is “top of mind” for CEOs.  Opportunities can be captured from the change within commercial and specialty insurance. New risks, new markets, new customers and the demand for new products and services may fill the gaps for those who are prepared.

Our new research, A New Age of Insurance: Growth Opportunities for Commercial and Specialty Insurance at a Time of Market Disruption, highlights how changing trends in demographics, customer behaviors, technology, data and market boundaries are creating a dramatic shift from traditional commercial and specialty products to the new, post-digital age products redefining the market of the future.

See also: Insurtechs Are Pushing for Transparency

Growth Opportunities

New technologies, demographics, behaviors and more will fuel the growth of new businesses and industries over the next 10 years. Commercial and specialty insurance provides a critical role to these businesses and the economy — protecting them from failure by assuming the risks inherent in their transformation.

Industry statistics for the “traditional” commercial marketplace don’t yet reflect the potential growth from these new markets. The Insurance Information Institute expects overall personal and commercial exposures to increase between 4% and 4.5% in 2017 but cautioned that continued soft rates in commercial lines could cause overall P&C premium growth to lag behind economic growth.

But a diverse group of customers will increasingly create narrow segments that will demand niche, personalized products and services. Many do not fit neatly within pre-defined categories of risk and products for insur­ance, creating opportunities for new products and services.

Small and medium businesses are at the forefront of this change and at the center of business creation, business transformation and growth in the economy.

  • By 2020, more than 60% of small businesses in the U.S. will be owned by millennials and Gen Xers — two groups that prefer to do as much as possible digitally. Furthermore, their views, behaviors and expectations are different than those of previous generations and will be influenced by their personal digital experiences.
  • The sharing/gig/on-demand economy is an example of the significant digitally enabled changes in people’s behaviors and expectations that are redefining the nature of work, business models and risk profiles.
  • The rapid emergence of technologies and the explosion of data are combining to create a magnified impact. Technology and data are making it easier and more profitable to reach, underwrite and service commercial and specialty market segments. In particular, insurers can narrow and specialize various segments into new niches. In addition, the combination of technology and data is disrupting other industries, changing existing business models and creating businesses and risks that need new types of insurance.
  • New products can be deployed on demand, and industry boundaries are blurring. Traditional insurance or new forms of insurance may be embedded in the purchase of products and services.

Insurtech is re-shaping this new digital world and disrupting the traditional insurance value chain for commercial and specialty insurance, leading to specialty protection for a new era of business. Consider insurtech startups like Embroker, Next Insurance, Ask Kodiak, CoverWallet, Splice and others. Not being left behind, traditional insurers are creating innovative business models for commercial and specialty insurance, like Berkshire Hathaway with biBERK for direct to small business owners; Hiscox, which offers small business insurance (SBI) products directly from its website; or American Family, which invested in AssureStart, now part of Homesite, a direct writer of SBI.

The Domino Effect

We all likely played with dominoes in our childhood, setting them up in a row and seeing how we could orchestrate a chain reaction. Now, as adults, we are seeing and playing with dominoes at a much higher level. Every business has been or likely will be affected by a domino effect.

What is different in today’s business era, as opposed to even a decade ago, is that disruption in one industry has a much broader ripple effect that disrupts the risk landscape of multiple other industries and creates additional risks. We are compelled to watch the chains created from inside and outside of insurance. Recognizing that this domino effect occurs is critical to developing appropriate new product plans that align to these shifts.

Just consider the following disrupted industries and then think about the disrupters and their casualties: taxis and ridesharing (Lyft, Uber), movie rentals (Blockbuster) and streaming video (NetFlix), traditional retail (Sears and Macy’s) and online retail, enterprise systems (Siebel, Oracle) and cloud platforms (Salesforce and Workday), and book stores (Borders) and Amazon. Consider the continuing impact of Amazon, with the announcement about acquiring Whole Foods and the significant drop in stock prices for traditional grocers. Many analysts noted that this is a game changer with massive innovative opportunities.

The transportation industry is at the front end of a massive domino-toppling event. A report from RethinkX, The Disruption of Transportation and the Collapse of the Internal-Combustion Vehicle and Oil Industries, says that by 2030 (within 10 years of regulatory approval of autonomous vehicles (AVs)), 95% of U.S. passenger miles traveled will be served by on-demand autonomous electric vehicles owned by fleets, not individuals, in a new business model called “transportation-as-a-service” (TaaS). The TaaS disruption will have enormous implications across the automotive industry, but also many other industries, including public transportation, oil, auto repair shops and gas stations. The result is that not just one industry could be disrupted … many could be affected by just one domino … autonomous vehicles. Auto insurance is in this chain of disruption.

See also: Leveraging AI in Commercial Insurance  

And commercial insurance, because it is used by all businesses to provide risk protection, is also in the chain of all those businesses affected – a decline in number of businesses, decline in risk products needed and decline in revenue. The domino effect will decimate traditional business, product and revenue models, while creating growth opportunities for those bold enough to begin preparing for it today with different risk products.

Transformation + Creativity = Opportunity

Opportunity in insurance starts with transformation. New technologies will be enablers on the path to innovative ideas. As the new age of insurance unfolds, insurers must recommit to their business transformation journey and avoid falling into an operational trap or resorting to traditional thinking. In this changing insurance market, new competitors don’t play by the rules of the past. Insurers need to be a part of rewriting the rules for the future, because there is less risk when you write the new rules. One of those rules is diversification. Diversification is about building new products, exploring new markets and taking new risks. The cost of ignoring this can be brutal. Insurers that can see the change and opportunity for commercial and specialty lines will set themselves apart from those that do not.

For a greater in-depth look at the implications of commercial insurance shifts, be sure to downloadA New Age of Insurance: Growth Opportunities for Commercial and Specialty Insurance at a Time of Market Disruption.