Tag Archives: National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention

Employers’ Role in Preventing Suicide

American adults working full time spend an average of 47 hours per week at their workplace (Gallup 2013). For those dealing with a mental health issue or thoughts of suicide, employers have an important opportunity to create safeguards to protect those who may be at risk.

There are many reasons why an employee may keep concerns about his or her mental health private. Stigma, fear of losing one’s job, and lack of awareness can prevent an individual from seeking help. It can also prevent someone who is concerned about a co-worker from reaching out when they may be needed most.

Research shows that 70% of those who die by suicide tell someone or give warning signs before taking their own life. Coworkers see each other every day and are more apt to notice changes in mood and behavior. For this reason, they play a key role in identifying potential suicide risk and mental health crises in their peers.

See also: Blueprint for Suicide Prevention  

Mental health education and awareness programs can help to create an environment where employees feel comfortable reaching out for help and should be a primary component of workplace wellness initiatives. Employers can implement the following strategies that not only connect their employees with help but also promote a culture of mental health awareness:

Health Promotion

Health promotion programs enable employees to take action to better their health. While employers often use health promotion to encourage physical health changes, employers can use health promotion to discuss mental health issues and encourage a culture of employee engagement and connection, as well. National Depression Screening Day, held on Oct. 6 this year, raises awareness for depression and related mood and anxiety disorders. The annual campaign provides employers with an opportunity to start the conversation with employees about mental health.

Online Screenings

Anonymous online screenings are a proven way to reach those in need and help direct them to appropriate assistance. Employees can take a screening to determine if the symptoms they are experiencing are consistent with a mental health disorder (i.e., depression, generalized anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, an eating disorder or a substance use disorder). Upon completion of a screening, employees are provided with immediate results and linked back to employee assistance program or local community resources. If your organization does not currently have an online screening program, a more general anonymous screening can be taken here.

Suicide Prevention Awareness

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently released data showing a 24% increase on average of suicide rates from 1999 to 2014. It is critical that employees learn how to talk with someone about mental health, understand how to recognize warning signs of suicide and know the actions to take to get themselves or a coworker the help they need.

The National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention’s Workplace Task Force champions suicide prevention as a national priority and cultivates effective programming and resources within the workplace. The task force provides support for employers and motivates them to implement a comprehensive, public health approach to suicide prevention, intervention and “postvention” in the workplace. Programs like the Workplace Task Force are important sources of knowledge and assistance for employers.

See also: 6 Things to Do to Prevent Suicides  

Employers can provide resources such as Stop a Suicide Today, which educates individuals about the warning signs of suicide and steps to take if they are concerned about a coworker or loved one. There are also other lifesaving resources, like the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-TALK (8255)).

The World Health Organization estimates that depression will be the second leading cause of disability by 2020. Employers have the option to act as catalysts for early detection and prevention when it comes to mental health disorders and suicide, which can lead to improved quality of life for individuals, as well as for the organization itself.

Blueprint for Suicide Prevention

On Sept. 3, 2015, a press release was issued by the Carson J Spencer Foundation; RK, a construction company in Denver; and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. This press release was timed to coincide with Suicide Prevention Month in September and World Suicide Prevention Day on Sept. 10 . This press release announced the distribution of A Blueprint for the Construction Industry: Suicide Prevention in the Workplace (aka The Blueprint). One year later, we believe  that this document was a catalyst in developing a national movement in suicide prevention in construction. This articles tracks the milestones of this movement and future directions.

In 2010, the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention and its Workplace Task Force were launched in conjunction with World Suicide Prevention Day. The co-authors served as inaugural members of the Workplace Force. The Blueprint was intended to create awareness, generate advocacy and spur action in the construction industry around suicide prevention. In addition, The Blueprint provided a toolkit for how to discuss mental health and suicide prevention in the construction industry.

Equipped with The Blueprint, the co-authors began an initiative to break the silence and create a culture of caring. The co-authors sought to gain the attention of the construction industry through a media saturation campaign. The intent was to build a reproducible model within the construction industry that could subsequently be used as a reproducible model by other industries. In short, the coauthors sought to integrate mental health and suicide prevention in safety, health, wellness and employee benefit programs by framing the topics as the “next frontier in safety.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published a report that placed the construction and extraction industry as second-highest in the nation for suicide rates.

But, a year later, The Blueprint has exceeded expectations. It spawned an outpouring of targeted action that is rippling throughout the construction industry. The impact has been felt in: publications, presentations, projects and partnerships.

Publications

The publishing of The Blueprint created demand for articles by major independent construction industry publications and those published by trade associations. There have been at least 28 unique articles published since the first one was posted online by the Construction Financial Management Association (CFMA) on Nov. 1, 2015.

See also: Union Pacific Leads on Suicide Prevention

These articles have included both in-print and online versions. The articles have begun to cross over from construction into architecture and engineering, to make this an issue that is being discussed in the integrated AEC industry. The articles have penetrated major industry brands, including Engineering News-Record (ENR); the Associated General Contractors of America’s Constructor; CFMA’s Building Profits; Associated Builders and Contractor’s Construction Executive; Construction Business Owner; and the National Association of Women in Construction’s Image.

Presentations

Once articles were appearing in industry publications, it was easier to solicit presentations. The first presentation that Cal Beyer gave regarding suicide prevention was the September 2015 CFMA Southwest Regional Conference, where he included suicide prevention as part of his company’s commitment to Safety 24/7: safety at work, home and play. The second presentation he delivered was to the South Sound Chapter of the National Association of Women in Construction in November 2015 near Seattle. These two early successes made it easier to “sell” the concept of presentations.

Sally Spencer-Thomas presented at the January 2016 Men’s Health Conversation at the White House in January 2016, while Beyer presented at the pre-meeting at the Department of Health and Human Services. The next two presentations were led by Spencer-Thomas in February 2016 at an executive roundtable sponsored by Lendlease in Chicago and to the Associated General Contractors of Washington. More than 100 attendees heard Beyer’s presentation at the Pacific Northwest Forum of the National Association of Women in Construction in April 2016. Two sessions were facilitated at the CFMA Annual Conference in June 2016. Similar sessions were offered in Portland, OR, in June to the AGC of Oregon and in Boise, ID, in July for the Idaho Chapter of CFMA .

The marquee event was held in Phoenix on April 7, 2016, when more than 100 attendees participated in the CFMA’s Regional Suicide Prevention Summit. Similar summits are scheduled by CFMA chapters for Charlotte on Nov. 9, 2016, in Portland, on Nov. 16 and Chicago on Feb. 17, 2017. A series of summits have been proposed by numerous CFMA chapters in 2017, including: Denver; Washington, DC.; Indianapolis; Houston; and Las Vegas.

Projects and Partnerships

The first partnership was established with CFMA through publications — including the first article as well as two custom PDF publications highlighting both the “why” and “how” to address suicide prevention in construction companies. Moreover, CFMA launched the aforementioned Construction Industry Alliance for Suicide Prevention and created an executive committee task force.

Clare Miller, the Executive Director of the Partnership for Workplace Mental Health, has been distributing periodic updates on the construction industry to her organization’s members. A partnership was formed with the JP Griffin Group, an employee benefits consultancy in Scottsdale, AZ. The Griffin Group created artwork for four custom poster templates that has been provided to the construction industry at no charge. Hoop 5 Networks, an IT system consulting company from San Diego, provided web development services for the Construction Working Minds website maintained by the Carson J Spencer Foundation.

Union Pacific invited Spencer-Thomas and Beyer to present in Omaha at the Railroad Suicide Prevention Summit on Aug. 24, 2016, so that rail industry leaders could transfer the lessons learned from construction to their own industry. Likewise, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs requested the construction industry be represented at its roundtable on suicide prevention on Aug. 30, 2016. While Beyer was not able to attend, he invited representatives from the CFMA and ABC associations to attend.

See also: A Manager’s Response to Workplace Suicide  

Finally, the best example of the growing partnership is the creation of a construction subcommittee on the workplace task force of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. There are now nine members on this subcommittee, and it is the largest subcommittee of the workplace task force. These subcommittee members represent a broad cross-section of the construction industry. The nine subcommittee members are:

  1. Cal Beyer; Risk Management Director; Lakeside Industries, Inc. (Issaquah, WA)
  2. Dr. Morgan Hembree; Leadership Consultant; Integrated Leadership System (Columbus, OH)
  3. David James; CFO; FNF, Inc. (Tempe, AZ)
  4. Tricia Kagerer; Risk Management Executive; American Contractors Insurance Group (ACIG); Dallas.
  5. Joe Patti; Vice President & CFO; Welsbach Electric Corporation (College Point, NY)
  6. Christian Moreno; Vice President; Health Risk Solutions; Lockton Dunning (Dallas)
  7. Bob Swanson; Retired President; Swanson & Youngdale, Inc. (Minneapolis)
  8. Sally Spencer-Thomas, CEO, Carson J Spencer Foundation (Denver)
  9. Bob VandePol; Executive Director, Employee Assistance program; Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Services (Grand Rapids, MI)
  10. Michelle Walker; Vice President Finance & Administration; Spec ialized Services Company (Phoenix)

Conclusion

Thus, in less than one year, the construction industry has moved from not thinking about suicide prevention to being a leading industry in the effort. In fact, in May 2015, Forbes published an article called, “What Construction Workers Could Teach Other Industries About Mental Health Awareness.” This demonstrated how broadly this awakening and action has been felt.

This first phase of garnering awareness and political will is critical in starting this national movement. The next phase is to institutionalize these efforts by bringing best practices in suicide prevention to companies, researching outcomes to better understand what works and developing policy and procedures that support mentally healthy, resilient and psychologically safe workplaces.

How to Address Eating Disorders at Work

In America, 30 million people will struggle with an eating disorder at some point in their life. With statistics this high, it is likely that someone you know, or perhaps even you, has struggled with this mental health issue. Family members, friends and even coworkers can struggle with anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorder. Despite their prevalence, eating disorders are treatable. It is important to know the signs and symptoms as well as what to do if someone you know is at risk—especially in the workplace.

Our workplaces are often a source of stress. Deadlines, long hours and strained relationships can leave us feeling tired and vulnerable. When we feel down, we can be more susceptible to mental illness, including eating disorders, and stressful times can exacerbate existing conditions. With eating disorders, as with most illnesses, early intervention is important.

Businesses are in an excellent position to help employees who may be struggling with an eating disorder. Wellness programs can help raise awareness and encourage treatment. And anonymous screening programs can be an effective way to assist employees.

Anonymous and confidential mental health screenings are designed to help individuals examine any thoughts or behaviors that may be associated with eating disorders. After completing the self-assessment, users are provided with helpful resources and treatment information, if necessary. Although the screenings are not diagnostic, they will determine if someone is exhibiting symptoms associated with an eating disorder and if that someone should seek help.

Some common eating disorder signs and symptoms include:

  • Frequent comments about feeling “fat” or overweight
  • In general, behaviors and attitudes indicating that weight loss, dieting and the control of food are becoming primary concerns
  • Skipping meals or taking small portions of food at regular meals
  • Hiding body with baggy clothes
  • Evidence of binge eating, including disappearance of large amounts of food in short periods or lots of wrappers and containers indicating consumption of large amounts of food
  • Maintaining an excessive, rigid exercise regimen—despite weather, fatigue, illness or injury—because of the need to “burn off” calories
  • Drinking excessive amounts of water or using excessive amounts of mouthwash, mints and gum

If you are concerned that a coworker may have an eating disorder, there are things you can do to help. Rather than focus on issues related to their physical appearance, let your coworker know you have noticed a change in their behavior. Perhaps the quality of their work has suffered or their mood has changed. Let them know that you care and offer helpful resources. If your workplace offers a wellness or screening program, share that information. Anonymous eating disorder screenings are always available at MyBodyScreening.org. Be sure to follow-up with the coworker to see how they are doing. Support systems are important as they work toward recovery.

The National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention is a public-private partnership advancing the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention, put forward by the U.S. surgeon general. The alliance supports mental health and suicide prevention programs in the workplace and endorses mental health screenings as part of those programs. Screenings can make a difference in mental health and suicide prevention.

As millions of adults struggle with eating disorders, workplaces can make an impact by spreading awareness, offering screenings and encouraging treatment. It is in the best interest of an employer to help workers stay healthy and productive. Wellness and screening programs are a proven way to do this.