Tag Archives: mp3

Is It Time to Buy a Biometric Scanner?

Identity theft is still out there, keeping pace with the latest innovations and security measures and snaring new victims every day. With the advent of cheaper, standalone, easy-to-integrate biometric technology for authentication, is it time to buy a fingerprint scanner?

What’s a biometric scanner?

Biometric technology uses physical or biological information, like a fingerprint, retinal scan or heartbeat, to authenticate a person’s identity. You can currently purchase the most commonplace biometric scanner—that is, one that uses a fingerprint—starting at around $50. The scanner can be used to protect computers and other devices that support biometric scanning technology.

Do biometrics provide additional security?

The short answer: Yes.

Authentication can effectively use three things to keep the wrong people out: something you know, something you have and something you are. We’re all familiar with the first line of defense. “What you know” takes the form of security questions, passwords and a security picture, and there are various strategies to keep it all straight.

Some choose to use password managers or proprietary systems like Apple’s iCloud Keychain. Others prefer to have an encrypted personal security list (logins, passwords) stored on a cloud server. Still others put “what they know” (but couldn’t possibly remember) on a USB stored on a keychain or in a safe if the information is not encrypted. And, yes, some go a little further, choosing to use a fingerprint-encrypted drive (i.e., biometrics). How you manage what you know comes down to personal preference, but the first line of defense is not fail-safe. In fact, there are hacks and breaches all the time. (If you believe you were the victim of a hack, you can view two of your free credit scores on Credit.com for signs of identity theft.)

See also: Are Passwords Finally Becoming Passé?  

The second line of defense, “something you have,” could be access to an email account, a key fob or your mobile phone. You need to have your phone in hand, for instance, to receive the verification code so you can get waved through some digital security checks. This is called two-factor authentication—and, yes, it’s more secure than simply protecting accounts with an alphanumerical password.

The last line of defense, “something you are,” is a really hot topic right now. As I mentioned earlier, in sophisticated systems, this might include a scan of your retina, your finger- or handprints, your body weight (including ups and downs), your height, your face or all of the above. This information is clearly specific to you—and not so easily replicated—so, again, it’s miles more secure that the old standard password or even two-factor authentication.

Needless to say, were you to implement a security protocol that combined all three of the above protocols of authentication, a) criminals would have a really hard time making any money, but b) we would all be frustrated.

Does it have a place in the home?

Biometric authenticators have been the security mode for quite some time in the military and wherever large amounts of money or gold or drugs or weapons are stored, as seen in countless spy and heist movies, but they are slowly making their way into people’s homes.

From smartphones to gun lockers to personal computers, a steady march of devices is offering a biometric element for the user-authentication process. One example comes by way of a new secure credit card being tested by MasterCard in a chain of supermarkets in South Africa. The card is able to store an encrypted copy of the user’s fingerprint, which would make it exceedingly difficult for a scammer to beat.

(Would it be impossible to beat? As with all great capers, only the crooks know for sure. There was a flurry of coverage not too long ago about how photos of people flashing a peace sign could lead to the theft of their fingerprints, thanks to the proliferation of high-definition cameras. But fact-checking website Snopes listed the story as “Unproven,” and for good reason. While it is theoretically possible, no criminals have been caught doing it.)

Should I buy a fingerprint scanner?

Here’s the rub: You won’t really need to.

Unless you were born a long time ago, you may not know what an 8-track is. It came before the cassette tape, which preceded the CD, which is the grandfather of the MP3. When you want to make a point about obsolescence, there are few better examples than those clunky old tapes. I bring them up because current standalone biometric scanners are without a doubt the 8-track of digital security devices.

See also: Biometrics and Fraud Prevention: Seeing Eye to Eye  

If you accept the similarity between biometric scanning devices and MP3 players, the answer to the question above will be crystal clear. These days, MP3s can be played by all the devices we use most. We’re seeing the same thing happen with biometric scanning.

Whether it’s a smartphone, a computer or MasterCard’s new fingerprint-encrypted cards, all stripes of products you use on a daily basis eventually will feature built-in biometric scanners. And, if you are buying something today and prefer devices with built-in (rather than bolt-on) security, don’t despair. There already are plenty of choices out there. Case in point: Anyone with the latest generation of a particular smartphone likely has the option of locking and unlocking the device with their thumb.

Personally, unless and until all devices that should be secure feature biometric scanners, I would suggest opting for those that do—much in the same way I’d advise you to refrain from using “1234” as your password. You can learn more about biometric technology, how it works (and whether it can be hacked) here.

Full disclosure: CyberScout sponsors ThirdCertainty. This story originated as an Op/Ed contribution to Credit.com and does not necessarily represent the views of the company or its partners.

This post originally appeared on ThirdCertainty.

The Need for Speed: It Just Keeps Intensifying

At the recent meeting of the Insurance Accounting & Systems Association, President Bill Clinton said in his keynote speech, “Share the future or fight over it.”

As an industry, we have a history of collaborating, which has benefited all of us, but we need to raise the bar to succeed in this fast-changing world. Other industries and businesses are changing all around us and seeking to encroach on and challenge insurance. So we must embrace open innovation, collaboration, crowdsourcing and ideation with new standards and at higher levels within companies, within the industry and even between industries.

The topics of innovation, change, and emerging technologies were the focus of this year’s IASA “Around the Horn” industry analyst panel. I had the pleasure of representing SMA, and as I prepared for the panel session I found myself taking a step back. I realized that when leveraging the vast base of SMA research and insights and blending that with the broader strategic business implications for the industry, a powerful story emerged. A wave of disruption and innovation has hit our industry with an intensity that we didn’t quite expect.

In the spirit of sharing, for those who did not attend, here is a summary of my rapid-fire responses to the panel questions to help inspire you, challenge you and get you to embrace collaboration as an industry to help you quickly define your future:

–Innovation is happening all around us. We are at the forefront of what is probably the greatest disruption in history: the digital revolution. And it is affecting every industry. This revolution is fueled by the breadth and depth of the new technologies that are changing customer engagement, transforming products and services, redefining business and revenue models, breaking down barriers to new entrants and more – look at the Apple iPhone, introduced 7 years ago, and the resulting destruction and construction of industries and businesses. Today, the bar is set at a new high. Operational excellence is an absolute. Innovation is necessary for future success. And the Next-Gen Insurer is being defined and shaped.

–Insurers must have a strong culture that combines the power of open innovation with an ecosystem that empowers collaboration. If we don’t define our own future as an industry, other industries may try to step in and define it for us.

–We must focus on the constantly connected customer. We all must recognize that, in this digital revolution, the customer is in control and is defining the channels that he or she wants to use – from purchasing through service. As insurers seek to become digital insurers, they must have unified digital strategies that create seamless, consistent and connected customer experiences in an omni-channel environment. Think like Google, Zappos, Apple, Nike, AT&T and others that are the new digital leaders.

–Product development and configuration are key differentiation levers. These capabilities are shaping today’s competitive landscape, with speed to market of paramount importance. The pressure to stay current, deliver new offerings and price accurately is driving many insurers to seek innovative solutions. The average new product implementation timeline is nearly 7.5 months. Less than 2% of insurers can implement in less than 30 days. But some innovative companies have found a way to implement in less than 5 days! Another emerging capability of even greater importance is the enabling of product co-creation – customers can help to configure their own products according to their wants and needs.

–Usage based insurance (UBI) is not just about product; it’s a whole new business model. UBI moves the focus from risk assessment to risk prevention. And its application is much larger than auto insurance. It is about the connected car, the connected home and the connected life. UBI is the precursor of a broader impact of sensors and the Internet of Things that will allow us to connect the dots between data for new customer products, services, outcomes and experiences – providing a real-time view of risk.

–Data is the new currency in the digital world. Data has always been seen as the lifeblood of the industry, but its strategic value is now at the forefront. And big data, business intelligence and analytics continue to take the insurance industry by storm. What is holding insurers back is the lack of a data management strategy and a deficient level of data mastery. Both strategy and mastery will be needed to unlock the full business value of data, whether transactional, unstructured, internal or external.

–Social media is a subset of digital data. Customers are sharing information about all aspects of their lives – social, pictures, online discussions, GPS, sensors, mobile technologies and more – and all this data is in the cloud. People are able to search their recorded memories and use new tools that can influence and shape their lives like never before. New companies are creating digital lockers for data that can be stored and managed by customers to be used in innovative ways. When new solutions like these form around customer logging activities, the question from customers will be: “Is the value of what I’m revealing worth the services I’m receiving in return?” The key issue will be the customers’ control of their data.

–Digitalization is happening and is dramatically destructive. A foundational change is taking place in the way all businesses are approaching value creation. In today’s hyper-connected world, companies are moving from managing value chains to managing ecosystems to power their businesses. The ubiquitous connectivity of people via the Internet and emerging technologies is disrupting traditional business assumptions about how to engage customers, the products and services offered and, ultimately, business and revenue models. Just look at these transformations: from the Yellow Pages to Yelp, hailing a cab to Uber or Lyft, booking a hotel to Airbnb and policemen managing traffic to managing traffic with crowdsourcing Waze. All of these represent the disruption happening all around insurance and point to the imminent disruption that will transpire within insurance.

–Mobile is much broader than the phone and tablet. It includes smartphones, MP3 players, e-readers, in-dash car electronics, cameras, portable consoles, home entertainment, appliances and any device or sensor that connects to the internet to share data. And there is now a continuing evolution of mobile apps from multi-purpose websites or portals to single-purpose apps. This will compel companies to design apps as a service layer within an enterprise technical architecture that will enable seamless integration and connectivity between apps – critically important with the Internet of Things.

–Cloud is increasingly mainstream because that is where the data is moving. Two years ago, it was an option in core system RFPs, whereas today it is increasingly a preferred choice. The future will be the Cloud of Things, a world of distributed data, devices, technology, intelligence, computing, etc. that is highly connected and will enable the creation of products and services.

–The issue is “customer empowerment,” not “customer-centricity.” Customer-centricity is a 1990s/early 2000s term and is only a subset of customer empowerment. We used to shape the customer experience; now it is shaped for us by the rest of the world. Customer empowerment defines new engagement models. As customers gain market power, they are increasingly comfortable with technology, have a stronger voice and use it to demand collaboration. Insurers must view all technology as touching customers, because it influences the customer experience, both directly and indirectly, ultimately shaping and defining the customer relationship.

–As an industry, we are seeing challenges to our long-held assumptions and business models coming at us every day. Technology is now super-connected, creating new experiences, new products and services, new outcomes and new business and revenue models that were not possible a few years ago. Just as the iPhone provided a platform of possibilities, core systems – integrated with an array of new technologies like mobile, social, Internet of Things, cloud, big data, analytics, driverless vehicles, biotechnology and much more – have the potential to transform our industry … and to do it on our own terms.

So be inspired. Be creative. Be collaborative. Be bold. Let’s create and share the future together!