Tag Archives: market disruption

2016 Latin America Insurance Outlook

Despite sluggish economic growth and troubling inflation in key markets, the 2016 insurance market outlook for Latin America remains relatively bright. The rollout of new insurance products and distribution approaches at a time of low market penetration should drive strong growth for insurers. Insurance premium growth is expected to rise by around 6% to 7% in 2016 and possibly beyond should the economic environment improve as expected. At the same time, the emergence of end-to-end digital capabilities is transforming the Latin American insurance market. This digital market disruption will force insurers to make rapid revisions to existing business models to stay competitive and build market share.

Customer expectations rising

Commercial customers will continue to require more sophisticated insurance solutions in 2016, including coverage for business interruption, cyber security, civil unrest and errors and omissions. Latin American consumers, many of whom are young, cosmopolitan and tech-savvy, will continue to push for new insurance channels and services that fit their lifestyle. To respond, insurers will need to simplify and adapt products for Millennials and sharpen their focus on mobile and social media interactions. Evolving customer needs throughout the region are compelling insurance companies to rethink their strategies, processes and services. The rise of financial technology, or fintech, companies is causing insurers, particularly in the consumer insurance sector, to reconsider their business models and increase their investment in new digital technologies. Despite a desire to avoid conflicts with legacy models, insurers realize that flexibility, efficiency and innovation are critical for success in a more demanding marketplace

Competition heating up

The liberalization of industry regulation across Latin America has opened insurance markets to wider competition. The abundance of insurance capital has intensified competition from various directions: from global insurers seeking a foothold in the region to local insurers looking to expand cross country to entrenched insurers defending their turf. These competitive trends are keeping insurance rates flat through much of the region and, in some cases, pushing them lower. The most substantial rate decreases have been in non-catastrophe property.

Pockets of premium increases can be found in areas of instability, such as Venezuela. However, insurance capacity is very limited for Venezuelan political risk, with most risks dependent on the international reinsurance market.

As markets develop in Latin America, commercial demand is increasing for new forms of insurance coverage, such as environmental liability. The opening of the oil industry to the private sector in Mexico, for example, is exposing new oil exploration and production entrants to potential losses from environmental damages. But market capacity is still restrained in key markets, such as Brazil, where only a few insurers offer such liability coverage.

Read our Market Outlook for LATAM Insurance in 2016 to understand more about the dynamics facing the South America Market here.

6 Trends Signaling Major Opportunity

Last year, I decided to pursue a career transition as a full-time occupation. I’ve been out in the market for the past six months, assessing business opportunities as I network with executives in financial services, healthcare, media and retail, as well as with VCs, private equity investors and advisers.

What’s been great is that invariably any role in any organization, however broad, will be framed by the priorities that drive the business, which may be using a short-range lens defined by the annual plan, or one that doesn’t offer much of a peripheral view.  Transition-as-occupation offers full permission to set the aperture and depth of field for insight-gathering and exploration.

What has also been remarkable is not only the generosity of many people at the top of their respective fields to share perspectives, but also how I’ve been able to help others by playing the role of connector among people who may not normally meet up with each other, but who are excited to understand how others are addressing common questions in a complex and changing environment.

Here are six connected trends on the collective mind of the leaders with whom I’ve met. They represent a snapshot of what I am hearing. Within them are opportunities to be realized across this industry:

  • Customer-centricity – is it talk or walk? C-suiters certainly verbalize that “customer-centricity” matters, but few teams demonstrate that empathizing with the customer is bedrock for viable, win/win relationships, growth and profit improvement. The phrase has as many definitions as (or more than) the number of people defining it. Most significantly, the connection to concrete, quantifiable business priorities is generally missing. For those who get beyond the buzzwords, there is tremendous tangible value, even disruptive opportunity, in being a customer-focused player in this sector.
  • Old norms don’t work…digital and innovation are essential. Businesses are faced with redesigning processes, structures and metrics, recruiting more agile learners who are also able to deliver and overcoming legacy infrastructure to adopt new technologies. This level of change in the way businesses operate is not for the faint-hearted. The companies that take on these real implementation requirements will gain ground.
  • Yes, technology truly is changing everything. Even with greater efficiency, there is no growth without compelling offerings that meet big market needs. For companies engineered to serve baby boomers, serving the millennial generation requires profound change, not just a digital coat of paint. The implications go way beyond having a social media presence, cool apps and clever advertising. The millennial generation is inheriting a different world, re-shaped in good and bad ways by prior generations.  The starting point for progress is to be truly insight-led, and not presume you know what people want and need.
  • The marketing bar is being raised. This discipline has been disrupted, and more is being demanded. Traditionally viewed as “support” people, marketers are now being held to results that require a different seat at the table, a different talent profile, processes and resources and an entirely new set of connections with colleagues and external partners. Begin by redefining relationships, especially with product, IT and sales internally, and with the advertising and media agencies as key outside partners.
  • Two tales are playing out within financial services. Legacy institutions remain heavily focused on regulation, compliance, expense reduction and cyber security…while fin tech is hot, with capital flowing into payments, wealth management, consumer lending and related start-ups pursuing market disruption and reshaping the industry. Start-ups are doing great things in this sector and will keep incumbents on their toes, as well as representing potential acquisition opportunities as a strategy to modernize. Alignment around a clear strategy and a collaborative culture are at the foundation of leading change vs. playing defense.
  • Healthcare disruption is creating opportunities, but the pace is slow. Payers and providers are aiming to address Affordable Care Act and other government, employer and consumer-driven impacts.  Using electronic medical records, controlling employer healthcare expenses and enabling patient accountability for medical care decisions are just three of many big and complex challenges. The road to change will be long and slow given the sheer complexity and fragmentation of healthcare delivery. As in financial services, new entrants are leading innovation with solutions that address elements of the ecosystem. As in financial services, there is room for incumbents to realize opportunity with the right strategic and cultural conditions.