Tag Archives: managed service provider

5 Questions That Thwart Ransomware

This past summer was something of a perfect storm for small businesses, which weathered an increase in ransomware attacks, which in many cases started with an IT vendor or managed service provider (MSP).

Ransomware incidents reported to our company were up 37% in the third quarter when compared with the first three months of the year, and 24% were confirmed to be caused by a vendor or MSP.

Those statistics are bad news for small businesses that manage their IT resources with the help of a MSP and worse news for small businesses that outsource their entire IT operation to the MSP, which includes everything from building the network and managing applications to servicing any and all IT requests.

In fact, in the first nine months of last year, 63% of all the ransomware incidents reported to our breach response unit came from small businesses, many of which rely on an MSP. Why is that figure so high? MSPs make ripe targets for ransomware attacks.

They have to balance, on the one hand, a need for speed and convenience when it comes to being able to respond to clients and, on the other hand, the need to have the right security controls in place. Too often, speed and convenience win out over security controls.

For example, in many cases, MSPs have reused credentials across clients so that MSP employees can service multiple clients more quickly. Similarly, MSPs might not enable multi-factor authentication (MFA) on the remote access point they use to pivot to client environments.

See also: How Municipalities Avoid Ransomware  

In many incidents in the third quarter, attackers exploited the remote management application that connects the MSP to the client. The same MSP user account would log into multiple client environments and install ransomware. If the MSP had set up individual user accounts for each of its clients, it is more likely that the exploitation of the single set of credentials would have only enabled unauthorized access to a single client’s environment, diminishing the risk to their clients.

Further, an MSP user account often has to have full administrative access to assist with regular IT functions, so, when credentials were compromised, the attackers had full administrative access to clients’ environments.

So, why the increase in MSP ransomware attacks this summer? According to Bill Siegel, CEO and co-founder of ransomware response platform Coveware, hackers have found a way to magnify the attacks on MSPs. Specifically, developers of Sodinokibi ransomware are now using techniques employed originally by GandCrab ransomware to make the attacks on MSPs more profitable.

These MSP ransomware attacks over the summer exposed incident response challenges. For small businesses that completely rely on outsourced IT, a massive ransomware attack across clients draws on the MSP’s resources and inevitably leaves many businesses in the dark. Small business owners without a technical background struggle to understand and assist the external legal and forensics vendors who are hired to help them respond to the attack.

The response is further complicated when the MSP itself is also infected with ransomware. Where an attack group knows it has hit an MSP, and infected downstream clients, the group may refuse to negotiate with the end clients and instead only respond to the MSP to increase ransom demands. This tactic can also leave clients with little to no control over their data software recovery.

For all of these reasons, we urge small businesses to ask the following important questions when vetting a potential MSP:

  1. Is there a security program in place, including periodic risk assessments to identify areas for improvement?
  2. Is there continuing security awareness training across the organization?
  3. Is there a SSAE 18 SOC 2 Type II report or similar type of report available to customers, attesting to security control environment?
  4. If access to personally identifiable information or protected health information is necessary, how is this protected at the vendor (e.g. encryption, secure remote connections, restricted access, logging and monitoring)?
  5. Are security and availability requirements enforced in master service agreement contracts (e.g. sensitive data protection, up-time guarantee/service level agreements, security incident reporting/coordination, regulatory compliance requirements)?

Our third-quarter statistics clearly show that small businesses and MSPs are big targets for hackers. It is absolutely critical that small businesses are working hand-in-hand with all their IT vendors to prevent ransomware attacks from happening in the first place.