Tag Archives: law

The ‘Law’ Every Attorney Must Know

If lawyers are to represent insurers, if they are to be counselors in the fullest sense of the word, if they are to anticipate and answer questions of the highest importance, they must understand how technology continues to transform the insurance industry as a whole.

They must not simply be aware of a few codicils and a minority of codes. They must be conversant with, so they can call and examine witnesses who are fluent in, the technology that influences everything from actuarial science to sales.

I write these words as someone who has a law degree. Thus, I know how rigid legal curricula are versus how dynamic technology is. One predates computers, smartphones and tablets, save the ceremonial kind outside a courthouse, while the other has an increasingly short lifespan—its debut is also its death, because the one law not on the books is the law every lawyer should learn.

I refer to Moore’s law. From careful observation of an emerging trend, Gordon Moore extrapolated that computing would dramatically increase in power, and decrease in relative cost, at an exponential pace.

See also: 2 Steps to Transform Claims, Legal Group  

According to Wayne R. Cohen, a professor at George Washington University School of Law and a partner at Cohen & Cohen, Moore’s law is crucial to how lawyers and insurers work together. He says:

“More laws are not the solution to Moore’s law. What we need instead are competent lawyers who can advise insurers and be advocates for the rights of the insured, but within the changing technological landscape.”

I agree with Cohen’s point for several reasons. First is the health of the insurance industry. Insurers cannot succeed without lawyers to advise them, unless they want to issue policies that will compound their liabilities and weaken their ability to survive.

Second, we cannot forfeit 2.7% of gross domestic product (GDP), or $507.7 billion, because a majority of lawyers cannot write the language necessary for insurers to underwrite the policies that consumers want to buy and that employers need to purchase. To repeat: We cannot have the innumerate or the technologically illiterate endorse what they do not know and cannot read, as if they were to register their approval by drawing an uppercase X on the signature line of a document, in lieu of confessing their own shortcomings.

Third, unless insurers raise the technoloy issue with law schools or until the American Bar Association (ABA) raises the bar of competency, so to speak, new lawyers will find it difficult to get work and pay down their student loans.

See also: 3 Major Areas of Opportunity  

Let insurers be agents of change. Let them be agents that not only sell policies but help set public policy. Let them reach a verdict—let them issue a ruling as binding as any legal precedent—that is too decisive to reverse and too clear to reject.

Lawyers who join this movement will inspire their colleagues to follow suit. They will be at the vanguard of law, technology and insurance. Their actions will ensure the safety of all we seek to insure.

Jurors and Questions on Insurance Coverage

For most potential jurors, questions of insurance coverage do not usually arise in common conversation. Seldom cut and dried, usually subject to numerous definitions and intricacies, coverage issues can be boring and puzzling for even an experienced adjuster. Asking a lay person to try to classify an “occurrence” as defined by a policy, or whether a third party is covered as an additional insured, may prompt, at best, glazed-over eyes or, even worse, a negative commentary about insurance companies. While it may be best in some situations for a judge to determine the issue of insurance coverage, this is not always possible. Sometimes, coverage questions arise in litigation, and those interpreting policy language and determining the outcome are jurors. If jurors are deciding the issues, certain challenges then arise, such as how to clarify policy language, present a clear and concise argument and overcome negative preconceptions about the insurance industry.

Can the Judge Decide Coverage Issues?

In Louisiana, general rules regarding issues that are triable by a jury are set forth in Louisiana Code of Civil Procedure articles 1731 – 1736. These establish the general rule that a demand for a trial by jury will result in a trial by jury of all issues. However, exceptions to the general rule exist when: (a) the parties stipulate that the jury trial shall be as to certain issues only; (b) a party in his demand specifies the issues to be tried by a jury; or (c) the right to trial by jury as to certain issues does not exist. Where a jury trial has been demanded by one or both parties, the case must be tried by a jury unless both parties consent to trial without a jury or the trial court finds that a right to a trial by jury does not exist.

More particularly, La. C.C. P. art. 1562(D) specifically codified the general principle found in La. C.C. P. art. 1736 requiring a stipulation between or the consent of the parties before the trial judge can order that insurance coverage issues be tried separately, with the “court alone” deciding the issue of insurance coverage.

La. C.C.P. art. 1562(D) states:

“If it would simplify the proceedings or would permit a more orderly disposition of the case or otherwise would be in the interest of justice, at any time prior to trial on the merits, the court may order, with the consent of all parties, a separate trial on the issue of insurance coverage, unless a factual dispute that is material to the insurance coverage issue duplicates an issue relative to liability or damages. The issue of insurance coverage shall be decided by the court alone, whether or not there is to be a jury trial on the issue of liability or damages.”

The leading case on the subject is Citgo Petroleum Corp. v. Yeargin, Inc., 95-1574 (La. App. 3 Cir. 7/3/96), 678 So.2d 936, writ granted, remanded, 96-2000 (La. 11/15/96), 682 So.2d 746 and 96-2007 (La. 11/15/96), 682 So.2d 747. There, the court stated that La. C.C.P. art 1562(D) provided that, if principals of judicial efficiency or justice would be served then the court may order a separate trial on the issue of insurance coverage. However, the trial judge’s discretion is not unfettered. The judge’s ability to take the issue away from the jury is severely restricted because, under the article, all of the following conditions must exist: (1) it would simplify the proceedings, permit a more orderly disposition of the case, or be in the interest of justice; (2) the consent of all parties; (3) the non-existence of a factual dispute material to the coverage issue that duplicates an issue relative to liability or damages; and (4) the order must be rendered before trial on the merits.

Therefore, the requirements set forth in the article effectively leave the judge with no discretion, as it requires the consent of all parties. The court further noted that, while the issue of insurance coverage under an insurance policy is a narrow issue of the law between the alleged insured and the insurer, a jury is not prohibited, by statute or otherwise, from deciding this issue. Further, there is no exception to the right to trial by jury for issues that the trial judge may think are too technical or too complex for the jury to understand. Even if the trial judge believes that he is more capable than the jury of deciding the issue of coverage, he cannot take this issue away from the jury once the issue is included within the scope of issues for which a jury trial was requested, unless the conditions of La. C.C.P. art. 1562(D) are met.

As such, if a trial by jury has been requested, but an insurer is presenting technical questions of coverage and believes that a judge would be best suited to decide the coverage issue, a stipulation or the consent of all parties would be necessary before the judge could take the coverage issue away from the jury. Unfortunately, often the consent of all parties to separately try the coverage issue cannot be obtained, and the insurer is left with a jury to decide intricate and potentially costly coverage issues.

Selecting the Best Jury for Your Coverage Case

If coverage issues must be decided by a jury, the persons who make up that jury can make a difference in the outcome of the case. Questioning prospective jurors in voir dire about their current insurance policies and other contracts can provide some insight into how they view insurance companies and the potential for coverage. People often believe that they are “fully covered” under their insurance policies, and that insurers are large, prosperous companies that should be able to “help out” individuals. However, further questioning can reveal that potential jurors do understand that there are limitations as to what is covered under certain policies and what has been negotiated.

Questioning a potential juror about a policy he may currently have in place, whether that policy has a limit and if he understands that the insurance company would not be required to pay more than that limit, can show that the potential juror does understand some limitations to coverage. Additional questions may involve who the current policies provide coverage to and the limitations on that coverage. Even simple, and almost obvious, questions can help illustrate a potential juror’s understanding of coverage limitations. For example, discussing how an automobile policy might provide coverage for certain damage to an owned vehicle but would not cover general maintenance, oil changes or a monthly car payment can help provide insight into whether an individual may be able to understand the issues and be a constructive juror.

Additionally, general questions regarding the potential jurors’ opinion of insurance companies in general, personal claims experiences or inferences regarding insurers that the potential juror has taken from the media can provide insight into whether the potential juror might be favorable or undesirable from the insurer’s standpoint.

Presentation at Trial – Concise and Comprehensible

After a jury has been selected, helping jurors understand and follow the language and logic of the coverage argument is vital. The following tips may help simplify the coverage case and overcome obstacles when faced with presenting coverage issues to a jury.

1. Walk Jurors Through the Basics

Although often complex, insurance policies are simply contracts. They define a relationship between parties and outline who will do what, when and under what circumstances. Presenting the insurance policy as a simple contract, by identifying the promise between the parties and what each may receive in exchange for their promise, may help jurors be less apprehensive when approaching coverage issues.

A good place to start is with the basics of the policy and how it is structured. Discussing the declarations, insuring agreement, exclusions, definitions, conditions and endorsements allows jurors to get comfortable with the policy. After the policy and its purpose are explained, the specific provisions at issue can be addressed. An effective way to do this is by using demonstrative evidence, such as blowups of certain pages or Power Point presentations illustrating specific language and what it means. Presenting the policy through large exhibits helps break down the technicality for jurors and show that it is a logical and consistent contract.

Further, preparing an exhibit naming and listing the experience of all of the individuals who are involved in creating the policy, the claim investigation, adjustment and the coverage decision shows that time and thought of real individuals went into creating a well-organized document and making a well-thought-out coverage decision.

2. Humanize the Issues

Jurors often bring their own experiences to the courtroom and, sometimes, a bad impression of insurance companies. Further, oftentimes coverage disputes are coupled with bad faith claims, exacerbating the notion that insurance companies are malicious. To overcome these perceived notions and prejudices, it is key to humanize the insurer’s operations and show the jurors that real people have drafted the policies and handled the claims. Showing that the insurer is not just a large, faceless corporation, but individuals making decisions and doing their jobs, will help negate the insured’s presented image of an uncaring, profit-seeking business entity. While testimony from a vice president may be impressive, the agent who issued the policy or the adjuster who handled the claim may help put a more relatable face to the company.

Additionally, many insurers have adopted vision statements outlining a code of ethics or a commitment to the community. Using this at trial, and showing how the company is committed to its values or involved in the community, helps dispel negative ideas of an uncaring corporation.

Lastly, insurers should be careful about attacking the insured’s credibility or positions. While it may be necessary, the way this is presented to the jury can have a big impact and can erroneously further the negative ideas about the insurance company.

3. Show All Negotiations

Jurors will generally understand the concept of “you get what you pay for.” They know that if they contracted with their cable company and pay for only the basic channels, they do not get premium channels, such as HBO. It follows that jurors should understand that if underwriting documents or other evidence show what was discussed and understood between the parties, and this is reflected in the contract, this should be what governs. If evidence of negotiations is available, this should be presented to the jury. This concept may be particularly helpful in litigating commercial policies, where there is usually more negotiation, and in showing the application of policy exclusions.

4. Keep It Simple

As a general rule, the simpler the better. It is important to keep the insurance policy language from sounding too technical. Avoid overuse of legal terms and phrases, as this will only confuse jurors and may cause them to fall back on the generally accepted legal principle that “any ambiguity must be construed against the insurer.” A straightforward presentation, relying on only one or two strong coverage arguments, should be used. Presenting every argument possible is not always the best strategy, as this could bog down the jury and cause them to lose focus. When one or two key arguments are made, the case is tight and allows jurors to concentrate on the big picture, rather than trying to follow several moving parts.

Another tactic that may help bring the issues to a comfortable level is to compare the policy to other contracts jurors may have entered into. Outlining the limits and duties imposed by contracts that jurors may be more familiar with, such as a purchase agreement for a car, or a lease agreement for an apartment, may also help jurors realize that there are also limitations and duties imposed by insurance contracts, just like the contracts with which they are more familiar.

Additionally, working backward from the result being sought provides a road map for a streamlined argument and helps create a unifying theme throughout the litigation. Starting from the verdict form or jury instructions helps to keep concentration on the elements that need to be established or explained.

5. Apply Basic Jury Concepts

Basic concepts of persuasion, which apply to all jury litigation, can also be used effectively in a coverage case. Fairness must be stressed and run as a theme throughout the presentation of the coverage case. Jurors want to be fair and will try their best to do so. Additionally, any obvious weaknesses in the case should be addressed. Holes in the case, if not admitted to or explained, will create doubt.

Presenting a coverage case to a jury is sometimes unavoidable, but need not be too difficult or incomprehensible for jurors. Carefully questioning and selecting potential jurors, along with presenting a simple yet logical argument, while humanizing the insurance company, can help achieve a successful presentation of the case in the courtroom and, with that, a successful result.

Key Misunderstanding on Oklahoma Option

Most critics and supporters of the Oklahoma option (OKO) have one thing in common: a misunderstanding about the applicability of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA). In part, this misunderstanding is widespread because it hasn’t yet garnered the attention of tax authorities and attorneys, and those of us who aren’t tax attorneys are reluctant to engage this subject because we fear we will be misinterpreted as giving tax advice.

Let me be absolutely clear—nothing in this article should be construed as tax advice, as I am not qualified to offer such advice.

But the ProPublica and NPR journalists who assume ERISA must govern the taxation of OKO benefits simply because it governs the taxation of Texas nonsubscription (TXNS) benefits[1] aren’t qualified, either.

Put simply, ERISA’s governance of OKO workplace injury claims has yet to be demonstrated in any way, and it was certainly not confirmed by rulings in 2015 by two federal judges for the Western District of Oklahoma who considered the jurisdiction of federal courts over OKO-based claims and appeals processes..

There was never any intent in the Oklahoma legislation to have ERISA govern the OKO, and the term “ERISA” never appears—not once!—in the language of the Oklahoma law. Even more importantly, two-and-a-half years after passage, there is zero case law to support any claim that ERISA applies to OKO.

These revelations may be counterintuitive for industry insiders and regulators, but what should be intuitive is that state and federal court systems are in charge of ruling on state and federal laws. Consultants, employers, employees, investigative journalists, insurance carriers, brokers, attorneys, ivory tower experts, doctors and conference debaters don’t get to make such calls. The only ones whose opinions matter are the judges in a position to make these determinations, and the only two judges known to have had the opportunity to consider any issue concerning the relationship between the OKO and ERISA concluded that the judges did not have jurisdiction over cases where the employer sought to have ERISA govern employee appeals of decisions regarding occupational OKO claims.

In April 2015, Judge Joe Heaton of the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma issued an order regarding ERISA’s applicability to the occupational accident components of OKO plans in the case of Cavazos v. Harrah Nursing Center (aka Marsh Pointe) that, in part, reads:

“Marsh Pointe alleges … that, pursuant to the Oklahoma [Employee] Injury Benefit Act, it has elected to be exempt from the Administrative Workers’ Compensation Act and become a ‘qualified employer’ by meeting certain requirements including the adoption of a written benefit plan. That well may be. Nonetheless, the case [filed by the plaintiff] arose ‘under the workmen’s compensation laws’ of the State of Oklahoma. As such, it may not be removed to any district court of the United States.”

Judge Heaton’s ruling was a narrow one, aimed only at determining whether the federal court could exercise jurisdiction over the case before it. That case had been removed by the employer to federal court from the Oklahoma Workers’ Compensation Commission (OWCC), based on the assertion that ERISA ought to govern the employee’s pursuit of a claim against her employer’s OKO plan. The court held that, regardless of whether ERISA applied to certain aspects of the OKO plan, the employee’s claim arose under Oklahoma’s WC laws and, therefore, a specific federal jurisdictional statute (28 USC §1445(c)) prevented removal of the case to federal court. Judge Heaton sent the matter back to the OWCC, and his order made it crystal clear that such cases cannot be removed to the federal court system.[2] In other words, ERISA (a federal law) does not give federal courts jurisdiction over the occupational accident claims of employees whose injury benefit plans are governed by the OKO (a state law)—no matter how frequently ERISA is referred to in an employer’s benefit plan and regardless of whether ERISA applies to other aspects of that benefit plan.

The Cavazos case was the first real opportunity we had to see whether removal of such claims to the federal courts was possible. Then, in September, Judge Stephen Friot (from the same Western District Court of Oklahoma) followed Heaton’s logic in Vasquez v. Dillards, our second opportunity to see whether federal court involvement in the OKO claims process was available. The decision read:

“The court concludes that the [Oklahoma Employee Injury Benefit Act] is part of Oklahoma’s statutory scheme governing occupational injuries and workplace liability; in other words, the OEIBA is part of Oklahoma’s statutory scheme governing workmen’s compensation.”

The case before Judge Friot was a bit different procedurally, but it came to the same result. In the Vasquez case, the employee received an adverse decision from her employer regarding her claim for benefits under the employer’s OKO plan. She then sought review by the OWCC as provided for in the Oklahoma statute. The employer removed the case to federal court, contending that the company’s plan was governed by ERISA and, therefore, that ERISA pre-empted state law on the issue and that the federal court had exclusive jurisdiction. The employee moved to remand the case to the OWCC. Judge Friot sided with the employee and remanded the case, which was to be expected post-Cavazos. The ruling in Vasquez (which features a more detailed discussion than the one provided by Judge Heaton in Cavazos) concludes that 28 USC §1445(c) (the same jurisdictional statute relied upon by Judge Heaton) barred removal of the case to the federal court, even if, as Judge Friot specifically presumed for purposes of his ruling, the “plan under which [the employee files] claims may be … an ERISA plan.”

The explicit—and antiquated—language from the 1974 ERISA law indicates that ERISA doesn’t apply to “workmen’s compensation.” ERISA’s authors recognized a long tradition of federal deference to individual states on workers’ compensation issues. While the OKO is different from traditional workers’ compensation, in the only cases known to address the issue thus far, the federal court system has concluded that it cannot exercise jurisdiction over the on-the-job injury claims of OKO employees.

Die-hard ERISA champions, as it turns out, can cling just as stubbornly to obsolete ideas as can workers’ compensation stakeholders. But OKO supporters don’t need to win such folks over; the law is already on the side of progress. The OKO clearly seeks to stand on its own, and it doesn’t want ERISA as a crutch. Being free from ERISA has advantages beyond tax implications. The OKO clearly sits much closer to traditional workers’ compensation than does TXNS—and, as such, OKO may be regularly accepted as a replacement in the state’s important oil and gas industry. In both Texas and Oklahoma, the larger energy companies almost always require traditional workers’ comp to be held by contracted companies. That won’t change in Texas, but it very well could in Oklahoma. Moreover, these federal court orders should provide solace to the Sooner State because they suggest the oversight and development of this new creation will be the responsibility of Oklahomans.[3]

[1] See “Inside Corporate America’s Campaign to Ditch Workers’ Comp,” an installment in the Insult to Injury series.

[2] The court remanded the case just two days after it was removed without seeking briefs from either party.

[3] To date, all three branches of the Oklahoma state government have actively or tacitly supported the OKO. At worst, the state has adopted a wait-and-see approach to this new alternative. At best, Oklahomans—sans attorneys—are eager to discover whether the incredibly promising early gains made possible through the OKO are sustainable over the long term.

At WorkersCompensationOptions.com, we’re convinced the gains are sustainable. There’s nothing theoretical about our promise of delivering superior care to employees at reduced costs to employers. We’re already doing it in Oklahoma, and we at WCO are proud to be part of this long overdue transformation.

The Biggest Medicare Fraud Cases of 2015

Medicare does not keep records of how much it loses annually because of fraud, but the FBI, which oversees the investigation and prosecution of those alleged to have participated in fraud, estimates that 3% to 10% of all Medicare billings are fraudulent. The FBI task force believes that healthcare fraud costs taxpayers “tens of billions of dollars a year.”

Here is an overview of some of the biggest Medicare fraud cases of 2015:

  1. In June 2015, 243 healthcare providers across the country were charged individually with Medicare fraud. This was the largest-ever coordinated takedown in the history of the National Medicare Fraud Strike Force history. Doctors, nurses, pharmacists, home health workers and other healthcare professionals were all indicted for falsely billing Medicare for approximately $712 million in various fraudulent schemes. The healthcare providers allegedly:
  • Billed for services that were not rendered
  • Charged for equipment that was never delivered
  • Billed for care that was not needed

Specific criminal charges include:

  • Conspiracy to commit healthcare fraud
  • Violating anti-kickback statutes
  • Money laundering
  • Identity theft

Healthcare providers nationally were included in the sweep of the task force. Charges were brought in Texas, Louisiana, Florida, California, New York and elsewhere. The defendants face years in prison in addition to having their assets forfeited to the government and having to repay the amount of money they fraudulently obtained.

In a press release announcing the takedown, the attorney general for the U.S. expressed the commitment of the Department of Justice to continue its “focus on preventing wrongdoing and prosecuting those whose criminal activity drives up medical costs and jeopardizes a system that our citizens trust with their lives.”

  1. Also in June 2015, the former president of a Houston hospital was sentenced to more than 40 years in federal prison and ordered to pay $46.8 million in restitution to Medicare. His son and two other co-conspirators were also found guilty of receiving kickbacks, conspiracy to commit Medicare fraud and money laundering. The scheme involved billing Medicare for psychiatric services that were never provided to patients. The total amount of money fraudulently received by all participants was estimated to equal $158 million.
  1. In October 2015, Millennium Health in Boston, formerly Millennium Laboratories, admitted to billing Medicare and other governmental healthcare programs more than $256 million for laboratory tests that were either unnecessary or never actually performed. The lab also provided kickbacks to physicians for referring patients for testing. Millennium, with headquarters in San Diego, is one of the largest urine-testing laboratories in the U.S. According to the Massachusetts U.S. attorney, “Millennium promoted indiscriminate and unnecessary testing that increased medical costs without serving patients’ real medical needs. A laboratory which knowingly conducts medically unnecessary testing operates unlawfully and squanders our precious federal health care resources.”
  1. In August 2015, a New York man who operated several healthcare clinics for treating HIV/AIDS patients was sentenced to more than seven years in federal prison for defrauding Medicare out of more than $31 million. He billed for treatment that patients did not need and often were not given. Medicare was billed for infusion or IV treatment for many patients who never received treatment. Some patients who were provided infusion therapy were administered doses that were highly diluted.
  1. Two psychologists were recently added to an indictment to join two of their cohorts who had previously been charged with defrauding Medicare of more than $25 million. The psychologists are owners of two companies that provide psychological testing to nursing home patients in four Gulf Coast states: Alabama, Florida, Louisiana and Mississippi. The problem is that the psychologists allegedly billed Medicare for tests that were not medically necessary and, in many cases, were never performed. The case is pending, and the press release notes that the defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty.

The Medicare Fraud Strike Force, since its formation in March 2007, has charged 2,300 defendants with fraudulently billing more than a total of $7 billion. The task force is committed to continuing its work to hold providers accountable so that the number of fraudulent providers will decrease.

Why Independence Matters for Claims

Policyholders insure against business risks to protect their financial integrity. When these risks become a reality, claim recovery is the return on investment. Unfortunately, it’s not quite that easy. Claim recovery is a process that requires expertise to secure a fair settlement. As you know, your carrier has experts assigned to adjust and audit your claim, so, in turn, you should have experts to help you quantify your losses and prepare a well-documented claim. But expertise is not enough. If you want the best chance to be made whole, independence matters.

Many companies promote themselves as focused on client needs, but, in claim preparation, it has to be more than a slogan. When it comes to preparing claims, true independence isn’t as common as you might think.

Is your loss accountant independent? The most common claim preparers are forensic accountants. Let’s take a look at where they exist in the insurance industry:

  • Insurance company forensic accountants
  • Insurance broker forensic accountants
  • Consulting firms with forensic accounting service offering
  • Accounting firms with forensic accounting service offering
  • Independent loss accounting firms

It should go without saying that the firms that are hired by the insurance companies cannot provide independent and unbiased service to policyholders, but many still do rely on the insurers’ accountants to measure their losses. If asked, the insurers’ accountants would likely recommend the insured retain an independent firm to assist them, yet there are those who don’t know and don’t ask. For the policyholders in this category, I hope you see the light after reading this article.

Broker-owned accounting firms have their own set of potential conflicts, starting with the strategic relationship they have with insurance companies. As a former broker, I can tell you these relationships are sacred. The carrier’s profitability is directly related to claims paid, and the carrier will reward brokers for profitable accounts with a bonus commission, aka contingent commissions. If you are on a fixed-fee arrangement, it does not mean there’s no contingent commission in play. Your broker wants to serve your needs and will work hard for you, but, when you have a loss, the broker has a conflict of interest.

It’s also important to remember that your claim can last longer than your broker agreement. It’s hard enough to end a relationship with your broker, but if the broker is preparing an outstanding claim it will prolong your dealings with the broker. If you change carriers and your broker at the same time, the situation can be harder to resolve. If you are using your broker for claim preparation, consider an independent option that only serves one master, you.

The large accounting firms with consulting practices will scale back their consulting activities when faced with financial debacles that cause regulators to scrutinize their independence. The inherent conflict of an auditing firm preparing a claim for a client should be obvious. The audit firm will have a direct impact on creating an asset or revenue stream, which the firm would then audit as part of the financial results. Those two activities need to remain separate to maintain independence.

Also consider what it means if your claim preparation firm is also the auditor for your insurer. As you can see, there are potential conflicts on both sides. Why not avoid potential conflicts and work with an independent specialist?

Hiring consulting firms presents similar conflicts to consider. Is it a provider of another service to your company? Does it also serve your carrier in some capacity? Making this determination can be time-consuming, and conflicts can be easily missed. Any firm you consider should be clear about possible conflicts, but it’s your recovery at stake, so it’s best to do the proper vetting.

In the insurance industry, it’s the policyholders’ right and obligation to value their own losses for submission to their insurer. Your insurer may be more than willing to help, but is that’s what is best for your business? Claim recovery is the reason policyholders invest in insurance, so be sure to hire a firm that knows how to prepare a claim and is working on your behalf. Loss accounting is a specialized craft that comes as a result of experience and expertise with insurance claims. Seeking an independent, third-party valuation of your losses is not only smart business but may be a fiduciary responsibility, especially with a large property and business interruption claim.