Tag Archives: kathryn messer

Biometrics and Fraud Prevention: Seeing Eye to Eye

As more consumers opt for the flexibility of serving themselves, it has become essential for businesses to deploy strong systems to authenticate identity. The challenge is how to reduce fraud without frustrating consumers or compromising the customer experience.

Biometric technology has been seen increasingly as a solution in industries such as financial services, but is there a useful place in insurance? As technology becomes more convenient –and more secure — many are saying yes.

What’s What in Biometrics

By identifying individuals through their unique physiological or behavioral patterns, biometrics offers a higher level of security, ensuring that only authorized persons have access to sensitive data. Physiological biometrics include fingerprint, face, iris and hand geometry recognition. Behavioral biometrics identify signature and voice verification, including keystroke kinetics that identify a person’s typing habits.

As consumer-centric channels such as mobile and online applications continue to expand, so will the risk of fraud. And while many industries, including insurance, continue to deploy new technologies to stave off attacks, the reality is that the tools and methods by which professional fraudsters operate are becoming increasingly sophisticated.

“While insurers have applied some preventive measures against fraud, the industry as a whole needs to catch up,” says Steve Cook, director of business development, Facebanx. “They must be forward-thinking and recognize the benefits of biometric technology and how it can help in preventing fraudulent activities.”

Reducing Claim Fraud and Protecting Data

One area where biometrics has begun to take hold is healthcare insurance. A study by the Ponemon Institute found nearly 1.5 million Americans to be victims of medical identity theft. Healthcare fraud is estimated to cost between $70 billion and $255 billion a year, accounting for as much as 10% of total U.S. healthcare costs.

Many insurers are using biometrics to help reduce billing fraud by eliminating the sharing of medical insurance cards between patients, or by making it more difficult for a person to assume another’s identity. For example, as an alternative to paper insurance cards, a biometric iris scan can immediately transport proof of a patient’s physical presence at a healthcare facility.

Biometric technology is also assisting healthcare insurers with compliance and data integrity standards — in particular with those set by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). For example, in addition to adhering to requirements for automatic logoff and user identification, insurers must implement additional safeguards that include PINs, passwords and some method of biometrics.

Fraud Capabilities in Property and Casualty

According to a report by Aite Group, the war against fraud in property and casualty insurance is also escalating. The group estimates that claim fraud in the U.S. P&C industry alone cost carriers $64 billion in 2012 and will reach $80 billion by 2015. Customer contact centers have been hit particularly hard. While the focus on protecting consumer data has primarily centered on online channels, fraudsters are now targeting the phone channel, as well. Leveraging information obtained through social media networks, thieves are manipulating call center representatives and gathering customer information. 

For this reason, biometrics are being deployed. Representatives can cross-reference incoming calls against a watch list of known fraudsters, identifying unique voice prints. Advanced biometric techniques can also identify fraud patterns based on speech analytics, talk patterns and various “red flag” interactions.

Summary

The insurance industry is just beginning to scratch the surface when it comes to identifying areas of fraud management to which biometric science can be applied. 

“Insurance companies [that] are first to adopt this kind of technology will push the fraudsters over to the competition, because fraudsters don’t want their face or voice on a database that they can’t control,” Cook says.

Making the switch to biometric security measures can mean a substantial investment if done on a large scale. Even so, with the proliferation of online channels, consumer conveniences and ever-shifting tactics of fraudsters, deploying some degree of biometric technology will become a competitive necessity. And, as long as the insurance industry continues to expand consumer services because of e-commerce and m-commerce, no doubt new applications of biometrics will come about.

Life Waiver of Premium Part 2: Optimizing Claim Management Operations

This is Part 2 of a two-part series on waiver of premium. Part 1 can be found here.

Recognizing the need to improve claim management processes in waiver of premium claims, life insurers are turning to technology to replace inefficient operations associated with manual claim processing.

“Insurers today have an opportunity to bring automation into the life waiver of premium adjudication process to improve existing business models,” says Eric Lester, vice president of administrative services at Legal & General America. “It’s about operational efficiency, providing a good consumer experience, and integrating forward-looking solutions that fit the profile [that] business models in the industry should emulate. This is why we’re thinking forward—strategizing as how to integrate these efficiencies into everyday processes.”

Insurers can streamline the claim adjudication process by standardizing procedures to substantially reduce manual claim handling and support lowered risk management outcomes.  This next level of technology not only yields greater improvements in life waiver claim management but also enables insurers to focus on the effectiveness of their claim decisions.

Scope of the Problem

For benefit specialists to effectively manage claims and provide highly personalized results requires access to relevant medical data from multiple sources.  Life waiver claim management requires collecting, collating, and communicating the claimant’s medical notes and pre-disability occupation data to evaluate their current capabilities, restrictions and limitations. The information derived during the initial assessment stage builds a critical foundation for ensuring consistency not only in the initial claim interpretation but in the recertification process, as well.

The handling of restrictions  and limitation (R&L) data, occupational identification information, and policy definitions  continue to follow more traditional manual processing procedures, resulting in claims frequently adjudicated without the required data, or against underwritten policy definitions. Here is what’s happening with manual processing:

manual processing

Insurers rely heavily on the Attending Physician Statement (APS) forms to collect medical status data. However, considering the high volume of claims per specialist and the time involved to manually process them, information contained in the APS isn’t always fully translated. Because of this, forms are often lacking the complete information required to fully understand the claim, based on a fair and accurate assessment of the claimant’s physical capabilities, restrictions and limitations. Moreover, this manual process makes it hard to ensure consistency throughout the duration of the claim.

For example, if the physician states that the claimant is unable to work and fails to provide a written medical basis in the APS forms regarding the decision, benefit specialists are unable to accurately assess and match the claim to the appropriate contractual definition of disability as defined in the claimant’s policy. This process makes it difficult to determine if the liability should be accepted or denied.

Managing the risk throughout the duration of the claim can influence claim outcomes by providing the opportunity for better claim management for both the insurer and the claimant.

The Long-Term Disability & Life Waiver Chokehold

It is not uncommon for consumers to have both their long-term disability (LTD) and life insurance with the same insurance carrier. So, when a person goes on disability, there are essentially two claims open and running simultaneously. The problem is the life waiver claims aren’t being treated as disability claims—which is, in reality, what they are.

What typically happens is the LTD claim becomes the driving force while the life waiver claim takes a backseat, often translating into processing delays. Even though these plans usually reflect two very distinct definitions (LTD claims begin as a two-year “own occupation” plan, while life waiver is usually “any occupation” provision from day one), the life waiver claim sits—waiting to see what the LTD claim is going to do first.  The life waiver claim essentially becomes more of a contractual definition of secondary importance, and consequently is managed as such.

Insurance carriers must be diligent in applying adjudication decisions consistent with what is underwritten in the life waiver provisions of an insured’s policy, and not based on what’s happening with the LTD claim. This has become increasingly problematic as caseloads continue to grow and life waiver claims follow the LTD claim by default, increasing the insurer’s reserve liabilities (i.e., disability life reserves, morality life reserves and premium reimbursement liabilities), and risk exposure.

Unfortunately, once a disability has been accepted on a life waiver claim, there tends to be minimal risk management. Improved risk management in life waiver claims should include best practices that focus on understanding the severity, restrictions and limitations of the claimant, then matching claimant capabilities to the occupational policy terms.

Better Claim Monitoring, Better Results

What’s missing within life waiver processes is the ability to manage the claim block holistically with information derived from all necessary sources, and integrating it into a unified data platform. By doing this, insurers can quickly identify claimants that have occupational opportunities based on their specific physical capabilities, restrictions and limitations, education, experience, and training. But it doesn’t stop there.

Once an occupational opportunity has been determined, insurers can compare these findings to occupations identified by the department of labor and match the capabilities of the claimant to a specific occupation. In addition, medical details surrounding the claim should be updated continually and combined with historical data, as physical capabilities can change over the duration of the claim. This type of automated vocational support allows adjusters to fully evaluate the claimant’s condition for available occupation opportunities.

Considering the thousands of claims that are processed manually by examiners, it can be difficult to ensure that new claims and the recertification of claims are being completed on time, consistently, and in line with risk management best practices. This becomes an almost unmanageable task for examiners as they struggle to maintain the continuity required to reopen, examine, and research individual claims from day one. It is a continual problem because a claim that is approved today may look completely different a year from now.

“With technology, there is a great opportunity for insurers to make operational changes that will systematically improve their current adjudication processes and minimize the insurer’s reserve liabilities,” explains Thomas Capato, CEO of FastTrack RTW Services & Solutions, whose Life Waiver Tool is the first commercially available technology to automate the waiver of premium process. “This next-generation best practice will not only help improve internal productivity for life insurers but allow waiver reserves to be managed properly and improve future actuarial assumptions.”

An automated claim process allows for continual claim management and tracking that’s set to the claimant’s policy terms, ensuring that all follow-ups are done in a timely and consistent manner — without the need for manual intervention.

Summary

Every claim has unique situations, and insurers need to apply the right risk management principles to that particular claim. This can mean the addition of a single automated application, or perhaps a combination of many, internalizing processes to determine the best solution for enhancing risk management outcomes.

“Technology enhances the ability to fully capture specific information surrounding the nature of a claimant’s disability for better risk management within the life waiver block, providing insurers with an accurate profile of the person, the job, and occupational capabilities,” says Lester, at Legal & General America.

It’s time for life waiver processes to utilize technology to manage claims in a more efficient, effective, and standardized manner. By replacing manual claim tasks with the rigor of automated monitoring, insurers have the opportunity to optimize existing processes and improve overall operational efficiencies within their life waiver claim block. Moreover, it is this technology that can make consistent, supportable and repeatable real-time decisions, bringing value to both the insurer and the claimant.

Waiver Of Premium: The Unmanaged Liability

This is Part 1 of a two-part series on waiver of premium. Part 2 can be found here.

Insurance actuaries consider waiver of premium (WOP) a neglected liability — a supplemental benefit rider that has yet to be fully evaluated for risk exposure or cost containment, unknowingly costing individual and group life insurance carriers billions in liability every year.

The problem is that many companies don't have accurate claim management systems capable of reporting what's really happening with the life waiver reserves that are sitting on their books. But with a 44 percent increase in disability claims by people formerly in the workplace1, it's time this largely ignored liability is held up to the light.

Why Companies Need To Pay Attention
Most life insurers aren't fully aware of how much of a liability they're carrying when it comes to their waiver of premium reserves. Moreover, they're even less likely to know critical information such as the number of open life waiver claims, the percentage of approvals and denials, or claims still holding reserves that perhaps maxed out years ago.

Tom Penn-David, Principal of the actuarial consulting firm Ant Re, LLC explains: “There are generally two components to life waiver reserves. The first is active life reserves (for individual insurers only) and the second is disabled life reserves, which is by far the larger of the two. A company that has as few as 1,000 open waiver claims with a face value of $100,000 per policy, may be reserving $25+ million on their balance sheet, depending on the age and terms of the benefits. This is a significant figure when coupled with the fact that many life insurers do not appear to be enforcing their contract provisions and have a higher than necessary claim load. Reserve reductions are both likely and substantial if the proper management systems are in place.”

Unfortunately, by not knowing what's broken the situation can't be fixed. Companies need to examine their numbers in order to recognize the level of reserve liability they're carrying, and to see for themselves the significant financial and operational consequences of not paying attention. Furthermore, a company's senior financial management team may be underestimating the actual number of their block of waiver claims, thus downplaying the potential for savings in this area. Typically, the block of existing claims is much larger than new claims added in any given year, and often represents the largest portion of overall liability.

“Life companies are primarily focused on life insurance reserves and not carefully looking at waiver of premium,” Oscar Scofield of Factor Re Services U.S. and former CEO of Scottish Re., says. “There could be a significant reserve redundancy or deficiency in disabled life reserves and companies need to pay attention to recognize the impact this has on their bottom line.”

To illustrate this point, let's take a quick look at the financial possibilities for a company with even a small block of life waiver claims:

Example – Individual Life Carrier Current Reserve Snapshot With Proactive Management
Number of Open WOP Claims 1,000 1,000
(*) Average Disability Life Reserves (DLR) $19,989,255 $19,989,255
(*) Average Mortality Reserves $3,046,722 $3,046,722
Average Premiums Paid by Carrier on Approved WOP Claims $754,427 $754,427
Average Total Reserve Liabilities $23,790,404 $23,790,404
Claim Approval Percentage 90% 60%
Reserves Based on Approval Percentage $21,411,364 $14,274,242
Potential Reserve Savings $7,137,121

* The above reserve data is based on Statutory Annual Statements.

As you can see, even under the most conservative scenarios, the reserve savings are substantial when a proactive waiver of premium claim management process is put into action.

Industry Challenges
The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) requires life companies to report financials that include both the number of policyholders who aren't disabled with life waiver, as well as reserves for those who are currently disabled and utilizing their life waiver benefits. But many items, like the number of new claims or the amount of benefit cost are not reported. Moreover, companies rarely move beyond these life waiver reporting touch-points to effectively monitor their life waiver claim management processes or to identify the impact of contract definitions on their claim costs.

The new and ongoing volume of claim information, manual processing, and the fact that life waiver claims involve months if not years of consistent, close monitoring, is humanly challenging — if not impossible. For example, it's not out of the ordinary to have only a few people assigned to process literally thousands of life waiver claims.

It's unfortunate, but this type of manual claim reporting continues to remain unchanged as claim personnel (working primarily off of three main documents: the attending physician's statement, the employee statement, and the claim form), quickly push claims through the system. The process is such that once these documents are reviewed (and unless there are any questionable red flags), the claim continues to be viewed as eligible, is paid, and then set-up for review another 12-months down the road. As long as the requests continue to come in and the attending physician still classifies the claimant as disabled and incapable of working, there isn't much done to proactively manage and advance the claim investigation.

An equally challenging part of the life waiver claim process is working off the attending physician statement — both when claims are initially processed, as well as when they are recertified. Typically very generic in nature, the statement often only indicates whether or not the claimant is or continues to be unable to work. This problematic approach essentially permits the physician to drive the course of the claim decision away from the management of the insurance company. The insurer, who is now having to rely on the physician's report to fully understand and evaluate the scope of the claimant's medical condition, has little information in which to manage the risk.

For example, did the evaluation accurately assess the claimant's ability to work infrequently or not at all? Are they able to sit, stand, walk, lift, or drive? If so, then what are the specific measurable limitations? Is there potential to transition them back into their previous occupation or into an occupation that requires sedentary or light duty — either now or in the near future? In order for companies to move beyond the face value of what has initially been reported, and to monitor where the claimant is in the process, they need to build better business models.

Closing The Technology Gap
The insurance industry as a whole has always been a slow responder when it comes to technology. But for companies to optimize profitability, closing the gaps in life waiver claim management and operational inefficiencies will require a combination of technology and human intervention. Investing in the right blend of people, processes, and technology with real-time capabilities, can substantially reduce block loads and improve overall risk results.

Constructing a well-defined business model to apply standardized best practices that can support and monitor life waiver claims is critical. The adjudication process must move beyond obvious “low hanging fruit” to consistently evaluate the life of the claim holistically. It means not only examining open claim blocks, but also those that are closed, to better identify learning and coaching opportunities to improve future claim outcomes.

Additionally, segmentation can provide great insight into specific areas within the block, by applying predictive modeling techniques. It can evaluate how claims were originally assessed, the estimated duration, and why a claim has been extended. For example, was there something regarding the claim that occurred to warrant the extension of benefits such as change in diagnosis?

Predictive modeling also looks at how certain diagnoses are trending within the life waiver block, so if anything stands out regarding potential occupational training opportunities, benefit specialists can effectively introduce the appropriate vocational resources at the right time for the insured.

Capabilities to improve outcomes in waiver of premium operations through technology and automation should include these three primary assessments:

  • Financial: Companies need to start looking at waiver of premium differently. They need to continually evaluate the declining profit margins on in-force reserves in order to identify the impact on profits. Even if a waiver of premium reserve block is somewhere between 10 and 200 million dollars, potential savings are likely to be 10 to 20%. Better risk management tools can substantially control internal costs and improve reserve balances.
  • Operational: Current business models have to move beyond the manual process to steer the claim down the right path from start until liability determination. Standardized automation brings together fragmented, disparate information systematically across multiple platforms, essentially unifying communications between the attending physician and the insurance company. This well-managed infrastructure gathers, updates, and integrates relevant data throughout the life of the claim.
  • Availability: A critical way to improve the life waiver claim process is through accurate reporting. By breaking down the silos between the attending physician, case manager, and the insurance company, claim related information can immediately be uploaded and reported in real-time. Proactively enhancing the risk management process to enable companies to consistently receive updated claimant health evaluation and physical limitation reports, is critical for best determining return-to-work employment opportunities.

Three Technology Touch-Points in Waiver of Premium Operations

Front end: Assessment of the initial claim and determining the best possible duration time.

Mid-point: An open claim should be reassessed to determine continued eligibility and to evaluate the direction of the claim if lasting longer than projected-and why.

End-point: The evaluation process continues to ensure claims are being re-evaluated at regular intervals, examining the possibility of getting the claimant back to work.

Why Waiver Of Premium Matters
What's typically happening is that most company's life claim blocks are managed on the same platform and in the same manner as their life claims, so ultimately the life waiver block is improperly managed. Life companies need to recognize that a waiver of premium block is not a life block but a disability block, and needs to be managed differently. For example, older actuarial tables do not reflect the fact that people with disabilities are living longer, potentially leaving companies with under-stated reserve liabilities.

Ultimately, having a good handle on the life waiver block will prove beneficial for both the carrier and the insured.

Part 2 of this series will discuss specifically how the introduction of process and technology into this manual and asynchronous area can deliver substantial benefits to life carriers.

1 Social Security Administration, April 2013.