Tag Archives: john draper

Social Media and Suicide Prevention

In 2017, a 15-year-old girl from Bedford, PA, was trying to live an ordinary teenage life until her classmates began bullying her. They attacked her on social media sites like Facebook and Kik about her red hair and braces, some going as far as telling her that she should kill herself. Her mother remembers finding the young girl sobbing for hours because of what people were saying about her in school and online. Even though her mother took her phone and tried to comfort the girl, less than a week later she would die by suicide.

While the rate of death by suicide among teenage girls is at an all-time high, they’re not the highest risk demographic of the more than 40,000 people who die by suicide in the U.S. each year. According to the CDC, seven of 10 suicides in 2015 were men, making men 3.5x more likely than women to die by suicide. Now the third-leading cause of death among adults age 15-44 worldwide, the global rate of suicide will hit 1.53 million per year by 2020, which constitutes one death by suicide every 20 seconds, according to the World Health Organization.

Children as young as 11 are dying by suicide as a result of experiences on social media, and we know of at least three examples of children broadcasting their own death to live audiences using social media tools such as Facebook live, Twitter and YouTube.

How are leaders responding?

In response to these disturbing trends, Facebook has partnered with organizations like the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline to develop a set of tools intended to help individuals find resources and support who are considered “at risk” for self-harm.

The first of these tools is a new suicide-prevention feature on Facebook that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to identify posts indicating suicidal or harmful thoughts. The AI scans the posts and their associated comments, compares them with others that merited intervention and, in some cases, passes them along to its community team for review. The company plans to reach out to users it believes are at risk, showing them a screen with suicide-prevention resources including options to contact a helpline or contact a friend.

While in some cases the artificial intelligence software will notify the Facebook community if it flags a situation as “very likely urgent,” in most cases it will simply work in the background to offer messaging and advice to the friends and family of a person in need.

See also: Blueprint for Suicide Prevention  

Dr. John Draper, of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, said that he feels that the software sounds promising. “If a person is in the process of hurting themselves and this is a way to get to them faster, all the better,” he told BuzzFeed News. “In suicide prevention, sometimes timing is everything.”

Facebook is also making certain suicide prevention organizations available via Facebook Messenger, its instant messaging app. Facebook users will be able to flag posts that they feel indicate “at risk behavior,” which Facebook will respond to with an on-screen option to receive suicide-prevention resources.

Can we use social media to predict suicide?

New research out of Korea suggests that we might be able to begin using social media to predict suicidal behavior.

The three-year study looks at the social and environmental factors that contribute to suicidal behavior and describes correlations between public mood and suicide and how data from social media sources and weblogs (blogs) might be used to predict that behavior; their primary hypothesis being that social media variables are meaningfully associated with nationwide suicide numbers.

At the end of the study, the research team concluded that, “We found a significant association of social media data with national suicide rate, resulting in a robust, proof-of-principle predictive model,” and the team suggests social media data be used in future predictive modeling.

How suicide prevention advocates are using social media.

Sites like the Suicide Prevention Coalition of Colorado, the Mighty and To Write Love on Her Arms are also using social media to engage audiences with messages of help and hope.

The Suicide Prevention Coalition of Colorado, an organization of which the author of this article is a member, uses Facebook, Twitter and email newsletters as educational and communications tools to promote events, raise awareness of mental health legislation and bridge the gap between service providers across the state of Colorado that might not have the resources they need as solo practitioners.

To Write Love On Her Arms (TWLOHA) is a site that offers hope and help to those struggling with depression, addiction, self-injury and suicide.

With a Facebook following of more than 1.5 million and a Twitter following of nearly 300,000, they share individual stories of hope and recovery and work to destigmatize suicide and self-harm.

The Mighty is a blog with more than 5,000 contributors and 150 million readers that also gives people suffering from mental health disabilities a place to find resources, encouragement and support.

This site, like TWLOHA, focuses on shared experiences. Individuals struggling with disability, disease and mental illness write in and share their stories of hope and recovery.

Bell Canada, a telephone company in Canada, is running a “Let’s Talk” campaign dedicated to raising $100 million for mental health programs by 2020 and encouraging people to find the strength to come out and talk to someone if they find themselves struggling with thoughts of self-harm.

See also: 6 Things to Do to Prevent Suicides  

What you can do to get involved today.

Twitter is a wonderful conversation tool where you can do a search for keywords like #SuicidePrevention and become a part of the conversation with leaders, educators, individuals struggling and those with experience. A continued effort to destigmatize mental health issues helps those struggling realize that there is help.

You can use social media to interact with your legislature. Most politicians today are active on social media, and some even have live events on social media, giving us the opportunity to ask them where they stand on issues such as mental healthcare as well as share our opinions on the issues.

You can share resources on social media, especially around the death of a celebrity, to help further the conversation online and help someone find resources who might not have the strength to ask for help.

Finally, if you or anyone you know is struggling with thoughts of suicide and need to talk to someone right away, reach out to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or visit online at http://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/talk-to-someone-now/.

If you need support for suicide grief or suicidal thoughts but are not in crisis, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline offers resources on how to help either yourself or a loved one.

Stand Up for Robin Williams. . .

On Monday, Aug. 11, 2014, we lost Robin Williams. He was a brilliant actor and comic…a man most of us grew up with. We knew him as a funny guy, an alien, a genie, a nanny, an inspirational teacher and so much more. We also knew he struggled with depression, addiction and possibly bipolar disorder.

Collectively, we grieve for his loss. Williams had an uncanny ability to make us smile. Even when playing more dramatic roles, he brought light, laughter and inspiration to our lives.

We grieve, too, for thousands of other people who have died by suicide. Fathers, mothers, sisters, daughters, sons, brothers…suicide isn’t just about the person who dies. Its painful ripples spread far and wide, affecting every one of us.

We believe every suicide death is preventable, that not another person should die in desperation and alone. Those with behavioral health challenges like major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia have suicide rates 10 to 15 times greater than the general population. Yet, millions survive, and many find a way to thrive. Recovery is possible!

The bitter irony of Williams’ death was the support he gave for another disease that takes lives: cancer. Williams was a strong backer of St. Jude’s Research Center and Stand Up to Cancer. He would visit cancer patients, sometimes in their own homes, bringing joy into lives that would invariably be cut short, just as Williams’ was.

The cancer prevention movement has been so effective in getting people involved – in prevention, in fundraising, in advocacy.  Now many people – whether or not they’ve been directly affected by cancer – Stand Up in solidarity to help fight the battle. They stand shoulder to shoulder with people who are fighting for their lives? They stand to honor those who’ve passed with dignity. They got people like Robin Williams to lean in, and say, “I care. What can I do to help?”

The suicide prevention movement can learn a lot from the successes of the cancer prevention movement.

How has the cancer prevention movement achieved its goals? It advanced science and promoted stories of hope and recovery. Those who want to stand up for suicide prevention can do this, too.

As Dr. Sean Maguire in the movie “Good Will Hunting,” Williams counsels Matt Damon’s Will Hunting on life, love and grief before telling him, “Your move, chief.”

Now it’s our move. Let’s honor Williams’ memory, and that of every person who has died by suicide, by making suicide a thing of the past.  What can you do to Stand Up for suicide prevention?

  • Reach out and ask others who may be going through difficult life challenges, “Are you okay? What can I do to support you?” Let them know they are not alone and that you can help them link to resources.
  • Promote the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (800-273-8255) everywhere – schools, workplaces, faith communities, neighborhoods.
  • Volunteer and participate in suicide prevention work like community walks, town hall meetings, crisis line support and more.
  • Donate to suicide prevention organizations.
  • Learn about the real facts about suicide and the strategies that have been shown to prevent it.
  • Then bring others into the circle – your healthcare providers, your employer, your educators and so on. Elevate the conversation and make suicide prevention a health and safety priority.
  • Ask your healthcare plan and provider to join you.

As a society, we’ve stood up for so many other important things. It’s time for us to stand up to suicide.

When we all stand up and move together, we create a movement. Together, our voices can create significant change in systems, in policy, in funding and in the general view of suicide. We can restore dignity and offer hope and empowerment and save lives.

This article was written by Sally Spencer-Thomas with four other members of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention:

  • David Covington, LPC, MBA, Recovery Innovations and Zero Suicide Advisory Group
  • John Draper, National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and The Way Forward Suicide Attempt Survivors Task Force
  • Mike Hogan, Hogan Health Services and Zero Suicide Advisory Group
  • Eduardo Vega, Mental Health Association of San Francisco and The Way Forward Suicide Attempt Survivors Task Force

#standup2suicide #zerosuicide #wayforward