Tag Archives: Javier baixas

A New World Full of Opportunity

The primary drivers of disruption in insurance – notably, fintech (and more specifically, insurtech) – are coming from outside the industry. However, while the pace of change and market disruption has been daunting for most incumbents, the growing presence of insurtech companies is not a threat, but rather is creating real opportunities for the industry.

We see a combination of market and organizational priorities that open the door for these new opportunities.

  • External opportunities primarily relate to social and technological trends and pertain to the shift in customer needs and expectations (which digital technology has facilitated). Insurers have been taking action in these areas to stay relevant in the market and at least maintain their market position. For many companies, focusing on these opportunities remains critical, but this is not enough for them to gain a truly competitive advantage.
  • Internal opportunities relate to using technology to enhance operations and business function execution. For example, some insurers have used artificial intelligence (AI) technology to enhance internal operations, which has improved efficiencies and automated existing customer-facing, underwriting and claims processes.

To take full advantage of these opportunities, insurers need to determine their innovation needs and make meaningful connections with innovators. Doing so will help them balance their innovation mix – in other words, where they can make incremental innovations (the ones that keep them in the game) and where they can strive for real breakthroughs with disruptive and radical innovation (the ones that position them as market leaders).

An effective enterprise innovation model (EIM) will take into account the different ways to meet an organization’s various needs and help it make innovative breakthroughs. The model or combination of models that is most suitable for an organization will depend on its innovation appetite, the type of partnerships it desires and the capabilities it needs. EIMs feature three primary approaches to support corporate strategy:

  • Partner – Innovation centers (also known as hubs or labs) are the most common of the three EIM approaches. Their main purpose is to connect insurers to the InsurTech ecosystem and create new channels for bringing an outside-in view of innovation to the business units.
  • Build – Incubators are a common and effective way to build innovative capabilities and accelerate change. They can be internal, but most companies have preferred to establish them externally and then bring their ideas back into the company.
  • Buy – In this case, an insurer typically will establish a strategic corporate ventures division that sources ideas from outside the company. The company provides funding and support for equity, while the venture explores, identifies and evaluates solutions, and participates in new ventures.

Companies can select elements from each of the above models based on their need for external innovation, the availability of talent, their ability to execute and the amount of investment the organization is willing to commit.

See also: Innovation — or Just Innovative Thinking?  

Insurance leaders’ innovation agenda should include:

  • Scenario planning – What are potential future scenarios and their implications?
  • Real-time monitoring and analysis of the insurtech landscape – What’s out there that can help us now, and what do we want that may not exist yet?
  • Determining how to promote enterprise innovation, including which combination of approaches will most effectively accelerate and enable execution – What’s the best approach for us to stimulate and take advantage of innovation?
  • Augmenting the organization with new and different types of talent – Where are the innovators we need, and how can we best attract and employ them?
  • Cyber security and regulation – Are we prepared for the operational challenges that new technology can present, and have we and our real and potential partners considered the compliance ramifications of what we’re doing or considering?

Typical Exploration Topics

Some of the typical exploration topics across lines of business are:

  • Personal lines: usage-based insurance, shared and on-demand economies, peer-to-peer, direct-to-consumer, ADAS & autonomous cars.
  • Commercial lines: direct to small business, drones and satellite imagery, internet of things, alternative risk transfer, emerging risks.
  • Life and retirement: robo-advice, personalized insurance, medical advances, automated underwriting, decreasing morbidity and mortality risk.

Opportunities for insurers

As part of PwC’s Future of Insurance initiative, we have interviewed many industry executives and identified six key insurtech business opportunities. We see a combination of market and organizational priorities, which open the door for both external and internal opportunities.

External opportunities primarily relate to social and technological trends and pertain to the shift in customer needs and expectations (which digital technology has facilitated). Insurers have been taking action in these areas to stay relevant in the market and at least maintain their market position. For many companies, focusing on these opportunities remains critical, but this is not enough for them to gain a truly competitive advantage.

External opportunities:

  • Are mainly driven by customer expectations and needs and enabled by technology.
  • Offer front runners the opportunity to gain market relevance and position themselves.
  • Also offer fast followers opportunity because value propositions can be quickly replicated.

Internal opportunities relate to using technology to enhance operations and business function execution. For example, some insurers have used artificial intelligence (AI) technology to enhance internal operations, which has improved efficiencies and automated existing customer-facing, underwriting and claims processes.

Internal opportunities are:

  • Mainly driven by technological advancements.
  • A source of competitive advantage but demand deeper change.
  • An opportunity to set the foundation for how the company understands and manages risk.

To take full advantage of these opportunities, insurers need to determine their innovation needs and make meaningful connections with innovators. Doing so will help them balance their innovation mix – in other words, where they can make incremental innovations (the ones that keep them in the game) and where they can strive for real breakthroughs with disruptive and radical innovation (the ones that position them as market leaders).

See also: 10 Predictions for Insurtech in 2017  

Some examples of change are:

  • Incremental: Omni-channel integration, leveraging mobile and social media solutions and experiences to follow existing trends in customer and partner interaction;
  • Disruptive: Usage-based and personalized insurance that leverages technology and data to develop new risk models based on behavioral factors. This also has the potential to drive radical change.
  • Radical: Crop insurance, where data from different sources (such as weather and soil sensors) is leveraged to optimize and predict yield. As a result of this deterministic model, claims are paid up-front at harvest time.

There is no single perfect innovation mix. It depends on a company’s strategic goals and willingness to invest. Insurers should take into account current insurtech trends and determine long-term potential market scenarios based in part on current indicators and emerging trends. A short-term view will not foster the change that leads to breakthrough innovation.

As a starting point, the following questions can help you evaluate how prepared your organization is to drive innovation.

  • Corporate structure
    • Which parts of your organization drive innovation? Does the push for innovation occur at the corporate or business unit level (or both)?
    • How is the board engaged on decisions about the organization’s innovation mix?
    • What is the organization doing to make innovation a part of its culture?
    • What are the main challenges your organization faces when driving innovation?

  • Strategy, ideation and design
    • How does your organization become familiar with new trends and their implications?
    • To what extent has your organization used an “outside-in” view to inform your innovation model?
    • Which potential future scenarios have you identified and shared across the organization?
    • To what extent have you aligned your innovation portfolio strategy with potential future scenarios?
    • How does your organization approach ideation through execution?
    • Which capabilities are you leveraging to enable and accelerate the execution of new ideas?
  • External participation
    • What investments has your organization made in innovation?
    • In which areas is your organization participating (e.g., autonomous cars, connected economies, shared economies)
    • What structures (potentially in specific locations) has your organization created to support external participation?
    • To what extent has your organization managed to attract talent and partners?

Fast prototyping is key to quickly creating minimally viable products/solutions (MVP) and bringing ideas to life. Early stage start-ups develop and deploy full functioning prototypes in near-real time and go-to-market with solutions that are designed to evolve with market feedback. In this scenario, the development cycle is shortened, which allows startups to quickly deliver solutions and tailor future releases based on usage trends and feedback and to accommodate more diverse needs.

Incumbents can follow the same approach and align appropriate capabilities and resources to develop their own prototypes. They also can partner with existing startups that have a minimally viable product (MVP) to help them to move to the next stage, scaling. For this, they have to take into consideration several factors, including operational capacity, cyber risk and regulation (among others) to deploy the MVP in an “open” market. As opposed to controlled pilots or proofs of concept that are controlled environments, this “open” market is driven by demand. Lack of proper resources and the inability to scale the startup will severely compromise or actually prevent successful innovation.

See also: 7 Predictions for IoT Impact on Insurance  

The ways to accomplish all of this vary based on how the organization plans to source new opportunities and ideas, how it plans on executing innovation and how it plans to deploy new products and services. The following graphic provides examples of enterprise innovation operating models by primary function.

Final thoughts

In a fast-paced digital age, insurers are balancing insurtech opportunities with the challenge of altering long-standing business processes. While most insurers have embraced change to support incremental innovation, bigger breakthroughs are necessary to compete with the new technologies and business models that are disrupting the industry.

This article was written by Stephen O’Hearn, Jamie Yoder and Javier Baixas.

FinTech: Epicenter of Disruption (Part 4)

This is the final part of a four-part series. The first article is here. The second is here. The third is here.

FinTech is more than technology. It is a cultural mindset. Companies hoping to flourish need to shift their thinking to better meet customer needs, constantly track technological developments, aggressively engage with external partners and integrate digitization into their corporate DNA. To fully leverage the potential of FinTech, financial institutions (FIs) should have a top-down approach and embrace new technologies in every aspect of their businesses.

Putting FinTech at the heart of the strategy

The majority of our respondents (60%) put FinTech at the heart of their strategy. In particular, a high number of CEOs agree with this approach (78%), supporting the integration of FinTech at the top levels of management. Advances in technology and communication, combined with the acceleration of data growth, empower customers at nearly every level of engagement, making FinTech essential at all levels.

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Our survey supports this notion. Among the respondents that regard themselves as fully customer-centric, 77% put FinTech at the heart of their strategy, while, among respondents that see themselves as only slightly customer-centric, only 27% put FinTech at the same level. A smaller but still significant share of respondents disagrees with putting FinTech at the heart of their strategy (13%). This might be a business risk in the long run, as firms that do not recognize the impact of FinTech will face fierce competition from new entrants. As rivals become more innovative, incumbents might run the risk of being surpassed in their core business strengths.

The share of respondents from fund transfer and payments organizations that want to put FinTech at the heart of their strategy exceeds 80%, a high proportion compared with other sectors. At the other extreme are insurance and asset and wealth management companies, where, respectively, only 43% and 45% of respondents consider FinTech to be a core element of their strategy.

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Adopting a ‘mobile-first’ approach

Adopting a “mobile-first” approach is the key to improving customer experience. As Section 2 shows, the biggest trends in FinTech will be related to the multiple ways financial services (FS) engages with customers.

Traditional providers are increasingly taking a “mobile-first” approach to reach out to consumers (e.g. designing their products and services with the aim of enhancing customer engagement via mobile). More than half (52%) of the respondents in our survey offer a mobile application to their clients, and 18% are currently developing one. Banks, 81% of which offer mobile applications, are, increasingly, using these channels to deliver compelling value propositions, generate new revenue streams and collect data from customers. According to Bill Gates, in the year 2030, two billion new customers will use their mobile phones to save, lend and make payments.

Significant growth in clients using mobile applications is expected by 2020. While, currently, the majority of respondents (66%) contend that not more than 40% of their clients use their mobile applications, 61% believe that, over the next five years, more than 60% of their clients will be using mobile applications at least once a month to access financial services.

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Toward a more collaborative approach

Whether FS organizations adopt digital or mobile strategies, integrating FinTech is essential. According to our survey, the most widespread form of collaboration with FinTech companies is joint partnership (32%). Traditional FS organizations are not ready to go all-in and invest fully in FinTech. Joint partnership is an easy and flexible way to get involved with a technology firm and harness its capabilities within a safe test environment. By partnering with FinTech companies, incumbents can strengthen their competitive position and bring solutions or products into the market more quickly. Moreover, this is an effective way for both incumbents and FinTech companies to identify challenges and opportunities, as well as to gain a deeper understanding of how they complement one another.

Given the speed of technology development, incumbents cannot afford to ignore FinTech. Nevertheless, a significant minority—rather than a non-negligible share (25%)—of survey respondents do not interact with FinTech companies at all, which could lead to an underestimation of the potential benefits and threats they can bring. According to The Economist, the majority of bankers (54%) are either ignoring the challenge or are talking about disruption without making any changes. FinTech executives confirm this view: 59% of FinTech companies believe banks are not reacting to the disruption by FinTech.

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Integrating FinTech comes with challenges

A common challenge FinTech companies and incumbents face is regulatory uncertainty. FinTech represents a challenge to regulators, as there may be a risk of an uneven playing field between the FS and FinTech companies. In fact, 86% of FS CEOs are concerned about the impact of overregulation on their prospects for growth, making this the biggest threat to growth they face. However, the problems do not correspond to specific regulations but rather to ambiguity and confusion. Industry players are asking which regulatory agencies govern FinTech companies. Which rules do FinTech companies have to abide by? And, specifically, which FinTech companies have to adhere to which regulations? In particular, small players struggle to navigate a complex, ever-increasing regulatory compliance environment as they strive to define their compliance model. Recent years have brought an increase of regulations in the FS industry, where even long-standing players are struggling to keep up.

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While most FS providers and FinTech companies would agree that the regulatory environment poses serious challenges, there are differences of opinion on which are the most significant. For incumbents, IT security is crucial. This highlights the genuine constraints traditional FS organizations face regarding the introduction of new technologies into existing systems. On the other hand, fund transfer and payments businesses see their biggest challenges in the differences in operational processes and business models. The complexity of processes and emerging business models, as explained in Section 1, which aim to lead the payments industry into a new era, have the potential to both disrupt and complement traditional fund transfer and payments institutions. Their challenge lies in refining old methods while pioneering new processes to compete in the long run.

Just more than half of FinTech companies (54%) believe management and culture act as roadblocks in their dealings with FIs. Because FinTech companies are mainly smaller, they are more agile and flexible. And, because most are in the early stages of development, their structures and processes are not set in stone, allowing them to adapt more easily and quickly to challenges.

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Conclusion

Disruption of the FS industry is happening, and FinTech is the driver. It reshapes the way companies and consumers engage by altering how, when and where FS and products are provided. Success is driven by the ability to improve customer experience and meet changing customer needs.

Information on FinTech is somewhat dispersed and obscure, which can make synthesizing the data challenging. It is therefore critical to filter the noise around FinTech and focus on the most relevant trends, technologies and start-ups. To help industry players navigate the glut of material, we based our findings on DeNovo insights and the views of survey participants, highlighting key trends that will enhance customer experience, self-directed services, sophisticated data analytics and cyber security.

In response to this rapidly changing environment, incumbent financial institutions have approached FinTech in various ways, such as through joint partnerships or start-up programs. But whatever strategy an organization pursues, it cannot afford to ignore FinTech.

The main impact of FinTech will be the surge of new FS business models, which will create challenges for both regulators and market players. FS firms should turn away from trying to control all parts of their value chain and customer experience through traditional business models and instead move toward the center of the FinTech ecosystem by leveraging their trusted relationships with customers and their extensive access to client data.

For many traditional financial institutions, this approach will require a fundamental shift in identity and purpose. The new norm will involve turning away from a linear product-push approach to a customer-centric model in which FS providers are facilitators of a service that enables clients to acquire advice and interact with all relevant actors through multiple channels.

By focusing on incorporating new technologies into their own architecture, traditional financial institutions can prepare themselves to play a central role in the new FS world in which they will operate at the center of customer activity and maintain strong positions, even as innovations alter the marketplace.

FIs should make the most of their position of trust with customers, brand recognition, access to data and knowledge of the regulatory environment to compete. FS players might not recognize the financial industry of the future, but they will be in the center of it.

This post was co-written by: John Shipman, Dean Nicolacakis, Manoj Kashyap and Steve Davies.

FinTech: Epicenter of Disruption (Part 3)

This is the third in a four-part series. The first article is here. The second is here.

Typically, disruption hits a tipping point at which just less than
50% of the incumbent revenue is lost in about a five-year timeframe. Recent disruptions that provide valuable insight include streaming video’s impact on the video rental market. When broadband in the home reached ubiquity and video compression technology matured, low-cost streaming devices were developed and, within four years, the video rental business was completely transformed. The same pattern can be seen in the Internet-direct insurance model for car insurance. At present, 50% of the revenue from the traditional agent-based distribution model has been moved to direct insurance providers.

Revenue at risk will exceed 20% by 2020

According to our survey, the vast majority (83%) of respondents from traditional financial institutions (FIs) believe that part of their business is at risk of being lost to standalone FinTech companies; that figure reaches 95% in the case of banks. In addition, incumbents believe 23% of their business could be at risk because of the further development of FinTech, though FinTech companies anticipate they may be able to acquire 33% of the incumbents’ business. In this regard, the banking and payments industries are feeling more pressure from FinTech companies. Fund transfer and payments industry respondents believe they could lose as much as 28% of their market share, while bankers estimate that banks are likely to lose 24%.

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A rebalancing of power

FinTech companies are not just bringing concrete solutions
to a morphing consumer base, they are also empowering customers by providing new services that can be delivered with the use of technological applications. The rise of “digital finance” allows consumers to connect to information anywhere at any time, and digital services can address their needs in a more convenient way than traditional nine-to-five financial advisers can.

According to our survey, two-thirds (67%) of the companies ranked pressure on margins as the top FinTech-related threat. One of the key ways FinTechs support the margin pressure point through innovation is step function improvements in operating costs. For instance, the movement to cloud-based platforms not only decreases up-front costs but also reduces continuing infrastructure costs. This may stem from two main scenarios. First, standalone FinTech companies might snatch business opportunities from incumbents, such as when business-to-consumer (B2C) FinTech companies sell their products and services directly to customers and position themselves as more dynamic and agile alternatives to traditional players. Secondly, business-to-business (B2B) FinTech companies might empower specific incumbents through strategic partnerships with the intent to provide better services.

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FinTech, a source of opportunities

FinTech also offers myriad possibilities for the financial services (FS) industry. B2B FinTech companies create real opportunities for incumbents to improve their traditional offerings. For example, white label robo-advisers can improve the customer experience of an independent financial adviser by providing software that helps clients better navigate the investment world. In the insurance industry, a telematics technology provider can help insurers track risks and driving habits and can provide additional services such as pay-as-you-go solutions.

Partnerships with FinTech companies could increase the efficiency of incumbent businesses. Indeed, a large majority of respondents (73%) rated cost reduction as the main opportunity related to the rise of FinTech. In this regard, incumbents could simplify and rationalize their core processes, services and products and, consequently, reduce inefficiencies in their operations.

But FinTech is not just about cutting costs. Incumbents partnering with FinTech companies could deliver a differentiated offering, improve customer retention and bring in additional revenues. In this regard, 74% of fund transfer and payment institutions consider additional revenues to be an opportunity coming from FinTech. This is already true in the payments industry, where FinTech generates additional revenues through faster and easier payments and digital wallet transactions.

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This post was co-written by: John Shipman, Dean Nicolacakis, Manoj Kashyap and Steve Davies.

FinTech: Epicenter of Disruption (Part 2)

This is the second in a four part series. To read the first article click here.

To help industry players navigate the changes in the banking, fund transfer and payments, insurance and asset and wealth management sectors, we have identified the main emerging trends that will be most significant in the next five years in each area of the FS industry.

Overall, the key trends will enhance customer experience, self-directed services, sophisticated data analytics and cybersecurity. However, the focus will differ from one FS segment to another.

Banks are going for a renewed digital customer experience

Banks are moving toward non-physical channels by implementing operational solutions and developing new methods to reach, engage and retain customers.

As they pursue a renewed digital customer experience, many are engaging in FinTech to provide customer experiences on a par with large tech companies and innovative start-ups.

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Simplified operations to improve customer experience

The trends that financial institutions are prioritizing in the banking industry are closely linked. Solutions that banks can easily integrate to improve and simplify operations are rated highest in terms of level of importance, whereas the move toward non-physical or virtual channels is ranked highest in terms of likelihood to respond.

Banks are adopting new solutions to improve and simplify operations, which foster a move away from physical channels and toward digital/mobile delivery. Open development and software-as-a-service (SaaS) solutions have been central to giving banks the ability to streamline operational capabilities. The incorporation of application program interfaces (APIs) enables third parties to develop value-added solutions and features that can easily be integrated with bank platforms; and SaaS solutions assist banks in offering customers a wider array of options—which are constantly upgraded, without banks having to invest in the requisite research, design and development of new technologies.

The move toward virtual banking solutions is being driven, in large part, by consumer expectations. While some customer segments still prefer human interactions in certain parts of the process, a viable digital approach is now mandatory for lenders wishing to compete across all segments. Online banks rely  on transparency, service quality and unlimited global access to attract Millennials, who are willing to access multiple service channels. In addition, new players in the banking market offer ease of use in product design and prioritize 24/7 customer service, often provided through non-traditional methods such as social media.

So what?—Put the customer at the center of operations

Traditional banks may already have many of the streamlined and digital-/mobile-first capabilities, but they should look to integrate their multiple digital channels into an omni-channel customer experience and leverage their existing customer relationships and scale. Banks can organize around customers, rather than a single product or channel, and refine their approach to provide holistic solutions by tailoring their offerings to customer expectations. These efforts can also be supported by using newfound digital channels to collect data from customers to help better predict their needs, offer compelling value propositions and generate new revenue streams.

Fund transfer and payments priorities are security and increased ease of payment

Our survey shows that the major trends for fund transfer
and payments companies are related to both increased ease and security of payments.

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Safe and fast payments are emerging trends

Smartphone adoption is one of the drivers of changing payments patterns. Today’s mobile-first consumers expect immediacy, convenience and security to be integral to payments. In our culture of on-demand streaming of digital products and services, archaic payment solutions that take days rather than seconds for settlement are considered unacceptable, motivating both incumbents and newcomers to develop solutions that enable transfer of funds globally in real time. End users also expect a consistent omni-channel experience in banking and payments, making digital wallets key to streamlining the user experience and enabling reduced friction at the checkout. Finally, end users expect all of this to be safe. Security and privacy are paramount to galvanizing support for nascent forms of digital transactions, and solutions that leverage biometrics for fast and robust authentication, coupled with obfuscation technologies, such as tokenization, are critical components in creating an environment of trust for new payment paradigms.

So what?—Speed up, but in a secure way

Speed, security and digitization will be growing trends for the payments ecosystem. In an environment where traditional loyalty to financial institutions is being diminished and barriers to entry from third parties are lowered, the competitive landscape is fluid and potentially changeable, as newcomers like Apple Pay, Venmo and Dwolla have demonstrated. Incumbents that are slow to adapt to change could well find themselves losing market share to companies that may not have a traditional payments pedigree but that have a critical mass of users and the network capability to enable payment experiences that are considered at least equivalent to the status quo. While most of these solutions “ride the rails” of traditional banking, in doing so they risk losing control of the customer experience and ceding ground to innovators, or “steers,” who conduct transactions as they see fit.

Asset and wealth management shifts from technology-enabled human advice to human-supported technology-driven advice

The proliferation of data, along with new methods to capture it and the declining cost of doing so, is reshaping the investment landscape. New uses of data analytics span the spectrum from institutional trading and risk management to small notional retail wealth management. The increased sophistication of data analytics is reducing the asymmetry of information between small- and large-scale financial institutions and investors, with the latter taking advantage of automated FS solutions. Sophisticated analytics also uses advanced trading and risk management approaches such as behavioral and predictive algorithms, enabling the analysis of all transactions in real time. Wealth managers are increasingly using analytics solutions at every stage of the customer relationship to increase client retention and reduce operational costs. By incorporating broader and multi-source data sets, they are forming a more holistic view of customers to better anticipate and satisfy their needs.

Spread Out

Given that wealth managers have a multitrillion-dollar opportunity in the transfer of wealth from Baby Boomers to Millennials, the incorporation of automated advisory capabilities—either in whole or in part—will be a prerequisite. This fundamental change in the financial adviser’s role empowers customers and can directly inform their financial decision-making process.

So what?—Withstand the pressure of automation

Automated investment advice (i.e. robo-advisers) poses a significant competitive threat to operators in the execution-only and self-directed investment market, as well as to traditional financial advisers. Such robot and automatic advisory capabilities will put pressure on traditional advisory services and fees, and they will transform the delivery of advice. Many self-directed firms have responded with in-house and proprietary solutions, and advisers are likely to adapt with hybrid high-tech/high-touch models. A secondary by-product of automated customer analysis is the lower cost of customer onboarding, conversion and funding rates. This change in the financial advisory model has created a challenge for wealth managers, who have struggled for years to figure out how to create profitable relationships with clients in possession of fewer total assets. Robo-advisers provide a viable solution for this segment and, if positioned correctly as part of a full service offering, can serve as a segue to full service advice for clients with specific needs or higher touch.

Insurers leverage data and analytics to bring personalized value propositions while managing risk

The insurance sector sees usage-based risk models and new methods for capturing risk-related data as key trends, while the shift to more self-directed services remains a top priority to efficiently meet existing customer expectations.

Together

Increasing self-directed services for insurance clients

Our survey shows that self-directed services are the most important trend and the one to which the market is by far most likely to respond. As is the case in other industry segments, insurance companies are investing in the design and implementation of more self-directed services for both customer acquisition and customer servicing. This allows companies to improve their operational efficiency while enabling online/mobile channels that are demanded by emerging segments such as Millennials. There have been interesting cases where customer-centric designs create compelling user experiences (e.g. quotes obtained by sending a quick picture of the driving license and the car vehicle identification number (VIN)), and where new solutions bring the opportunity to mobilize core processes in a matter of hours (e.g. provide access to services by using robots to create a mobile layer on top of legacy systems) or augment current key processes (e.g. FNOL3 notification, which includes differentiated mobile experiences).

Usage-based insurance is becoming more relevant

Current trends also show an increasing interest in finding new underwriting approaches based on the generation of deep risk insights. In this respect, usage-based models—rated the second most important trend by survey participants—are becoming more relevant, even as initial challenges such as data privacy are being overcome. Auto insurance pay-as-you-drive is now the most popular usage-based insurance (UBI), and the current focus is shifting from underwriting to the customer. Initially, incumbents viewed UBI as an opportunity to underwrite risk in a more granular way by using new driving/ behavioral variables, but new players see UBI as an opportunity to meet new customers’ needs (e.g. low mileage or sporadic drivers).

Data capture and analytics as an emerging trend

Remote access and data capture was ranked third by the survey respondents in level of importance. Deep risk (and loss) insights can be generated from new data sources that can be accessed remotely and in real time if needed. This ability to capture huge amounts of data must be coupled with the ability to analyze it to generate the required insights. This trend also includes the impact of the Internet of Things (IoT); for example, (1) drones offer the ability to access remote areas and assess loss by running advanced imagery analytics, and (2) integrated IoT platforms solutions include various types of sensors, such as telematics, wearables and those found in industrial sites, connected homes or any other facilities/ equipment.

So what?—Differentiate, personalize and leverage new data sources

Customers with new expectations and the need to build trusted relationships are forcing incumbents to seek value propositions where experience, transaction efficiency and transparency
are key elements. As self-directed solutions emerge among competitors, the ability to differentiate will be a challenge.

Similarly, usage-based models are emerging in response to customer demands for personalized insurance solutions. The ability to access and capture remote risk data will help develop a more granular view of the risk, thus enabling personalization. The telematics-based solution that enables pay-as-you-drive is one of the first models to emerge and is gaining momentum; new approaches are also emerging in the life insurance market where the use of wearables to monitor the healthiness of lifestyles can bring rewards and premium discounts, among other benefits.

Leveraging new data sources to obtain a more granular view of the risk will not only offer a key competitive advantage in a market where risk selection and pricing strategies can be augmented, but it will also allow incumbents to explore unpenetrated segments. In this line, new players that have generated deep risk insights are also expected to enter these unpenetrated segments of the market; for example, life insurance for individuals with specific diseases.

Finally, we believe that, in addition to social changes, the driving force behind innovation in insurance can largely be attributed
to technological advances outside the insurance sector that will bring new opportunities to understand and manage the risk (e.g. telematics, wearables, connected homes, industrial sensors, medical advances, etc.), but will also have a direct impact on some of the foundations (e.g. ADAS and autonomous cars).

Blockchain: An untapped technology is rewriting the FS rulebook

Blockchain is a new technology that combines a number of mathematical, cryptographic and economic principles to maintain a database between multiple participants without the need for any third party validator or reconciliation. In simple terms, it is a secure and distributed ledger. Our insight is that blockchain represents the next evolutionary jump in business process optimization technology. Just as enterprise resource planning (ERP) software allowed functions and entities within a business to optimize business processes by sharing data and logic within the enterprise, blockchain will allow entire industries to optimize business processes further by sharing data between businesses that have different or competing economic objectives. That said, although the technology shows a lot of promise, several challenges and barriers to adoption remain. Further, a deep understanding of blockchain and its commercial implications requires knowledge that intersects various disparate fields, and this leads to some uncertainty regarding its potential applications.

Blocks

Uncertain responses to the promises of blockchain

Compared with the other trends, blockchain ranks lower on the agendas of survey participants. While a majority of respondents (56%) recognize its importance, 57% say they are unsure or unlikely to respond to this trend. This may be explained by the low level of familiarity with this new technology: 83% of respondents are at best “moderately” familiar with it, and very few consider themselves to be experts. This lack of understanding may lead market participants to underestimate the potential impact of blockchain on their activities.

The greatest level of familiarity with blockchain can be seen among fund transfer and payments institutions, with 30% of respondents saying they are very familiar with blockchain (meaning they are relatively confident about their knowledge of how the technology works).

How the financial sector can benefit from blockchain

In our view, blockchain technology may result in a radically different competitive future in the FS industry, where current profit pools are disrupted and redistributed toward the owners of new, highly efficient blockchain platforms. Not only could there be huge cost savings through its use in back-office operations, but there could also be large gains in transparency that could be very positive from an audit and regulatory point of view. One particular hot topic is that of “smart contracts”—contracts that are translated into computer programs and, as such, have the ability to be self-executing and self-maintaining. This area is just starting to be explored, but its potential for automating and speeding up manual and costly processes is huge.

Innovation from start-ups in this space is frenetic, with the pace of change so rapid that by the time print materials go to press, they could already be out-of-date. To put this in perspective, PwC’s Global Blockchain team has identified more than 700 companies entering this arena. Among them, 150 are worthy to be tracked, and 25 will likely emerge as leaders.

The use cases are coming thick and fast but usually center on increasing efficiency by removing the need for reconciliation between parties, speeding up the settlement of trades or completely revamping existing processes, including:

    • Enhancing efficiency in loan origination and servicing;
    • Improving clearing house functions used by banks;
    • Facilitating access to securities. For example, a bond that could automatically pay the coupons to bondholders, and any additional provisions could be executed when the conditions are met, without any need for human maintenance; and
    • The application of smart contracts in relation to the Internet of Things (IoT). Imagine a car insurance that is embedded
      in the car and changes the premium paid based on
      the driving habits of the owner. The car contract could also contact the nearest garages that have a contract with the insurance company in the event of an accident or a request for towing. All of this could happen with very limited human interaction.

So what?—An area worth exploring

When faced with disruptive technologies, the most effective companies thrive by incorporating them into the way they do business. Distributed ledger technologies offer FS institutions a once-in-a-generation opportunity to transform the industry to their benefit, or not.

However, as seen in the survey responses, the knowledge of and the likelihood to react to the developments in blockchain technology are relatively low. We believe that lack of understanding of the technology and its potential for disruption poses significant risks to the existing profit pools and business models. Therefore, we recommend an active approach to identify and respond to the various threats and opportunities this transformative technology presents. A number of start-ups in the field, such as R3CEV, Digital Asset Holdings and Blockstream, are working to create entirely new business models that would lead to accelerated “creative destruction” in the industry. The ability to collaborate on both the strategic and business levels with a few key partners, in our view, could become a key competitive advantage in the coming years.

This post was co-written by: John Shipman, Dean Nicolacakis, Manoj Kashyap and Steve Davies.

FinTech: Epicenter of Disruption (Part 1)

It is difficult to imagine a world without the Internet or mobile devices. They have become core elements of our lifestyle and have brought a high degree of disruption to virtually every area of business. The financial services (FS) industry is no exception; the digital revolution is transforming the way customers access financial products and services. Although the sector has experienced a degree of change in recent years, the constant penetration of technology-driven applications in nearly every segment of FS is something new. At the intersection of finance and technology lies a phenomenon that has been accelerating the pace of change at a remarkable rate and is reshaping the industry’s status quo—it is called FinTech.

What is FinTech?

FinTech is a dynamic segment at the intersection of the financial services and technology sectors where technology-focused start-ups and new market entrants innovate the products and services currently provided by the traditional financial services industry. As such, FinTech is gaining significant momentum and causing disruption to the traditional value chain. In fact, funding of FinTech start-ups more than doubled in 2015, reaching $12.2 billion, up from $5.6 billion in 2014, based on the companies included on our DeNovo platform. Cutting-edge FinTech companies and new market activities are redrawing the competitive landscape, blurring the lines that define players in the FS sector.

Our objectives and approach

This report assesses the rise of new technologies in the FS sector, the potential impact of FinTech on market players and those players’ attitudes toward the latest technological developments. Additionally, the report offers strategic responses to this ever-changing environment.

Our analysis is based on the following:

  1. Primary data derived from the results of a global survey that includes feedback from a broad range of players in the world’s top financial institutions—For this study, we surveyed 544 respondents, principally chief executive officers (CEOs), heads of innovation, chief information officers (CIOs) and top-tier managers involved in digital and technological transformation. Our survey was distributed to leaders in various segments of the FS industry in 46 countries.
  2. Insights and proprietary data from DeNovo, PwC’s Strategy& platform, composed of a 50-member team of FinTech subject matter specialists, strategists, equity analysts, engineers and technologists with access to more than 40,000 public and proprietary data sources.

In the first section, we explore FS market participants’ perspectives on disruption. Next, we’ll highlight the main emerging FinTech trends in the various FS industries and the readiness of the market to respond to these trends. Finally, we’ll offer suggestions about how market players should strategically approach FinTech.

The Epicenter of Disruption

New digital technologies are in the process of reshaping the value proposition of existing financial products and services. While we should not underestimate the capacity of incumbents to assimilate innovative ideas, the disruption of the financial sector is clearly underway. And consumer banking and payments, already on the disruption radar, will be the most exposed in the near future, followed by insurance and asset management.

Disruption targets mostly consumer banking and payments

In keeping with the changes already underway, the majority of our survey participants see consumer banking as well as fund transfer and payments as the sectors most likely to be disrupted over the next five years.

In consumer and commercial lending, for example, the emergence of online platforms allows individuals and businesses to lend and borrow between each other. Lending innovation also manifests in alternative credit models, use of non-traditional data sources and powerful data analytics to price risks, rapid customer-centric lending processes and lower operating costs.

In recent years, the payments industry has also experienced a high level of disruption with the surge of new technology-driven payment processes, new digital applications that facilitate easier payments, alternative processing networks and the increased use of electronic devices to transfer money between accounts.

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Asset management and insurance are also on the disruption radar

Although a high level of disruption triggered by FinTech is already beginning to reshape the nature of lending and payment practices, a second wave of disruption is making inroads in the asset management and insurance sectors. Our survey found that this perception is confirmed by insiders. Nearly half of insurers and asset and wealth managers consider their respective industries to be the most disrupted. When asked which part of the FS sector is the most likely to be disrupted by FinTech over the next five years, 74% of insurance companies identified their own industry, while only 26% of players from other sectors agreed; 51% of asset managers said their industry will be disrupted, while only 31% of other players agreed.

However, there seems to be a perception gap here. Professionals from other industries do not see the same level of disruption in these areas. The fact that only insiders are aware of this situation, while outsiders don’t perceive it, could indicate the disruption is in its very early stages. Even so, venture capitalists are looking very closely at start-ups dedicated to reinventing the way we invest money and buy insurance. Annual investments in InsurTech startups have increased fivefold over the past three years, with cumulative funding of InsurTechs reaching $3.4 billion since 2010, based on companies followed in our DeNovo platform.

The pace of change in the global insurance industry is accelerating more quickly than could have been envisaged. The industry is at a pivotal juncture as it grapples with changing customer behavior, new technologies and new distribution and business models.

The investment industry is also being pulled into the vortex of vast technological developments. The emergence of data analytics in the investment space has enabled firms to home in on investors and deliver tailored products and automated investing. Additionally, innovations in lending and equity crowdfunding are providing access to asset classes formerly unavailable to individual investors, such as commercial real estate.

Customer-centricity is fueling disruption

As clients are becoming accustomed to the digital experience offered by companies such as Google, Amazon, Facebook and Apple, they expect the same level of customer experience from their financial services providers. FinTech is riding the waves of disruption with solutions that can better address customer needs by offering enhanced accessibility, convenience and tailored products. In this context, the pursuit of customer-centricity has become a main priority, and it will help to meet the needs of digital native clientele.

Over the next decade, the average FS consumer profile will change dramatically as the Baby Boomer generation ages and generations X and Y assume more significant roles in the global economy. The latter group, also known as “Millennials” (those born between 1980 and 2000), is bringing radical shifts to client demographics, behaviors and expectations. Its preference for a state-of-the-art customer experience, speed and convenience will further accelerate the adoption of FinTech solutions. Millennials seem to be bringing a higher degree of customer-centricity to the entire financial system, a shift that is being crystallized in the DNA of FinTech companies. While 53% of financial institutions believe that they are fully customer-centric, this share exceeds 80% for FinTech respondents. In this respect, 75% of our respondents confirmed that the most important impact FinTech will have on their businesses is an increased focus on the customer.

This post was co-written by: John Shipman, Dean Nicolacakis, Manoj Kashyap and Steve Davies.