Tag Archives: ipad

Lemonade Really Does Have a Big Heart

Twelve months ago, Lemonade opened for business. For me, it marked the start of a new chapter in the history of the insurance industry. To coincide with their launch, I posted this article after speaking with CEO and co-founder Daniel Schreiber. The headline was “insurance will never be the same again!”

Of course, it was easy for me to make such a grand pronouncement 12 months ago, on the day that Lemonade hit the street. At that time, they had no customers, had not written any insurance and had certainly never paid a claim.

One year on, and Lemonade is up and running. Was I right to say insurance would never be the same again? I caught up with Daniel again to find out!

Disruptive Innovation

First things first, let me set some context. A question I get asked a lot by insurers and industry folk is, “why should we be interested in what Lemonade are doing?” It’s a great question and exactly what they should be asking. (I also point out that they need to be really interested in what ZhongAn is doing, as well).

To massively over-simplify and paraphrase Clayton Christensen, Lemonade has brought simplicity, convenience and affordability to a marketplace where the existing offering is complicated, expensive and inaccessible.

This is why the incumbent insurers need to take note when Lemonade pays a claim in three seconds. Otherwise, they could end up like DEC. Once the market leaders in minicomputers, DEC dismissed the rise of PCs, only to watch helplessly as IBM and Apple ate their lunch with personal computers.

Or Kodak, the inventor of digital photography. The company was too wedded to an outdated business model that relied on people printing their photos. That was until it was too late, and Kodak went from being the world’s fourth largest brand to bankrupt in less than two decades!

Now, it might have taken about 15 years for the demise of Kodak and about 10 for DEC to wake up and smell the coffee. The point being that disruptive innovations don’t take hold overnight; they need time to gain traction and build momentum.

But in this digital age, this speed of change is increasing. This is the key characteristic in the World Economic Forum’s definition of the 4th Industrial Revolution. It took Google just five years to hit a $1 billion in revenues. And Amazon only four!

Just think about this for a second. A decade ago, we didn’t have the iPhone, the iPad, Kindle, Uber, AirBnB, Android, Spotify, Instagram, WhatsApp, 4G. Could you imagine life without these now? Could you conceive that insurance is going to change and for the better?

You trust me, and I will trust you

There is another reason why incumbent insurers should be watching Lemonade very closely. It has addressed the fundamental issue with insurance and customer perception, which is trust, behavior and the conflict of interest.

There’s a ton of research and data that shows customers don’t trust insurers. And for good reason.

Insurers make the product complicated by using fancy jargon that Joe and Josephine Bloggs can’t understand. Insurers get paid up front and then create hurdles and barriers when the customer rightfully asks the insurer to do what they’ve already paid them to do.

And worse, the customer has to prove they are not a liar to the insurer’s satisfaction before a penny is paid out.

“Insurance fraud has become a self-fulfilling prophecy for incumbent insurers,” Daniel said. “They don’t trust customers to be fair and honest. This drives their behavior toward customers. And guess what, customers respond accordingly. Which justifies the insurer’s behavior in the first place. It’s a vicious circle that neither side can break.”

See also: Lemonade’s New Push: Zero Everything  

Lemonade’s virtuous circle

This conflict of interest doesn’t exist in the Lemonade business model. By operating as a tech platform that is also an insurance carrier, Lemonade has separated cost of operations from the pool of risk capital. It has also raised the bar when it comes to total cost of operations at 20% GWP.

Lemonade don’t profit from non-payment of a claim (in the way an incumbent insurer does). The company starts by trusting customers to make honest claims. Which is why Lemonade pays out straight away, with around a third of claim payouts fully automated. No human intervention at all.

Lemonade accepts that there are a few bad apples but works on the premise that most of us are fundamentally decent people.

It is usually at this point that the diehards and old laggards of the insurance industry start throwing fraud and loss data at me. Citing decades of data that proves Lemonade will eventually crash and burn under the weight of inflated and illegal claims.

My response is always the same “hands up everyone who is a bad person.” Of course, no hands go up because the vast majority of us are decent, respectful, honest people.

Which is why Lemonade has now had six, yes ,SIX, customers who have handed claims payouts back.

Just think about this for a moment.

A customer makes a claim (in seconds), gets paid (immediately), finds the situation has changed (later), realizes he got paid too much (oops!), then gives the payment back (you kidding me?).

Could the customer’s behavior be directly related to Lemonade’s behavior?

Yes, certainly! You only have to look at customer behavior at Grameen Bank in Bangladesh to see that trust can be relied  upon. Here, unsecured personal loans are repaid on time without the need for credit scores and debt collection agencies.

You don’t have to take my word for it, either. Hot out of the oven is this video of Lemonade customers in New York.

So, what’s the story, one year on?

Lemonade has been true to its word on the subject of transparency.

Throughout the year, the company has published its numbers, warts and all, for everyone to see. Building and maintaining trust is fundamental to Lemonade’s business model, and this starts with being open and honest.

Daniel has shared with me the latest numbers, and they are very impressive. I won’t repeat them here, because I know the team will be posting them all shortly in the latest Transparency Chronicles. They’re proud of the numbers, and rightly so.

See also: Lemonade: World’s First Live Policy  

All I will say is that Daniel and the team have steered a considered and thoughtful course in their first year. They could have chased the numbers, as many first year startups would do, only to regret the quality of business they end up with.

But Lemonade’s team has stuck to their knitting, have impressive growth numbers, a quality customer base completely aligned to the brand and are now licensed in 18 states (with more to follow).

Our job has only just started,” Daniel said. “Over the next year, we will continue to make insurance easier and better for our customers. One area we’ve started to look at now is the underlying insurance language and the products that form the heart of all insurance.”

Are you surprised?

You shouldn’t be! Lemonade is a highly professional startup and will no doubt become the definitive case study for exactly how “it” should be done.

But has this surprised Daniel?

“There are two things that have surprised us this year,” Daniel told me. “First, the extent of the warm reception we’ve received across the industry and from customers. We hoped customers would like us, but we never took for it granted.

“After all, you can’t beta test a new insurance company. The MVP (minimally viable product) approach simply doesn’t apply to insurance. It’s regulated and has to be the real deal from the get-go, right first time. So, for us, having customers put their faith in Lemonade from Day One has been very satisfying.

“The second is that our faith in humanity and behavioral economics has been affirmed. There will always be people who want to game the system, but on the whole, all our expectations about customer behavior have been exceeded.

“Who would have thought we would have six customers who gave their claim payouts back. That is very gratifying and also humbling for us. And gives us encouragement to continue doing what we are doing.”

Lemonade is live; insurance will never be the same again!

For me, I’m convinced. Historians will look back to Sept. 21, 2016, the day that Lemonade opened for business, as a watershed for the insurance industry.

Which means, of course, that the key question now is, who among the incumbent insurers will provide the Kodak moment? The one who simply missed that the world had changed until it was too late.

Insurance Technology Trends in ’17, Beyond

Bill Gates famously said that we always overestimate the amount of change that will occur in the next two years and underestimate the change that will occur in the next 10. Looking back 10 years, we find a world devoid of iPads, iPhones, mobile apps, big data technologies, the Internet of Things, viable driverless cars or even social media beyond a niche early adopter group. We also find a world without direct online sales of commercial insurance, without persistent low interest rates, without widespread use of catastrophe bonds and without VCs who could spell “insurance.”

But while most insurers believe that massive changes may occur in the next decade, few believe that the next two years will be substantially different from the last two when it comes to the need for significant product changes, the impact of predictive analytics or the threats of new digital distributors. Insurers devote less than one cent of each premium dollar today to transforming their technology capabilities to thrive in the next decade.

Insurers Making Technological Progress

Although technology spending is essentially flat, and less than a quarter of it is spent on transformational initiatives, on average, insurers are making progress. Use of predictive analytics is growing, and 18% of insurers believe it will have a materially positive effect on their business this year. Big data technology is expanding, as well, even though it continues to be directed not at big data sets but at solving enterprise data problems. And 10% to 20% are already embracing machine learning to improve their rating algorithms. Other AI usage is still in the potential stage, with insurers exploring the possibilities of leveraging machine vision for property underwriting and claims, and natural language processing for customer service.

Digital investments continue, even if there is still little agreement about what constitutes a “digital strategy” for insurers. Portals are enhanced, and mobile is deployed as carriers seek to better engage their customers, distributors and other stakeholders.

See also: 10 Trends at Heart of Insurtech Revolution  

Core system replacements are still painful and expensive but necessary to enhance the speed of product launches, improve digital service and data accessibility and reduce technical risk. Insurers have a new willingness to consider cloud-based core systems, with 20% already having deployed some core capabilities in a cloud environment and the same number planning pilot programs this year. The maturity of cloud providers and the growing awareness of their own limitations are mitigating carriers’ security concerns.

Security, meanwhile, continues to consume 10% of IT budgets, with no end in sight, and additional regulatory requirements add compliance pressure to certify procedures and formalize CISO roles.

A boom in analytics and digital across multiple industries is making it harder for insurers to find and retain IT talent, which is driving new strategies, from partnering with colleges and universities to develop new sources of talent to improving ease of employee return, to reacquire experienced staff.

With flat resources and burgeoning needs, 40% of insurers are improving governance to make sure resources are allocated effectively and aligned with strategy.

Laying Bare the Underlying Structure of the Insurance Industry

Meanwhile, improved technology lays bare the underlying structure of the insurance industry. It’s not only distributors standing between insureds and primary insurers that are intermediaries facing the threat of disintermediation—it’s every link in the value chain between people or organizations with risk and pools of capital willing to take on that risk for a profit. This means primaries and reinsurers, as well. Alternative distribution, distributor-developed programs, reinsurer-funded insurtech startups and catastrophe bonds and other risk derivatives all threaten the traditional insurance value chain. All of these stem from the technology-enabled democratization of the ability to analyze, package and transfer risk.

At the same time, technology offers the opportunity to ask new questions about the structure of insurance offerings. Is there any reason why minimum required coverage should be sold in all cases bundled with additional coverages, advice, service and risk management? Insurers are finding that some market segments prefer only one or two of these, while there are additional opportunities to monetize some of these offerings separately.

Many insurers are unsettled by the emergence of well-funded insurtechs, whether they are new competitors or providing enhanced capabilities to existing competitors. Despite the billions invested, insurtechs will not put major insurers out of business or radically transform the market in the next two years. Many will not even be in business in two years.

The Imperative to Learn from Insurtech

However, insurtechs will raise the bar on customer experience and process efficiency, as well as on the use of analytics to drive product and processes. They will show insurers how to expand the market by profitably serving underserved segments, and demonstrate how to incorporate emerging technology into key business processes. Insurers that do not learn from insurtech will lose out to those that do.

In part driven by the example of insurtechs, insurers are expanding their own formal innovation programs. These may take the form of a small group of educators and evangelists within the company, a dedicated R&D organization with a fully equipped lab and a protected budget or direct investing in startups.

See also: Insurtech: Unstoppable Momentum  

Two Ingredients of Successful Innovation

Whatever innovation path insurers take, the primary determinant of success is the CEO’s and business unit leaders’ commitment to operationalize innovations, and their tolerance for the risk of failure. Without these two ingredients, insurers may perform “innovation theater” but are unlikely to benefit from any discoveries, and are unlikely to be prepared when the next decade of change sneaks up on them.

Why I’m Skeptical on Apple’s Future

Facebook is releasing its virtual reality headset, Oculus. It is big, clunky and expensive, and it will cause nausea and other problems for its users. Within a few months of its release, we will declare our disappointment with virtual reality while Facebook will carefully listen to its users and develop improvements. Version No. 3 of Oculus, which will, most likely, come in 2018 or 2019, will be amazing. It will change the way we interact with each other on social media and take us into new worlds—much like the holodecks we saw in “Star Trek.”

This is how innovation happens now, innovation and elsewhere. You release a basic product and let the market tell you how to make it better. There is no time to get it perfect; your product may become obsolete before it is even released.

Apple has not figured this out yet. It maintains a fortress of secrecy, and its leaders dictate product features. When it releases a new technology, it goes to extremes to ensure elegant design and perfection. Steve Jobs was a true visionary, but he refused to listen to customers—believing he knew what they needed better than they did. He ruled with an iron fist and did not tolerate dissent of any type. At Apple, people in one division did not know what others in the company were developing.

Seven announcements Apple made in the March keynote

Jobs’ tactics worked very well for him, and he created the most valuable company in the world. But without Jobs, given the dramatic technology changes that are happening, Apple may have peaked. It is headed the way of IBM in the ’90s and Microsoft in the late 2000s. Consider that Apple’s last major innovation—the iPhone—was released in June 2007.

See Also: Apple v. FBI: Inevitable Conflicts on Tech

Since then, Apple has been tweaking its componentry, adding faster processors and more advanced sensors and releasing bigger and smaller forms—such as with the iPad and the Apple Watch. Even the announcements Apple made this month were uninspiring: smaller iPhones and iPads. All Apple seems to be doing is playing catch up with Samsung, which offers tablets and phones of many sizes and has better features. Apple has been also been copying products (such as Google Maps) but not doing it very well.

There was a time when technology enthusiasts like me felt compelled to buy every new product Apple released. We applauded every small, new feature and pretended it was revolutionary. We watched Steve Jobs’ product announcements with bated breath. However, now I would not even have bought the iPhone a few months ago unless T-Mobile included a large rebate to switch networks. There is nothing earth-shattering or compelling about Apple’s new phones—or, for that matter, any of the products it has released since 2007.

By now, Apple should have released some of the products we have heard rumors about: TV sets, virtual reality headsets and cars. Apple could also have added the functionality of products, such as Leap Motion and Kinect, with the iPhone functioning as a Minority Report motion detector and projector. Apple should be doing what Facebook is doing: putting out new products and letting the market judge them. And Apple should be doing moonshots like Google, which is toying with self-driving cars; Internet delivery via balloon, drone and microsatellite; and Google Glass. Yes, Apple might have failed with the first version—just as Google did with Glass—but that is simply a learning experience. The third version of Google Glass is also likely to be a killer product.

Instead of innovating, Apple has been launching frivolous lawsuits against competitors like Samsung. My colleague at Stanford Law School, Mark Lemley, estimated Apple had spent more than $1 billion in attorney and expert fees in its battle against Samsung. And this lawsuit netted Apple just $158,400, which, ironically, went to Samsung. Apple could have better spent its money on the acquisitions of companies that would give it a real edge.

Will Apple release some products later this year that will blow us away? I am skeptical. I expect we will only see more hype and more repackaging of tired old technologies.

Join Vivek Wadhwa for the Path To Transformation Symposium by registering here.

Why Millennials Are the Best Workers

It has become fashionable to trash Millennials. They lack a strong work ethic, have no grit, aren’t respectful or patient and definitely don’t understand corporate culture. The trashing fits with how people romanticize the 1950s as the golden age of American culture, when everything was just somehow better.

I don’t know whether Gen X is just irritated that they’re getting older or whether people are forming their opinions solely based on Buzzfeed, but I think the stereotype is wrong - dead wrong. In fact, I will go out on a limb and state that Millennials may actually be the best generation of workers we’ve ever seen.

And I say this having hired hundreds of new college grads – and seasoned professionals – over the past 20 years. Here’s why:

1. They’re too big for their britches.

Today’s young job seekers have grown up with a startup mentality. The value of embracing failure has been etched into their psyche by entrepreneurs and tech titans like Steve Jobs and Elon Musk. So, unlike past generations, they are not necessarily looking for stability. They don’t dream of landing a job at GM or IBM. They approach positions with the understanding that they may have to put in 110% to succeed, even with the near certainty that their employer won’t be around five years from now.

Put that in contrast to the stigma of entitlement attached to Millennials. It’s true that many baby boomer parents have raised them with a perspective of possibility. They’ve been encouraged to follow their dreams and passions. And from watching Mark Zuckerberg or President Obama, they’ve learned first-hand that it’s not just dogma; anything really is possible.

So where some see entitlement, I see greater authenticity and audacity.

Millennials will shoot for the stars – and if they fall down, they’ll get right back up and try a different way.

2. They just don’t communicate the way you do.

If you’ve watched “Mad Men,” you’ve seen the fast-paced advertising world struggle to become more connected with innovations like… the speaker phone. Fast forward to today, where first-time job seekers not only understand and embrace collaborative technologies but don’t know anything different.

While many offices struggle to get their workforce to embrace services like Yammer or Basecamp, Millennials have been doing those things for years. They’ve been learning with social classroom tools and chatting on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram every waking hour. As a result, they actually conceive of communication in a one-to-many paradigm, which is a huge plus for companies that are spread out globally and interact primarily in a virtual environment.

3. They expect things to happen instantly.

I don’t know anyone over the age of 50 who doesn’t complain about how fast the world is moving these days. However, in the case of job performance, that’s a very very good thing. Think about it. Thirty years ago, everything took a lot more time. The data you needed to make critical business decisions was delivered weeks later by a mail truck. Someone had to physically be sitting in a predetermined location at the right time for you to call on the phone.

Our expectations for accomplishing tasks were, naturally, based on the resources and structures we had in place. Simply put, we moved much slower. And, God bless them, there are many professionals out there who still work the same way.

Not Millennial workers. With the pace of news, communication and responsiveness nearly instant, that’s how they approach work. They know nothing else. Plus, they have the necessary tools to support them. Give a Millennial employee a research assignment on your competitors, and you’ll get the project back in 24 hours. Twenty years ago, the same project might have taken a month. One piece of advice: Just make sure you attach a deadline to the assignment.

4. They expect too much.

Studies show that young job seekers today are passionate about how their jobs affect the world. In fact, they value job fulfillment over monetary reward. Many balk at the traditional model of doing charitable good only when you have reached a certain level of economic wealth or solely in your free time. They want to reach financial well-being and achieve social good simultaneously .

What does that mean for employers? I would hope it could open the doors to two things. First, we have the ability to retain skilled and valuable Millennial workers by creating environments where social impact is lauded. That will reduce employee turnover and save companies thousands of dollars each year in recruiting, hiring and lost productivity.

More important, Millennials are a driving force toward significant, scalable and lasting social change that will benefit everyone, whether it’s about the environment, socioeconomic diversity or just a healthier work-life balance. In case you’ve forgotten, the U.S. ranks the worst among all modern economies in vacation time and pay.

5. They think differently from you.

Millennials are the most diverse generation in U.S. history. Minorities, roughly a third of the U.S. population today, are expected to become the majority by 2042. So Millennials don’t just embrace diversity on the job; they expect it.

From race and religion to gender and sexuality, they’ve come of age with a greater comfort of multiplicity of all kinds. They’ve entered adulthood with an African-American president and been the catalyst for many states legalizing same-sex marriage. Female leaders like Hillary Clinton and Sheryl Sandberg have shaped their views on gender equality.

Imagine how that translates in the workplace. The payoffs touch every single area of a business by opening the doors to increased creativity, agility and productivity, new attitudes and language skills, a more global understanding, new solutions to difficult problems, stronger customer and community loyalty and improved employee recruitment and retention.

6. They are obsessed with technology.

Today even the industries that historically have been slow to innovate are finally adopting a web- and mobile-first philosophy. Century-old brick-and-mortar stores are fighting to keep Amazon at bay; healthcare finds itself transformed by the Affordable Care Act. Job seekers with coding and programming skills from Java to Ruby to SQL are desperately needed at all types of companies right now. Big data analytics, video game design, app development, software architecture – the list goes on and on for highly sought Millennial workers with tech expertise. But the issue isn’t just about the hard skills they bring.

If you’ve spent any time with a child lately, you’ve probably noticed that they can master an iPad within minutes. It’s mind-blowing – and a little frightening – to imagine how future generations of consumers will interact with technology.

Millennial workers are the bridge to that future, through social media, mobile, the cloud and other real-time technologies that haven’t even been invented yet. They are graduating with both academic skills and innate behavioral skills that companies will need to engage with customers in much more meaningful (and profitable) ways.

It’s the way Millennials think about technology, and their relationship with it, that is changing everything. So, having Millennial employees on staff to advise on your customer relations strategy or spearhead innovative new mobile and social media programs is invaluable for any business of any size, place or industry.

A Word With Shefi: Kerridge at Hiscox

This is part of a series of interviews by Shefi Ben Hutta with insurance practitioners who bring an interesting perspective to their work and to the industry as a whole. Here, she speaks with Kevin Kerridge, the head of Hiscox Direct, who says, among other things, that the UK is five years ahead of the U.S. on small business insurance.

To see more of the “A Word With Shefi” series, visit her thought leader profile. To subscribe to her free newsletter, Insurance Entertainment, click here.

Describe what you do in 50 words or less:

Building a business in the USA for Hiscox that is reinventing small business insurance — selling policies direct to consumers and through a select group of distribution partners.

What led you to your career in insurance?

I wish I could say it was some form of grand plan, but it wasn’t. I come from a very humble background and from the age of 11 found small jobs around the neighborhood to earn some extra pennies. It’s served me well over the years in relation to work ethic and never taking anything for granted. Despite good grades at high school, my parents couldn’t afford to send me to college, and so I decided to go straight into work — the most attractive offer being an insurance company. The rest is history.

Describe the Hiscox brand in one sentence:

Bold, courageous and contemporary — coupled with a sense of tradition where it matters, in areas like integrity, honesty and being human. As an insider, it feels like we’re in the insurance industry but not of it.

Name one similarity and one difference between how consumers shop for insurance in the U.S. vs. the UK:

The UK is five years ahead of the U.S. in the small business insurance space. In the UK, the first place most small businesses go for insurance is the web, whereas in the U.S. it’s still the local agent who dominates. One similarity is that small business consumers see insurance as a low-interest purchase — they want to get the right coverage, fast and at good value for money — so that they can focus their energy on running and growing their business.

Do you think insurance agents are a thing of the past for small business insurance?

Absolutely not — but they will look different than they do today. At Hiscox, we’ve leveraged our investment in the direct-to-consumer infrastructure to enable agents to access our custom small business products for their existing customer base. Our wholesalers love it because it gives them a very efficient and effective way to win in the $500 premium space — our slick technology solution coupled with their valued expertise is a powerful mix.

What has been instrumental in establishing Hiscox’s presence in the U.S. small business insurance space in a relatively short amount of time?

Two things came together very quickly for us in 2010 – an obvious market opportunity where business consumers were moving to the web, and no market incumbents were serving that need. Having already built this business in the UK, the ace up our sleeves was our crystal ball in relation to an intimate understanding of what it takes to make that business model a success. In addition to our crystal ball, we are also lucky enough to have an executive team with the stomach to invest behind this opportunity – the investment required for success is material (think hundreds not tens of millions of dollars) and the path to profit is a long one. A patient executive team and shareholders are critical.

In 2010, Hiscox was the first insurer to allow the actual sale of small business insurance to occur online for your products and classes. What allows Hiscox to truly deliver the promise of omnichannel?

Too many insurance businesses are still inwardly focused; going into dark rooms to build very complex solutions they think they can sell to consumers. At Hiscox, we try to build around the customer. As an aspiration, we talk about being a marketing and technology company that just so happens to provide insurance products — we’re not quite there yet, but having that mindset is important.

What do you find the most challenging in Hiscox’s digital operation?

The speed of change and building a technology infrastructure to keep up with that. We started building the blueprint for our U.S. small business operation in 2009 — it feels like it was just yesterday, and yet the iPad didn’t even exist then, and I think I was still using a 56k dial-up modem at the time.

Five years later, are small business owners ready to really buy insurance online?

I’m still trying to figure out whether that’s a trick question! Hundreds of thousands of small businesses have already purchased insurance online in the U.S., and those numbers will only continue to grow. The real question is whether the insurance industry is ready to make the material shift needed to provide small business consumers with the online purchasing experience they’re accustomed to experiencing online.

What is the strategy or the thinking behind Courageous Leaders, and what do you hope to achieve with it?

In our overall U.S. business, our brand platform is Encourage Courage. It’s not about courage in taking insurance risk, but a more holistic view of the courage needed to build successful businesses and embrace those emotional fears we all have in life. In this respect, we have huge affinity with the small business community – many of whom put everything on the line to follow their passion. Courageous Leaders is a celebration of entrepreneurial courage — and us tipping our hat to the courage they show. I hope it inspires others.

What other insurance brand (insurer, vendor etc.) do you admire and why?

There are a handful of small brands in the online small business insurance space that are showing tremendous entrepreneurial spirit in grasping the changing small business insurance landscape — I have great admiration for them. They truly are the gold prospectors of our industry in these times.

Favorite quote?

Two come to mind, both from people who have had a massive impact on my career and life, and both quotes said to me in person. The first, from Robert Hiscox, was, “I don’t mind you losing me money occasionally, Kevin, but never lose me my reputation.” The second was from our Group CEO, Bronek Masojada: “In life there are good bets. And there are bad bets. But not all good bets are winning bets.”

When you are not working in insurance, you are most likely…

I love spending time with my amazing wife and four wonderful children — just taking in everyday experiences together, from cooking to traveling. I’m blessed that they’ve all been willing to make sacrifices along the way to support my passion for what we’re doing at Hiscox. Outside of that, my one selfish passion is fishing — the thrill of the catch, coupled with some downtime in the fresh air to collect my thoughts…