Tag Archives: inventory

Broad Array of Roles for Disability Coverage

In the world of disability insurance, most financial advisers think of personal income protection. This is only the beginning of the possibilities that the adviser may be able to provide to safeguard clients, their businesses and assets. There are many products available within the disability insurance realm and diverse opportunities to provide your expertise.

Diversity of Product:

Key Person

The most valuable asset in a business is the people. Imagine if one of your key executives had an illness or an accident and was unable to work and continue creating revenue and profit for your company. What effect would this have on the bottom line? How would you replace the lost revenue?

Retirement/Deferred Compensation

At a closely held, family owned business, benefit plans favoring the family and the senior management are important for retention and reward. Over the past year, a non-qualified deferred compensation plan is put in place for the top 10 executives. What happens if one of the executives becomes sick or hurt and is unable to work and contribute to the plan? Can the plan be funded? If yes, how?

Contract Fulfillment

The board of a company just signed the largest contract in company history for a new CEO. The contract has financial guarantees, performance bonuses and the other usual language. What happens if the CEO becomes ill or has an accident and is unable to perform his duties? The company is on the hook for the financial guarantees. Should this be funded out of company cash flow or have the liability transferred through a disability insurance policy?

Loan Protection

There are more than 21 million small business loans valued at more than $600 billion. Business loans are taken out for business-related expenses, such as:

  • Purchase or expansion of a practice or business
  • Purchase of a large piece of equipment
  • Facility renovations
  • An increase in working capital or build-up of inventory
  • Purchase of a building or land for a business

It may make sense to provide disability insurance to cover the business loans in the event the business owner has a disabling accident or illness. There are separate insurance policies or riders to a traditional policy that provides benefits to cover the loan or loan payment obligations.

Impaired Risk

Perhaps a client will not qualify for traditional or even non-traditional coverage because of an extensive medical history. Impaired risk coverages can work for pre-existing medical conditions.

Diversity of Opportunity:

QSPP Can Prevent Dysfunction and Disruption

  • Could you continue to pay a disabled employee’s salary from your business?
  • How long could you afford to pay a salary?
  • Would the payments you pay be deductible to your business?

It is the American dream: turn a simple idea into a start-up and, through innovation, hard work and the right people, grow that start-up into an industry leader. It may seem obvious that a business owner would want to do everything to protect the people who help grow the business. As the business grows, however, offering everyone the same protection in the case of injury or illness may become difficult. Owners have a tendency to focus on partners, executive staff and key employees. This is a completely logical line of thinking, but without a Qualified Sick Pay Plan (QSPP) in place, it could put the business at high risk.

A QSPP is a formalized plan determining who will be paid, how much will be paid and how long salary will be continued when employees are unable to work because of an injury or illness. The plan can have different determinations for different classes of employees within the company. It can also be self-funded, or funded through an insured product, such as disability income policies.

Why a QSPP?

There are two key reasons: tax implication of benefits paid and potential precedent. The Internal Revenue Code states that wages paid to a disabled employee may not be deductible as a business expense unless they are paid under a salary continuation program. Without a program in place, any payments made are not deductible by the business and are fully taxable to the employee.

The implementation of a plan allows a business to deduct wages paid to employees who cannot work, and an employee can receive qualified benefits tax-free. The absence of a QSPP could result in the IRS disallowing benefits paid to an employee as sick pay. This would have serious tax implications on the employer and the employee.

An even greater danger to an employer is the existence of benefit payment precedent. It may seem completely logical to continue the salary of key employees responsible for revenue growth, but, without a QSPP, any sick pay for any employee creates a precedent of the same pay for all employees. Any variation between employees could be viewed as discrimination. To eliminate this risk, it is important to create a formal, written plan stating any differences of salary continuation length or frequency between classes of employees before an employee needs to use it.

How Is a QSPP Implemented?

A QSPP requires two components: a plan resolution and plan letters to employees.

A plan resolution is drafted and executed by the company’s board. This resolution defines the classes of employees, how benefits will be paid and how long they will be paid.

Plan letters communicate the information to the employees. They can be class-specific.

How Can Benefits Under a QSPP Be Funded?

This is an important consideration. A QSPP can be fully self-funded, fully insured or a combination. If a plan is fully self-funded, the company can be burdened with all of the responsibility of determining who cannot work and how long they can’t work and of paying benefits from company accounts during a time when, depending on the person who cannot work, the company may need the funds the most. Additionally, the FASB 112 Accounting Rule makes a company become an insurance company by requiring it to carry the present value of future claims as a liability on the balance sheet if it chooses to self-fund a salary continuation program. Two implications of FASB 112 are:

  • Companies with self-funded disability programs must set aside all the money upfront
  • This requirement can significantly reduce profits while increasing liabilities

Under a QSPP plan with disability income insurance, the insurance company determines when your employees cannot work, the insurance company determines how long they cannot work and the company pays smaller, regular payments for the benefit during a time when all employees are actively at work. A fully insured plan not only takes much of the liability away from the employer, but it also allows the company to predict future plan costs. Disability income insurance premiums are level for the life of the policies. Three tax shelters of an insured salary continuation program are:

  • Premiums paid are deductible as a fringe benefit expense (IRC Section 162(a)).
  • Employer premiums are not included in employee’s taxable income. (IRC Section 106).
  • A special tax credit may be available for employees that are permanently and totally disabled (IRC Section 22(b)).

In working with the son of the owners of a medium-sized technology security firm, I learned that Mom and Dad would take care of the son if anything were ever to happen. As a financial adviser, what do we do now? A conversation about the company benefits and what the parent/owners wanted to have happen with their family and their employees created an opportunity. By educating the clients on sick pay plans, we were able to provide better recommendations to the owner (parents) for the benefit of the son and the other employees while keeping the firm in legal compliance.

Divorce Settlements

Most if not all settlements include division of assets and liabilities owned by the parties. Additionally, when appropriate, especially if there are children involved, there is an alimony agreement. What happens to the continuing alimony payment if the payer becomes sick or hurt and unable to earn the income to make the support payment?

With the divorce rate at 50% or higher for U.S. marriages, there is an opportunity to protect a spouse and provide the children a source of income used for living and educational expenses. The solution is to place a disability insurance policy on the payer, with the spouse as beneficiary.

Occupational Diversity

Students, coaches, umpires, golf professionals, chefs, race car drivers, comedians and musicians, to name just a few, are thought to have a hard time obtaining disability income insurance. They are not hard to insure if you are able to go a little deeper within the traditional markets or outside to the non-traditional markets.

Our hobbies sometimes position us to have access to people in these diverse occupations. One of my hobbies is to watch, listen and learn from professional speakers. It has been a privilege to spend time with some of the all-time greats. I am always amazed at their accessibility if you step forward and participate. Once, I hosted Chris Gardner, who became nationally know for his life story through the movie “Pursuit of Happiness,” where his role was played by Will Smith. As Chris and I began building a relationship, he learned about our firm, and it became evident that no one had spoken to him about protecting his flow of income from a disabling accident or illness.

There are many diverse opportunities for you as the adviser to protect your client’s flow income, business entity and valued assets. Think beyond personal disability insurance and help your clients understand their needs to secure their financial foundations.

A Technology Breakthrough for Valuing Tangible Assets

What are your clients’ tangible assets worth? If you are like most advisors, you don’t have a clear answer. Without that clarity, you are leaving yourself and your clients at risk. Tangible assets – valuables ranging from fine art and wine to classic cars and jewelry – make up an ever-increasing portion of household wealth. Yet there is little visibility into this asset class.

Why? Often, individuals find the process of documenting, tracking and managing the values of tangible assets to be tedious. Instead of producing a thorough inventory, the insured may opt for a blanket umbrella policy that covers general contents as a percentage of the home’s value. The individual may list certain items, but with inadequate documentation. Many times, both the insured and the insurer fail to keep up as the market value of collections changes.

Fortunately, technology has emerged that makes collecting and managing information about tangible assets significantly easier. Appraisers can collect detailed data and provenance on property and possessions and upload them to a personal, online digital locker, where the items are regularly valued, securely managed, and are accessible anytime. Individuals will soon be able to use their smartphones to take a picture of a valuable object and upload it directly to this locker. As items are added and values change, the owner is notified – and can choose to automatically alert his advisors, including insurers and wealth managers, to ensure the items are accounted for and adequately protected.

The continuous transparency that the locker provides into values can be eye-opening to users.  Case in point: A family in the Northeast has a large, valuable art collection. Thirty years ago, the family had the pieces insured, using estate values provided by auction houses. These values, as a rule, are much lower than retail replacement values, so the family’s collection was initially insured at about half of what it should have been. The collection had not been appraised since the early 1980s, and, when a wealth manager had it re-appraised in 2012, values had changed so substantially that a piece initially valued at several hundred thousand dollars now carries a fair market value of more than $50 million.

The consequences of this type of undervaluation are significant. Had the owner passed away before the revaluation, the estate could have suffered an immense tax bill. In the event of loss, theft, fire or water damage, the owner would have been severely underinsured and faced significant loss. In addition, had the owners known the higher value of the artwork, they could have sold or leveraged it.

The bottom line is: With more information about their valuables, individuals  – and their advisors – can make more informed decisions.

This ability to capture, securely store and provide real-time valuations is a momentous step forward in tangible wealth management, and has been made possible by several technological advancements:

1. Data About Prized Possessions
There is a massive amount of data now available on luxury items. Whether a person’s passion investment is wine, diamonds, classic automobiles or fine art, there is a database that captures the real-time value changes in the category. By using technology to process that data, individuals gain a better composite view of their wealth, a greater idea of potential liquidity options, and a more accurate way to assess risk.

2. Digital Collection — Onsite and at Retail
In the not-so-distant past, a person had to take pictures or videos and store them on a hard drive, keep receipts in a safe deposit box, and use a spreadsheet to capture information on valuables. Now that all communication and record keeping has gone digital, certified appraisers can use apps to capture all of this information on-site. Merchants can email electronic receipts. Individuals can snap a picture of any acquired item, add support information like a receipt, package art, or bar or QR-code and send it to their personal digital locker in real time. All of this information is securely accessible anytime, anywhere.

3. Cloud Storage and Connectivity
Once information is collected electronically, it can be safely and securely stored in a personal digital locker in the cloud. This eliminates the need for paper records or other media that can be lost, stolen, or destroyed.  In addition to storage, the cloud provides connectivity, creating a virtual ecosystem where individuals can privately view the value of their tangible assets and manage those assets. This new capability includes easy connections to on-line auction houses, dealers, insurers, wealth manager and the like to sell, insure, donate, or take other beneficial actions powered by information about everything a person owns.

Ultimately, data is currency, and new technology is helping individuals cash in on the data about their tangible wealth. The information about possessions has inherent value. By adopting emerging technologies to collect, value and connect the information about individuals’ personal property, individuals and their advisors can finally gain transparency into tangible assets – completing the total wealth picture.