Tag Archives: insurance producer

Find Your Voice as an Insurance Agent

“If you talk about what you believe, you will attract those who believe what you believe.” Simon Sinek.

Recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that there are 374,700 active insurance agents in the U.S. alone.

How can you as an agent find a way to stand out in the highly competitive arena?

It starts with finding your voice.  Microphone

When I say finding your voice, I don’t necessarily mean your tone quality, pacing or vocabulary.

I’m talking about the language you speak to yourself, BEFORE you speak it to the world.

It begins with your inner voice.

How do you speak? Not just the words, but the voice you project.

Your voice is a statement and picture of your character, your poise and your persona. It is a statement of belief, confidence and personal power.

So how do you make your voice authentically yours?

  • When you do what you believe in
  • When you do what you are passionate about
  • When you work in your chosen field
  • When you find your calling
  • When you discover something you were born to do

The Myth of Chasing Success

I love talking with motivated insurance producers. They have big goals and dreams and work with fearless energy.

I often hear about chasing success.

As the late great Jim Rohn stated, “Success is not to be pursued, it is to be attracted by the person you become.”

The point is that chasing or pursuing success is a daunting task. Where do you even start?

It starts with becoming a better you and with your passion for personal growth.

When you grow personally by working on your skills and development, you will attract others by finding your unique voice.

As your belief system, confidence and passion develop, so does your internal and external voice.

If you want to stand out and be noticed in among the crowd of 374,700 other insurance agents, start by looking within.

The Need for ‘Price-Driven Costing’

In 1973, I began my insurance career as a claims’ adjuster. We handled some of the first claims in the new NFIP Flood Program. There was chaos.

A year later, I was hired by Cumis Insurance to staff a new sales office in Baton Rouge,LA. The market hardened dramatically, capacity was limited and our office closed before we sold a policy. I learned about market cycles.

My next job was as an insurance producer. My job and the agency business were good. We were paid 25% commission on homeowners policies, there was no transparency (comparative rating didn’t exist in our part of the world) and the most exciting change was when Safeco allowed field men (yes, they were all men) to wear blue or buff-colored shirts in lieu of the traditional white.

During my first week at work, a colleague dropped an article titled “Marketing Myopia” on my desk and said, “read it.” The author was Theodore Levitt. The piece was then and still is a classic — and framed my thinking about an issue that has only grown in importance and must become  the future of insurance.

Levitt opened with an observation on the railroad industry, which declined because it defined itself incorrectly – “railroad-oriented instead of transportation oriented… product-oriented instead of customer-oriented.”

Levitt also mentioned a fundamental misunderstanding about the success of Henry Ford. “We habitually celebrate him for the wrong reasons: for his production genius. His real genius was marketing. We think he was able to cut his selling price and therefore sell millions of $500 cars because his invention of the assembly line had reduced the costs. Actually, he invented the assembly line because he had concluded that at $500 he could sell millions of cars. Mass production was the result, not the cause, of his low prices.”

From 1978 to 1981, I represented Fireman’s Fund/FAMEX in its GM dealers program. At that time, the No. 1 concern of General Motors and its dealers was that GM would gain 65% market share and that the government would then break GM into Cadillac, Buick, Oldsmobile, Pontiac, Chevrolet and GMC corporations. We all know how this played out.

In 1993, I opened my consulting practice focusing on CHANGE – its management and architecture. (“The best way to predict the future is to create it,” as Peter Drucker said.) I spoke to the leadership of a community bank and said that, although GM, IBM and Sears were the giants in their respective industries, “one of these three will ultimately go bankrupt.” The bankers rolled their eyes and laughed. We all know how this played out. (In my children’s lifetime, I may prove right on the other two.)

Later that same year, Drucker offered an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal, titled “The Five Deadly Business Sins.” It said, “The third deadly sin is cost-driven pricing. The only thing that works is price-driven costing. Most American and practically all European companies arrive at their prices by adding up costs and then putting a profit margin on top… their argument, ‘we have to recover our costs and make a profit.’

“This is true but irrelevant; customers do not see it as their job to ensure manufacturers profit. The only sound way to price is to start out with what the market is willing to pay.”

Levitt’s voice echoes his agreement from the “Marketing Myopia” article, when he says, “Our policy is to reduce the price, extend the operation and improve the article. You will notice the reduction of price comes first.” Drucker’s wisdom closed the circle that began with my reading of “Marketing Myopia.”

In 1994, I became the executive director of the Louisiana Managed Healthcare Association (LMHA) – the health maintenance organization (HMO) association. I quoted Drucker dozens of times as I attempted to explain the difference between the then-existing fee-for-service system and the new world of “capitation” and “managed care.” I was shouted down more than I was applauded.

That same year, a couple named Harry and Louise (in a TV ad campaign) defeated Bill and Hillary’s attempt to reform healthcare. Fast forward another 20 years and Obamacare is the law of the land. At its essence is managed care – a price-driven costing model. The market won’t go back to cost-driven pricing.

Two more observations from Drucker as your prepare for tomorrow — or choose to ignore it:

— “Because the purpose of business is to create a customer, the business enterprise has two and only two basic functions: marketing and innovation.”

Innovation is so necessary because customers are constantly changing. We must be defined and driven by clients.

–“There are now only three possible roads the financial services industry can take. The easiest, and usually most heavily traveled, is to keep doing what worked in the past. Going down this road means, however, steady decline….The second road – to be replaced, and probably fairly rapidly, by outside innovators – remains a possibility for today’s firms. But there is also a third and final road – to become innovators themselves and their own ‘creative destroyers.’”

Your future depends on more production but only at a price the market will pay. Your sustainability depends on innovating your processes to ensure profitable delivery whether your commission is hidden in the premium or disclosed or whether premiums are quoted net of commission.

Today, when I drive by a dealer, the genius of Drucker is reinforced. Look at a pickup truck on the lot. The window sticker shows the “cost-driven price.” The sign on the windshield celebrating a $12,000 discount is the price-driven cost.

If you want to sell a truck in today’s world, discounts are not optional!

The same is true for insurance.

A Bizarre but Common Strategy: Hiring Incompetent Producers

Hiring incompetent producers is apparently the strategy of a group of agency owners who told me that my advice that no producer is better than a bad producer was:

  1. Just wrong
  2. Too harsh
  3. Short-sighted

I have seen some consultants make the same case, so I thought I should have an open mind and reconsider my position.

The consultants’ point was that every commission dollar sold is worth (pick a multiple) 1.3 or 1.5 or 2.0 times. That makes every commission dollar a commodity. From the agency owners’ perspective, one way to build value is to put as many commission dollars on the books as possible because the value is same regardless of whether the sales are profitable or unprofitable. The value is not affected by whether the sales are personal lines or commercial, whether the accounts carry more or less E&O risk. All sales carry the same value, in this perspective.

Some people will argue I have taken the consultants’ and agency owners’ point too far, but that is impossible. Remember, their point was that poor producers, meaning unprofitable producers, still have enough value to justify keeping them. This means that even if the producers’ sales have a negative 20% profit margin, which is common, the consultants and agency owners believe these sales have the same effective value as books of business with a 20% profit margin.

The strategy of adding sales without regard to profitability is quite relevant if the agency can grow fast enough and sell itself quickly enough. More than one such flip has made an agency owner wealthy. The key is how long the producer is with the agency before the sale. Let’s say that at the end of five years a producer has generated $150,000 of commissions. The profit on this book is (using industry standards for agencies with $1 million to $2 million in revenue):

incompetent

 

This excludes all administrative wages such as the bookkeeper, receptionist, claims and so forth. It excludes ANY owner compensation. It understates the CSR compensation, too, because the average commercial CSR makes much more than $35,000. If we include these real additional expenses proportionately, this book likely is still losing money in the fifth year, anywhere from $10,000 to $30,000. Losses in the prior years were even greater as the book was built.

Over five years, then, the agency has likely lost between $75,000 and $150,000 net. Using $75,000 and a one-times multiple and an agency sale in year five, the agency still nets $75,000 (($150,000 times 1.0) – $75,000) = $75,000.

But if the agency hangs on too long or the five-year loss is too great, this strategy fizzles. So to make this work financially, the agency owner has to have a firm and fast exit plan.

Why not hire quality producers initially? Then the agency gets profit and value simultaneously. Besides, who in their right mind would pay the same multiple for an unprofitable book as for a profitable book? Let’s use an EBITDA example. If the profit is $25,000 and the EBITDA multiple is six, then the value is $150,000. What is the value of a book with a loss of $25,000 and a multiple of six times?

Why would someone pay the same multiple for a low-profit book as for a high-profit book? Maybe the thought is that books all average out. But why do they have to average out?

A poor producer cannot take an entire book, even most of a book, with him if fired. If the producers were so good, they would not have been fired. So agency owners can eliminate unprofitable producers and reassign their books to staff or other producers at lower commission rates, which is common when books are transferred between producers. This is a key secret to the success some serial acquirers have achieved. They completely understand that poor producers are unnecessary so when they buy, they fire and they keep the business but make it profitable. Even if 20% is lost, that is 20% losing money vs. 80% making money.

I truly feel for agency owners struggling to find quality producers. If it was easy, everyone would do it. Is hiring poor producers really the solution, though?

My experience, and I’ve seen the hard data, is that when agency owners properly prepare their agencies for finding quality producers, use the right interviewing tools and tests and create a quality development/management plan, successful hire percentages quadruple. All the work — and it is a lot of work —  is before the hire, and, given all that agency owners already have to do, finding the time and energy for this key element is not so easy, but it is essential if the goal is to truly build profit and value.