Tag Archives: insurance agent

auto insurance industry

$60 Billion Elephant in the Room

Research has found that one in four car crashes is caused by phone-related distracted driving. However, a recent LifeSaver study of agents suggests this figure to be a vast understatement. More than 60% of agents responded that half or more of all claims are now related to distracted driving.

It’s downright scary to think about the injuries, property damage and loss of life that results from distracted driving.

If our survey bears out on a national scale, the full cost could be north of $60 billion a year. And, of course, this cost is passed on to drivers in the form of increased premiums. In fact, we’re already seeing some major insurers (GEICOAllstate and Zurich) publicly conceding that they are feeling the pain from this fast-growing epidemic.

Assuming the annual cost to insurance companies ranges from $30 billion (if one in four accidents stems from phone-related distracted driving) to $60 billion (using the numbers from our research), a mere 10% reduction in distracted driving accidents would save insurance carriers and their customers several billion dollars annually, in addition to saving lives and drastically reducing injuries.

The infographic below highlights the cost of distracted driving to the insurance industry. It also offers some insight into the minds of insurance agents receiving these claims, as well as the habits of today’s distracted drivers. Take a look and let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

info

How to Choose the Right CRM Package

Perhaps the most important thing an insurer can do to keep clients and brokers happy is to implement the right kind of customer relationship management system and process. CRM lets the insurer anticipate needs and communicate effectively. The most obvious benefits of a good CRM system are:

  • Accessible client information, with the ability to view it in multiple dimensions
  • An automated tool for reminders
  • The ability to document prospect and broker files

But those are just the baseline benefits. With a more comprehensive system, you get usability that exceeds these minimal expectations. It can bring an insurer to a whole new technological landscape that improves retention levels and increases efficiency.

Choosing the Right CRM

Before selecting CRM software, determine who’s considered a customer, because that will dictate the features the CRM software must have. Prospects and policyholders are certainly customers, but many insurers miss out when they neglect to recognize that brokers are customers, too. The CRM software chosen needs to serve them, as well.

For maximum efficiency, choose a CRM that has certain integration functions. It should connect with other sales technology systems that you and your brokers use often, because service is the key differentiator.

To take sales and service to the next level, the CRM system should allow for data to be entered once and then pushed out to other systems, including quoting and underwriting. Distribution channel and prospect information can then be populated into a sales and underwriting system. Not only is this a more streamlined way to conduct business, it also helps the process feel more personal and customized for each user. Every sales representative can have all her information immediately. It also provides for more effective self-service on the web.

One-time entry also makes selling much easier for brokers and sales offices of the insurance company, which will always have access to updated information. This, in turn, makes your products more accessible and appealing. An advanced CRM system will also make reporting and reviewing analytics easier, allowing insurers to identify issues more easily and respond to them more quickly.

Activity tracking is also an important feature. Having an accurate record of changes and updates is important in both relationship management and regulatory compliance. Regulators increasingly demand insurers be able to document compliance.

Finally, you want to make sure your CRM software has configuration options that will maximize its utility for your company and brokers. Every company is unique, and CRM software that forces you into its box isn’t useful. You should be able to tailor a CRM system to make it work more efficiently for you, not have to work around it.

CRM software isn’t just about tracking and storing information—it’s about creating a collaborative environment among product managers, brokers, carriers and clients. Let the data flow—in a well-organized, transparent way that treats every person as a distinct individual with her own needs and expectations.

Find Your Voice as an Insurance Agent

“If you talk about what you believe, you will attract those who believe what you believe.” Simon Sinek.

Recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that there are 374,700 active insurance agents in the U.S. alone.

How can you as an agent find a way to stand out in the highly competitive arena?

It starts with finding your voice.  Microphone

When I say finding your voice, I don’t necessarily mean your tone quality, pacing or vocabulary.

I’m talking about the language you speak to yourself, BEFORE you speak it to the world.

It begins with your inner voice.

How do you speak? Not just the words, but the voice you project.

Your voice is a statement and picture of your character, your poise and your persona. It is a statement of belief, confidence and personal power.

So how do you make your voice authentically yours?

  • When you do what you believe in
  • When you do what you are passionate about
  • When you work in your chosen field
  • When you find your calling
  • When you discover something you were born to do

The Myth of Chasing Success

I love talking with motivated insurance producers. They have big goals and dreams and work with fearless energy.

I often hear about chasing success.

As the late great Jim Rohn stated, “Success is not to be pursued, it is to be attracted by the person you become.”

The point is that chasing or pursuing success is a daunting task. Where do you even start?

It starts with becoming a better you and with your passion for personal growth.

When you grow personally by working on your skills and development, you will attract others by finding your unique voice.

As your belief system, confidence and passion develop, so does your internal and external voice.

If you want to stand out and be noticed in among the crowd of 374,700 other insurance agents, start by looking within.

Google

What We Can Learn From Google Compare

“The Google Compare service itself hasn’t driven the success we hoped for.” Google Compare announced in an email to its partners that it would be shutting its insurance and financial products comparison service tools in the U.S. and U.K. as of March 23. The lack of traction in both usage and revenue generation were named as two key reasons. Those were the headlines across the industry this week. So Google Compare is done – for now.

This is big news for the insurance industry, which has spent the last year figuring out how to shield itself from the potential impact that the tech giant would make. It turns out Google didn’t make much of a splash after all. In addition to insurance, Google is backing out of credit cards, banking and mortgage products. Google said  it is shutting down for now and focusing on “improving the customer experience.” Maybe Google will be back in a year, maybe five years, but what can we learn from it now?

When Google Compare was launched in the U.S. last year, it took the industry by storm. The agent/broker ecosystem was skeptical of any success, but they were also fearful – given Google’s size, wealth and talent. Could Google disrupt personal auto quoting?

What the agent/broker ecosystems did was to keep their (potential) enemy close by understanding what they were doing. They watched and hoped for failure. Meanwhile, a handful of insurers signed up to be part of the California launch: those insurers who could easily connect to the Google platform and wanted to be part of a potential success. And these companies had to explain their actions to their agents – who were in the wings watching and waiting to see what would happen.

I have my own thoughts on why Google Compare failed this first go-around. First, consumers can get these quote comparisons elsewhere – insurers already do this. Next, maybe customers just aren’t quite ready for self-service compare engines – but by all accounts, they soon will be. I don’t think Google underestimated the complexity of insurance, nor do I think it underestimated the consumer. I think, probably, that the timing was off, and Google didn’t differentiate itself from existing solutions with comparative raters. Google probably lacked some of the innovation that would have been needed to differentiate itself from others in the market.

Google Compare, like many start-ups, has failed, at least for now. At SMA, we talk all the time about how there is an innovation journey and how even the best-laid plans will sometimes fail. Part of the journey is learning through failure and then coming back better than ever. This is especially true in insurance. The industry is complicated. It’s complex and heavily regulated. It experiences slow growth, a slow pace of change and relatively small profits. And it requires lots of resources, cash and expertise committed for a long time before it pays off. SMA research shows 88% of insurers understand that innovation projects may fail. Part of that acceptance indicates a growing ability to learn from failure.

So where do you place your bets moving forward? Will Google Compare opting out of insurance cause new disruption? Will new solutions move in to fill the void?

Many will place their bets on strong incumbents and today’s ecosystem. Insiders believe that, with Google Compare moving out, it will become unappealing for outsiders to move in and try to understand it, saying the barriers to success are too high. Others will say that something will come to disrupt and challenge the traditional ways of the comparative raters and that outsiders, with their naivete and innovative thinking, will find a pin hole in the ecosystems and exploit the market.

Either way, the wonderful thing about innovation is that it is the essence of change. The only constant is change. Things happen so quickly. Innovation can flip an industry on its side overnight. Google Compare isn’t going away forever; it is just shutting the blinds. While this may be a small win for the establishment insurers who viewed Google’s entry as a threat, it doesn’t mean these organizations should rest on their laurels. The time is now to innovate, fill a void and improve overall services. Finally, failures and what we learn from them serve to set the ground work for change and innovation. It is part of the innovation journey to improve and adapt. As we continue this year, I am confident there will be more changes to the industry … so stay tuned.