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What to Do When Catastrophes Go Viral

The power of social media is undeniable. Whether it’s political movements, disasters, or breaking news, social media delivers unfiltered information instantaneously to people around the world. When a catastrophe occurs today, comments, pictures and video are likely to appear on the Internet as it happens. For instance, a deadly explosion at a Texas fertilizer plant was caught live on video and posted to social media, as was an enormous explosion that rocked the Chinese port of Tianjin. But when social media posts about a catastrophe go viral, the company involved can be in for a struggle.

To avoid getting left behind, companies need to prepare for how they will communicate using social media when a catastrophe strikes. A company that plans ahead and is able to mount a robust response may not only salvage its reputation, but may actually enhance its public image if it is seen as managing a difficult situation well. Because many companies lack this kind of communications expertise, they may want to work with consultants that can help them prepare for a disaster and respond appropriately. In addition, they should consider insurance that provides coverage for experienced public relations catastrophe management services to protect their corporate reputation.

Social Media Plays a Crucial Role in a Crisis

When it comes to disasters, mobile apps and social media are seen by the public as crucial ways to get information, according to a Red Cross survey. During Superstorm Sandy in 2012, social media played a significant role in providing official information and combating rumors. When Cyclone Tasha struck Australia in 2010, the Queensland Police Service made extensive use of Twitter to provide information to people spread over a vast area.

Social media, however, is widespread and public information, which means that if there is an explosion, fire, or other disaster, chances are someone may be streaming it live to the Internet, tweeting about it, posting it to Facebook or uploading pictures to Instagram even before the affected company is aware of it. In essence, that means public opinion about the incident, as well as the company involved, is already being shaped, possibly without any direction from corporate communications.

Because information travels so quickly through social media, the public no longer has to wait for the evening news to receive the most up-to-date information. Therefore, companies are not afforded the luxury of time to gather all available facts before addressing the public. Traditional media and news organizations are also feeling an increased amount of pressure. Since social media has enabled news to travel quicker, stories may not receive the same level of scrutiny as they once did. That leaves plenty of opportunity for the spread of misinformation, which can be very difficult to counteract. On the Internet, inaccurate information may persist long after it has been thoroughly discredited elsewhere.

Embrace Social Media in Crisis Communications

To handle the social media aspect of a crisis, companies need to be able to act immediately or risk allowing reporters and “citizen journalists” to tell the story they want to tell, which may not provide a complete and accurate picture. Being unprepared can lead to inconsistent messaging, or even misstatements that may create confusion and ultimately damage a corporation’s reputation. A company that is seen as clumsy in its media response to a crisis risks losing credibility.

See Also: Should Social Media Have a Place?

When a disaster is handled well – by providing the public with timely and accurate information as well as proper reassurances about its products and services – an organization can actually bolster its reputation. While social media accelerates the media cycle, it can also enable a company to take control of its image by acting as a primary and reliable source of information when a catastrophe occurs. This requires planning and preparation.

An initial step is to review the corporate crisis communication plan to understand its limits in social media. A traditional crisis plan provides for one-way, controlled communication through prepared statements, press conferences, marketing tools, and commercials.

Such an approach is likely to be viewed as unresponsive by the public seeking immediate information. Incorporating social media into the traditional plan provides for two-way communication that allows for debate, insight, and opposing viewpoints that can guide the company’s responses.

The social media plan, however, should remain consistent with the company’s traditional media efforts. The company should provide consistent messaging in both traditional and social media about its culture and philosophy, the actions it is taking and the expected results, and its concern for those who have been affected.

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Develop a Detailed Social Media Plan

The plan should delineate the policies and procedures to be followed in the event of a catastrophe, and – most importantly – assign roles and responsibilities to specific staff. This ensures that someone who understands the company’s message will maintain control, which can help lessen potential mistakes. Both external and internal policies should be covered so that the information communicated to and among employees and the public is timely, accurate and consistent.

The written policy should detail the information to be provided – for instance – pre-vetted information about the company and its corporate philosophy. It should establish guidelines pertaining to the types of social media posts that necessitate a response. Not every
post merits a reply. Anyone who uses a computer or smartphone can post information to the Internet. Identifying legitimate posts and inquiries and providing necessary information can help preserve a company’s reputation.

Because the social media landscape is dynamic, companies shouldn’t limit themselves to just one outlet, but rather those that are most appropriate for the business, the audience and the geographic region. If an incident occurs abroad, companies should use the
social media outlet most appropriate for that region. With their massive user base, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are obvious choices for domestic and international audiences. Others such as Instagram, Snapchat and Tumblr, should be considered. Companies active in Europe and Russia should consider the social networking site VK.

Prepare the Response

While it may not be possible to prepare material for every potential catastrophe, companies can still organize information ahead of time that can be released as soon as something happens. Information can be prepared for a “dark page” for the corporate website that can be published in the event of an emergency; however, companies should be careful not to publish a “dark page” until a crisis actually occurs.

The site can include background information about the company and its specific businesses as well as the corporate philosophy during times of crisis. Other information might be media contacts and toll-free phone numbers for claims intake. Preparing the information ahead of time makes it possible to have it reviewed by a company’s legal department, public relations, and senior management. Once the page is live, it should be monitored and updated so that it always provides the most current information.

Whether information is prepared ahead of time or developed in response to a particular incident, it should be presented in a way that is accessible for the audience. Written material should be understandable by a wide range of people. Companies should avoid industry jargon and acronyms, which may be unclear or even misunderstood by the general public.

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Monitor and Test

When not in crisis mode, it is helpful for companies to monitor social media. Viewing the social media environment in the normal course of business can help companies ascertain how their brand, products and services are viewed by the public. Companies can purchase monitoring services or build these capabilities in-house.

While monitoring social media is an important part of regular business, it becomes essential after a catastrophe to identify issues that need immediate attention. This helps to ensure that the traditional and social media messages the company is sending are having the desired impact. If the same questions continue to be asked on social media, it’s a clear sign that the message is not getting across.

As part of their overall catastrophe preparation, companies should test their communication response plan to assess their procedures as well as their staff. Testing can help ensure that everyone understands their roles and responsibilities and is able to react quickly. Drills assist in identifying blockages and help address uncertainties in the process. After the test or following an actual event, the company should conduct a thorough reevaluation and debriefing to identify the areas that worked well and those that need improvement.

Preserve the Corporate Reputation

Today, a story about a disaster can be trending on social media even before the company involved is aware of the loss. Organizations that wait too long to respond can cause lasting damage to their reputation. A company that is perceived as avoiding or failing to address a story may soon realize that its lack of response becomes the subject of that story. Undoing the damage caused by a tardy or ill-conceived response can be very difficult.

Many people realize that companies may make mistakes, but how these companies react and the decisions they make when faced with a disaster can potentially lessen confidence among customers and the wider public. Knowing how and when to respond helps project an image of competence and concern. Social media is the fastest way to reach people, project the company’s message and protect its reputation.

To become better prepared, companies have to identify their most likely risks and develop plans to mitigate those exposures, whether they are health, safety or environmental. Companies need to know how best to respond on social media if a disaster were to affect their business. To do so, companies may want to work with consultants that can provide risk analysis and mitigation services and help to prepare a crisis response. In addition, to help plan how they will respond to a crisis on social and traditional media, companies should also consider insurance that can defray the costs of hiring expert help when a disaster strikes. No one knows when a catastrophe may occur, but being prepared can help lessen the damage. Customers will look to these companies for information– companies that can provide that information are more likely to weather a crisis with their reputation unscathed.

Insurance Jobs of the (Near) Future

As the insurance industry continues its slow but steady journey into a digital future, the skills required by the insurance workforce of tomorrow will also change. Here is my take on some of the insurance jobs we can expect to see in (I hope) the near future.

Digital Forensic Investigator

It’s happening more and more – fraudsters submit an insurance claim only to have it thrown out because someone’s discovered footage showing the whole thing was staged. My two favorite examples of recent times are the pregnant woman case and the Bugatti Veyron case. With more of our lives shared online, it’s easy for insurers to check our digital alibis, and digital forensic investigators (basically people who get paid for trawling social media) are the mechanism to do this.

Cyber Actuary

Cyber insurance is becoming a must have for corporations, but it won’t be long until it becomes a must have for individuals, as well. To effectively price this insurance, a new breed of digital natives with actuarial skills will be required to work out the risk and loss associated with a personal hack of your Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn and email accounts.

Drone Pilot

If you’re currently working as an insurance assessor, I recommend you start learning how to fly a drone. On any given day in the future, you could have five drones at your command, each one automatically programmed with a flight path of claim sites to visit. As each drone arrives on site, you take manual control to get a good look with the on-board camera. Same job, but no more climbing roofs or visiting wreckers.

Telemedicine Nurse

Panel doctors beware! Five years from now, most medical examinations will be done at your local “telemedicine booth,” where you’ll self-assess using the same tools a doctor would use. A live telemedicine nurse, located anywhere in the world, will be on a video conference screen located in the booth to guide you through any tricky parts and to verify that it’s actually you taking the tests.

Internet of Things Solution Architect

It’s already possible to control many Internet-connected things in your home – televisions, fridges, air-conditioners, door locks, lamps and pet food dispensers – using smart phone apps. So, in theory, it should also be possible for these devices to notify you when they’ve been stolen (televisions), had food spoil because of a power failure (fridges) or been broken into (door locks), or when a pet stops eating and falls ill (pet food dispensers) – all of which are also insurable events. The challenge for IOT solution architects is to take the data and use it to trigger automated claim applications and approvals. It’s an exciting (though less private) future.

Have we missed anything?

These are just a few of the jobs that insurers can expect to start recruiting for shortly, if they haven’t already. Do you agree? Have we missed anything? Please comment below!

Why Millennials Are the Best Workers

It has become fashionable to trash Millennials. They lack a strong work ethic, have no grit, aren’t respectful or patient and definitely don’t understand corporate culture. The trashing fits with how people romanticize the 1950s as the golden age of American culture, when everything was just somehow better.

I don’t know whether Gen X is just irritated that they’re getting older or whether people are forming their opinions solely based on Buzzfeed, but I think the stereotype is wrong - dead wrong. In fact, I will go out on a limb and state that Millennials may actually be the best generation of workers we’ve ever seen.

And I say this having hired hundreds of new college grads – and seasoned professionals – over the past 20 years. Here’s why:

1. They’re too big for their britches.

Today’s young job seekers have grown up with a startup mentality. The value of embracing failure has been etched into their psyche by entrepreneurs and tech titans like Steve Jobs and Elon Musk. So, unlike past generations, they are not necessarily looking for stability. They don’t dream of landing a job at GM or IBM. They approach positions with the understanding that they may have to put in 110% to succeed, even with the near certainty that their employer won’t be around five years from now.

Put that in contrast to the stigma of entitlement attached to Millennials. It’s true that many baby boomer parents have raised them with a perspective of possibility. They’ve been encouraged to follow their dreams and passions. And from watching Mark Zuckerberg or President Obama, they’ve learned first-hand that it’s not just dogma; anything really is possible.

So where some see entitlement, I see greater authenticity and audacity.

Millennials will shoot for the stars – and if they fall down, they’ll get right back up and try a different way.

2. They just don’t communicate the way you do.

If you’ve watched “Mad Men,” you’ve seen the fast-paced advertising world struggle to become more connected with innovations like… the speaker phone. Fast forward to today, where first-time job seekers not only understand and embrace collaborative technologies but don’t know anything different.

While many offices struggle to get their workforce to embrace services like Yammer or Basecamp, Millennials have been doing those things for years. They’ve been learning with social classroom tools and chatting on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram every waking hour. As a result, they actually conceive of communication in a one-to-many paradigm, which is a huge plus for companies that are spread out globally and interact primarily in a virtual environment.

3. They expect things to happen instantly.

I don’t know anyone over the age of 50 who doesn’t complain about how fast the world is moving these days. However, in the case of job performance, that’s a very very good thing. Think about it. Thirty years ago, everything took a lot more time. The data you needed to make critical business decisions was delivered weeks later by a mail truck. Someone had to physically be sitting in a predetermined location at the right time for you to call on the phone.

Our expectations for accomplishing tasks were, naturally, based on the resources and structures we had in place. Simply put, we moved much slower. And, God bless them, there are many professionals out there who still work the same way.

Not Millennial workers. With the pace of news, communication and responsiveness nearly instant, that’s how they approach work. They know nothing else. Plus, they have the necessary tools to support them. Give a Millennial employee a research assignment on your competitors, and you’ll get the project back in 24 hours. Twenty years ago, the same project might have taken a month. One piece of advice: Just make sure you attach a deadline to the assignment.

4. They expect too much.

Studies show that young job seekers today are passionate about how their jobs affect the world. In fact, they value job fulfillment over monetary reward. Many balk at the traditional model of doing charitable good only when you have reached a certain level of economic wealth or solely in your free time. They want to reach financial well-being and achieve social good simultaneously .

What does that mean for employers? I would hope it could open the doors to two things. First, we have the ability to retain skilled and valuable Millennial workers by creating environments where social impact is lauded. That will reduce employee turnover and save companies thousands of dollars each year in recruiting, hiring and lost productivity.

More important, Millennials are a driving force toward significant, scalable and lasting social change that will benefit everyone, whether it’s about the environment, socioeconomic diversity or just a healthier work-life balance. In case you’ve forgotten, the U.S. ranks the worst among all modern economies in vacation time and pay.

5. They think differently from you.

Millennials are the most diverse generation in U.S. history. Minorities, roughly a third of the U.S. population today, are expected to become the majority by 2042. So Millennials don’t just embrace diversity on the job; they expect it.

From race and religion to gender and sexuality, they’ve come of age with a greater comfort of multiplicity of all kinds. They’ve entered adulthood with an African-American president and been the catalyst for many states legalizing same-sex marriage. Female leaders like Hillary Clinton and Sheryl Sandberg have shaped their views on gender equality.

Imagine how that translates in the workplace. The payoffs touch every single area of a business by opening the doors to increased creativity, agility and productivity, new attitudes and language skills, a more global understanding, new solutions to difficult problems, stronger customer and community loyalty and improved employee recruitment and retention.

6. They are obsessed with technology.

Today even the industries that historically have been slow to innovate are finally adopting a web- and mobile-first philosophy. Century-old brick-and-mortar stores are fighting to keep Amazon at bay; healthcare finds itself transformed by the Affordable Care Act. Job seekers with coding and programming skills from Java to Ruby to SQL are desperately needed at all types of companies right now. Big data analytics, video game design, app development, software architecture – the list goes on and on for highly sought Millennial workers with tech expertise. But the issue isn’t just about the hard skills they bring.

If you’ve spent any time with a child lately, you’ve probably noticed that they can master an iPad within minutes. It’s mind-blowing – and a little frightening – to imagine how future generations of consumers will interact with technology.

Millennial workers are the bridge to that future, through social media, mobile, the cloud and other real-time technologies that haven’t even been invented yet. They are graduating with both academic skills and innate behavioral skills that companies will need to engage with customers in much more meaningful (and profitable) ways.

It’s the way Millennials think about technology, and their relationship with it, that is changing everything. So, having Millennial employees on staff to advise on your customer relations strategy or spearhead innovative new mobile and social media programs is invaluable for any business of any size, place or industry.

No Vaccine for Social Media Theft

Whether you are new to college, single and dating or newly divorced (because you panicked and confessed when news of the Ashley Madison hack hit the media), I’ll bet there is at least one socially transmitted disease you haven’t started worrying about: identity theft.

If you use Facebook, you’re making easy work for identity thieves. The same goes for the whole cosmos of social media whether you favor Twitter, Instagram, Reddit, Pinterest, YouTube or LinkedIn or prefer to Tumblr your thoughts, preferences and predilections to anyone who cares to know what they are. The more you put out there in publicly viewable spaces, the more your personal identity mosaic is exposed. An identity thief’s day job is piecing together that mosaic into a passable, or usable, version of you: one that will get through the authentication process of financial, medical or governmental organizations.

The echo of another kind of disease here is intentional. Like the more widely known kind of STD, the socially transmitted diseases that fall under the rubric of identity-related crimes are contracted by unsafe personal information practices. Unlike the more familiar variety, where safety is taught in high school, tacked to college community boards and heralded by countless other media new and old, not as many people these days know how to stay as safe as possible from the threat of identity theft, especially online.

How to practice “safe social”:

  1. Don’t overshare. It’s okay to let the world know you’re on vacation so long as you have a great security system at home or you have a house sitter. Traditional trespassers use social media to know when houses are unguarded. It is far better to share the memory than report the experience as it’s unfolding.
  2. Be careful when posting pictures. While it’s fun to brag about a purchase—whether that be a diamond ring, a car or the smartest TV on the market, just be aware that anyone following you now knows where they can get your newest trophy or indulgence for free.
  3. Geotagging is for victims. There is no upside for you here. Companies like geotagging photos and other people-powered media assets because it gives them bankable information that could lead to future sales. Whether you are letting Twitter or Facebook or FourSquare narrowcast (or broadcast, depending on your privacy settings) your location, failure to disable location services on your device permits geotagging, which also gives thieves bankable info that could lead to future crimes.
  4. Know your privacy settings. Make sure you understand how your posts are being displayed or distributed by the social network you use. For instance, on Facebook you can set a post to “Public” or “Only Me,” with many choices in between.
  5. Lying is good. Facebook, especially, is a perfectly acceptable place to not be forthcoming about your age, hometown, place of employment or even the college you attended and what years you were there. Identity thieves comb social sites for information to complete dossiers of personally identifiable information that will allow them to correctly answer security questions and thus open new financial accounts or empty existing ones. If you don’t want to actively fabricate answers to these questions, just don’t fill out those parts of your profile.
  6. Beware of quizzes that require personally identifiable information. Make no mistake, your email address and name count.

There is no immunization

Unlike the other kind of STD, the socially transmitted disease of identity theft is not avoidable. There is no immunization, no safe way to avoid it—not even complete abstinence. There have been too many breaches with too much data for anyone but those living entirely off the grid to be completely safe. (And even still you can’t be sure.)

Your best bet, in my opinion, is a system detailed in my book (forthcoming in November). A key element to that approach is acceptance. Specifically, you need to come to terms with the fact that it’s no longer a question of “if” but “when” you will become a victim of at least one type, if not multiple types, of identity theft. Anyone who tells you that they can keep you from getting got is selling snake oil. In fact, they are running afoul of the Federal Trade Commission. There is no guarantee. There are, however, best practices.

THE THREE M’S

If you accept the basic premise that you are at risk for identity theft no matter what you do, here are some thoughts as to how you might stay as safe as possible. The good news may actually be that you are a seasoned and intelligent user of social media, because that means you already have several of the habits in place that you will need.

Minimize your exposure

The same strategies you can adopt to make yourself a harder-to-hit target on social media go for the rest of your life. Whether that means saying “no” when asked for your Social Security number, limiting the amount of sensitive personal information you provide to anyone who contacts you, making sure all your accounts (email, social networking, financial or retail) have different user names paired with unique, long and strong passwords, properly securing your computers and mobile devices or freezing your credit—there are a variety of things you can do to make your attackable surface smaller.

Monitor your accounts

If you use social media regularly, you are used to checking in on a regular basis—the Pew Research Center found that 70% of Facebook users check in daily, as did about half of Instagram users, and nearly 40% of Tweeps. The same behavior, applied to your financial life, may keep you from getting got … or help you undo or minimize the damage in case you do. Check your bank and credit card accounts daily. Other things you can do include signing up for free transactional monitoring alerts at your bank, credit union or credit card provider, or purchasing more sophisticated credit and noncredit monitoring programs.

Manage the damage

When the dark day comes that your daily practice of monitoring your credit or financial life yields a compromise, you need to get on it immediately by informing the institution of the account that is involved, as well as law enforcement and the fraud department of at least one credit reporting agency. Because many insurance companies, a number of financial services organizations and the human resources departments at a number of companies offer complimentary or low-cost identity theft assistance as a perk of your relationship with the institution, check to see if you are covered or, if not, how you can get covered. Resolution experts can greatly help you speed your way back to normalcy.

Identity theft is a permanent threat. The best way to stay safe is to change your behavior. The above tips are only some of the ways to do that. In the age of universal data vulnerability, practicing safe information hygiene is a must—lest you contract the one STD that may haunt you for the rest of your life.

#InsuranceMarketing: How to Use Hashtags

The hashtag phenomenon dates back to 2007, when Twitter launched a tool that allowed users to search and share topics by using the # symbol. Since then, the symbol has gone mainstream, and you will commonly find it in other social media sites, such as Instagram and Vine.

Insurance companies caught on to the trend and incorporated hashtags into their digital strategies, adding humor, wordplay and aspirational connotations.

Insurance Entertainment benchmarked seven hashtags used by insurance companies to provide some insight into how hashtags can be best used:

#DreamFearlessly by American Family

#ThinkSafe by Travelers

#SummerIsMayhem by Allstate

#MakeSafeHappen by Nationwide

#BeTheJake by State Farm

#InFlovation by Progressive

#GeckoPhilosophy by Geico

The hashtags fall into two categories: 1) branded hashtags, which refer to the brand directly or indirectly (e.g. #InFlovation), and 2) interest-based hashtags, which speak to shared topics (e.g. #ThinkSafe). Some companies use Twitter to position themselves as aspirational brands by building communities around shared values.

Here’s the bird’s-eye-view of who’s doing what and why:

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Geico and Progressive, for example, opt for “branded hashtags,” while American Family and Nationwide promote “interest-based hashtags” in an attempt to target like-minded individuals.

7. Geico – #GeckoPhilosophy

Twitter: @GEICO, @TheGEICOGecko, Hashtag: #GeckoPhilosophy

#InspirationalQuotes are abundant, shareable and, generally speaking, positive. Geico took notice and added the Gecko flavor to its version of inspirational quotes, forming what is known as the #GeckoPhilosophy. Geico gets an A for creativity but a C for execution, as the tweets are often dull on screen. The idea has merit and is an example of a branded hashtag, tailored to the audience on social media, which in the long run may see more pickup by users.

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6. Progressive – #InFlovation

Twitter: @Progressive, @ItsFlo, Hashtag: #InFlovation

#InFlovation is Progressive’s playful take on innovation and Flo.

Similar to Geico’s #GeckoPhilosophy, it’s a branded hashtag targeting those who enjoy interaction with Flo. By the way, at this time, Flo does not make public appearances. Someone asked. Progressive answered.

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5. State Farm – #BeTheJake

Twitter: @StateFarm, @JakeStateFarm, Hashtag: #BeTheJake

Another branded hashtag around the real Jake from State Farm.

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4. Nationwide – #MakeSafeHappen

Twitter: @Nationwide, Hashtag: #MakeSafeHappen, Powered by MakeSafeHappen

Nationwide’s marketing team drew some heat for its Super Bowl ad featuring a “dead boy” with the tagline #MakeSafeHappen. But let’s face it, the #1 cause of childhood deaths is preventable accidents, and you know that thanks to Nationwide. So, aside from completely reshuffling its marketing team, the company “stands behind the commercial and the message.”

Since then, #MakeSafeHappen has taken a less controversial route, but not without consequences: MakeSafeHappen.com desktop traffic tumbled to an all-time low of approximately 1,000 monthly visits compared with 85,000 when the ad premiered. Better safe than sorry?

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3. Allstate – #SummerIsMayhem

Twitter:@Allstate, @Mayhem, Hashtag: #SummerIsMayhem

Mayhem is the third most-recognized insurance advertising character, behind the Geico gecko and Flo. With more than 79,000 Twitter followers for @Mayhem compared with about 61,000 for @Allstate, it is obvious why Mayhem’s dark humor is an integral part of Allstate’s digital strategy.

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2. Travelers – #ThinkSafe

Twitter: @Travelers, Hashtag: #ThinkSafe

Surprise. An insurance company posting safety tips.

There is actually more to this strategy than meets the eye. Aside from its relevant and practical content, albeit dry at times, Travelers is also looking out for its independent agents by producing content they can easily share. Travelers gets an A for thoughtfulness, an F for entertainment.

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1. American Family – #DreamFearlessly

Twitter: @amfam, Hashtag: #DreamFearlessly powered by DreamFearlessly

American Family has one of the best brand extensions an insurance company can hope for. In the land of cost savings by Geico, price comparison by Progressive and 3:00am customer service by State Farm, nothing says different like American Family. A slogan turned interest-based hashtag, #DreamFearlessly is a branding initiative that allows American Family to move away from functional attributes and create an aspirational brand.

There is one caveat, though – which is true of all interest-based hashtags. They are not exclusive. While they do generate more reach, sometimes the tweets have very little to do with the insurance brand seeking to be associated with that message. So while #InFlovation offers a direct association to Progressive, interest-based hashtags such as #ThinkSafe, #MakeSafeHappen and #DreamFearlessly require a bigger marketing push. The outcome, once successful, is worth it.

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As the graph below shows, in the last 30 days #DreamFearlessly enjoyed more than 10X the reach of #GeckoPhilosophy. Clearly, Americans love to dream.

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In sum, hashtags are only as great as one’s offline strategy (American Family, Travelers); there is no harm in plain fun (Progressive, Geico, State Farm); and never underestimate the size of the fight in the dog (Nationwide). After all, there are no low talkers on social media.

Bottom Line: In a zero-sum game, the score is American Family (1), Geico (-1).