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5 Transformational Changes for Clients

In January 1993, I began preaching the Gospel of Change – its management and architecture.

One of my first presentations was to a very successful community bank’s senior management team. I said, “Today, General Motors, Sears and IBM are kings of their respective jungles. I believe in my lifetime (I was 46 at the time) one of these companies will go bankrupt!” The audience rolled their collective eyes! In 16 years, I was vindicated.

GM filed for Chapter 11 reorganization in the Manhattan New York federal bankruptcy court on June 1, 2009. The filing reported $82.29 billion in assets and $172.81 billion in debt.

Then, Sears filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Oct. 15, 2018, with $6.9 billion of assets and $11.3 billion of debts, after a decade-plus as a train wreck in slow motion.

See also: How to Earn Consumers’ Trust  

Today, I’m not going to scare you into change – I’ll merely shine a spot light on the changes that are already occurring in the world and you decide if these innovations are friends or foes. Don’t ask what threats these changes mean for you. Ask instead what these changes mean to the marketplace – to each of us as consumers. The consumer is king, and now consumers shop in a global marketplace – when, where and how they want. Below are five transformational changes that are affecting the world for your clients and you–and a word of hope.

Generational Change: Many of us grew up in a “Father Knows Best” world. Today, the universe is more similar to a “Modern Family.”

Look at the demographics. The youngest members of the Greatest or Silent generation are nearing 75. The youngest members of the Baby Boomers are in their mid-50s. The youngest Gen Xers are in their mid-30s. And the youngest millennials are already 15.

As Paul Harvey said often, “We’re not one world.” He was so right. In terms of marketing reality – One size does not fit all.

Big Data and Artificial Intelligence: Yesterday, I opened an e-mail offering me a “deal” on a new Toyota. Within an hour, I had received similar e-mails from most other brands that I might be interested in. Big Brother (or Big Sister) is watching everything we do. Now, sophisticated sellers can anticipate your needs and be first to market with a solution for each need. Can you do this?

Global Marketplace/Virtual Marketplace: As a consumer, you can buy anything you want, wherever you want. As a seller, your competitors are not down the street – they are everywhere.

Language/Diversity: Robert Young as Jim Anderson in “Father Knows Best” was an insurance agent and also an OWGIC (Old White Guy in Charge). Today, ours is a much more diverse and multilingual world. Everyone can be in charge of their own world. Do you speak enough languages to serve this marketplace? Who is/will be your marketplace (Hispanic, Laotian, Muslim, etc.)? Remember that many “youn-‘uns” communicate very differently. If you don’t believe me, call a teen and see she answers. Text, and she will.

Innovation of Products/Services/Competitors: What, where and how you sell has no meaning. What, where and how people buy is all that matters. Remember social media, robotic surgery, driverless cars, Amazon, Expedia, Uber, Google, AirBnB: Innovations change options and in some cases bankrupt organizations and industries that are fat, dumb and happy.

See also: Why More Don’t Go Direct-to-Consumer  

Your Hope/Opportunity:

John Naisbitt developed the concept of high tech, high touch in his 1982 bestseller “Megatrends.” He theorized that, in a world of technology, people long for personal, human contact.

He was so right. Become client-defined and client-driven. Develop client intimacy. Be engaged with the people and markets you serve. Don’t sell them; facilitate their buying. Be a concierge, a friend, a shoulder to cry on and voice of encouragement. Build intimacy – be a professional, expert, trusted resource.

How to Use AI in Claims Management

How do you increase quality in claims assessment, management and administration? We share insights into an end-to-end, AI-powered, claims-automation approach to increase quality, improve processing efficiency and reduce cost.

In this blog series, I’ve spoken about how AI increases process efficiency, reduces costs and helps business solve problems. I also showed how it enables smart business transformation by creating intelligent processes at every step along the value chain and intelligent products and services in the market.

In my previous post, I illustrated how insurers can use AI-related technologies in underwriting and service management. Now, I’ll explain how AI helps insurers to manage claims more effectively and efficiently.

How can insurers use AI in claims management?

AI technologies make information systems more adaptive to humans and improve the interaction between humans and computer systems. By doing this, AI gives insurers an edge on how they manage claims—faster, better and with fewer errors. Insurers can achieve better claims management by using the intelligent technologies in some of the following ways:

  • To enable a real-time question-and-answer service for first notice of loss;
  • To pre-assess claims and to automate damage evaluation;
  • To enable automated claims fraud detection using enriched data analytics;
  • To predict claim volume patterns;
  • To augment loss analysis

What are the benefits of using AI for claims management?

In our  2017 Technology Vision for Insurance , we highlighted how Fukoku Mutual Life Insurance in Japan is using the IBM Watson Explorer AI platform to classify diseases, injuries and surgical procedures as well as to calculate claims payouts.

See also: Insurers: Start Boosting Your ‘AIQ’  

Our research has shown automated machine classification can be 30% more accurate than manual classification by humans and has the potential to increase productivity by 80%. AI-related technologies can enable higher quality in claims assessment, management and administration. It also supports improving the predictability of reserves and fraud.

Smart machines can pre-assess claims and automate damage evaluation. Machine learning enables insurers to classify claims via email in the case of an accident or if medical care is required. It’s fast, accurate, efficient and simple to use.

Case Study 1: Cognitive health insurance claims process management

We have conducted a pilot with one of our insurance clients on the application of AI to its health insurance claims processes. This insurer’s health claims management process took about 11.5 minutes from receipt of the claim to updating it and closing the record. Scanning the paper documents and uploading them into the portal where they were categorized were the first manual steps. It took roughly five minutes to analyze the data, another five to verify rejection rules and one and a half minutes to accept or reject the claim.

With our machine learning solution in place, a fully automated process was enabled and took only three minutes to do the same amount of work. This represents a 74% reduction in the claims settlement time.

Furthermore, the machine learning technology applied was able to process health claims with 80% accuracy. The other 20% are incorrectly processed owing to spelling errors or database limitations. However, machine learning technologies are able to store and recall those errors for more accurate claims processing in the future.

Case study 2: AI-powered automation of automobile claims processing

Accenture was recently part of a major client initiative to identify technologies and partner for an AI-driven automation journey. We proposed and built a solution to automate processes to extract and classify data from commercial automobile claims PDF documents.

The client faced many challenges, including having fewer than 400 records to classify 55 unique cases, and these records were mismatched and labeled inconsistently. The client also received scanned images containing text, owing to the redaction process followed to ensure data privacy.

We developed an on-premise solution using a combination of IBM offerings and open-source technologies that enabled a detailed analysis of training data. The solution also helped the client to identify quality and sparse/skew data and to test various approaches to maximize performance.

In the end, a blind data set of 207 claims documents was processed within a four-hour assessment window, and we were able to process claims PDF documents with scanned images as well as text, including several formats and layouts not part of training data.

See also: How to Use AI, Starting With Distribution  

We identified several pain points in the current claims management process:

  • Error-prone manual data extraction;
  • Inconsistent claim classification;
  • The need for additional downstream validation;
  • Increased time and cost for processing and resolution.

Solution proposed:

In the next post, I’ll look at how AI-related technology can be used to improve customer services and policy administration. Get in touch to find out how you can use AI in the entire insurance value chain, or download the How to boost your AIQ report.

Keys to Loyalty for P&C Customers

In a rapidly changing industry, some P&C insurers are pulling ahead of their competitors by focusing on customer satisfaction and retention.

“The insurance industry as we know it is at the edge of a new business environment,” says  Michael Costonis , head of Accenture’s global insurance practice. “Breaking away from the pack and capturing new revenue opportunities requires a shift in business mindset – a shift from product-focused to customer-focused.”

Customers want extra benefits, and one way to provide them is to offer value-added services. Travel companies and other insurance branches are already exploring the benefits of value-added services for retaining customers, as  Jamie Biesiada  at Travel Weekly points out. Because P&C insurers have been slower to adopt this strategy, however, many opportunities for capitalizing on this strategy remain.

Here, we look at some of the most popular value-added services in P&C insurance, which of these services focus on building loyalty and how to create the right service offerings or packages to encourage your customers to stay with your company in the long term.

Value-Added Services: The State of the Industry

For many years, P&C insurers have struggled with the challenge of selling a product that is substantially similar to their competitors’ products. “Because customers don’t discern much difference between insurers, companies end up competing largely on price,” write Bain & Co. partners Henrik Naujoks, Harshveer Singh and Darci Darnell . A downward spiral occurs, in which costs and profits are cut and customers jump ship the moment they see the same coverage for a few dollars less.

See also: How to Build Customer Loyalty in Insurance  

When insurers compete on price, customers do what Brandon Carter at Access calls the services shuffle: quitting or threatening to quit their insurance providers to access the same price-lean deals that new customers receive. “My goal is to pay less in a system that actually punishes people for being loyal customers,” Carter explains. Focusing on cost decimates loyalty. Focusing on value can boost it.

Yet insurance companies aren’t making value-added services their first choice when it comes to customer retention  Tom Super, director of the P&C insurance practice at J.D. Power, adds that many P&C insurers are turning to digital tools to court customers, particularly in the auto insurance business.

But digital technology is only a tool. The insurers that will stay ahead of their competitors in the race for customer retention and loyalty are the ones that best leverage that tool to provide the value customers want, says Mikaela Parrick  at Brown & Joseph.

Which Value-Added Services Boost Customer Loyalty?

Value-added services provide an extra benefit that enhances the core product or service. This additional service may be offered at little or no cost for the customer, yet it may make both the customer’s and the insurer’s work easier.

Connecting experience-based services to the product and brand can be a powerful way to encourage loyalty, adds Roman Martynenko , the founder and global executive vice president at Astound Commerce. While this approach is most commonly seen in retail, P&C insurers can adapt it to their needs. A top-of-the-line mobile app or a personalized starter kit featuring smart tools for each customer’s home can make customers feel like they’re part of a family.

Unique, innovative or specially tailored value-added services can also help encourage loyalty and boost customer interest by becoming a cornerstone of an insurance company’s brand.

Value-added services don’t have to be expensive or complex, suggests Mike McGee of Investment Insurance Consultants. For instance, a disaster preparation email sent at the start of tornado or hurricane season can help customers take loss-prevention steps, address safety and feel supported by their insurer, at very little cost to the insurance company.

Partnering with other companies can boost loyalty for both organizations while providing value-added services that attract customers, digital transformation executive Fuad Butt says on the IBM insurance industry blog. For instance, working with telecommunications providers to offer reduced-rate packages can help both companies succeed.

A highly specific partnership that uses existing technology to add value for both customers and companies is the recently announced alliance between Hyundai Motor America and data analytics firm Verisk.

“Hyundai customers will have access to their portable Verisk driving score, which can lead to discount offers on UBI programs and support driver feedback that helps improve their driving,” says  Manish Mehrotra , director of digital business planning and connected operations for Hyundai Motor America. A similar arrangement through an auto insurer can help both insurers and drivers have access to more information to improve safety and make better choices.

Choosing and Implementing Value-Added Services in P&C Insurance

The changing landscape of insurance offers one significant advantage to companies seeking to improve their value-added services: access to data about why customers remain loyal.

“The connections that enable excellent customer experiences aren’t always easy to make,” says Chris Hall of Pitney-Bowes. Siloing fragments customer information, leaving staff without a complete picture of each customer. This fragmentation makes it difficult to determine which value-added services will actually pique customers’ interest.

If data access is an issue, start by de-siloing information to get a better sense of each customer. Then, find the services that best support your organization’s key differences from your competitors.

Kirk Ford , compliance and T&C manager at RWA Business, suggests first considering how you’d like your clients and customers to perceive your brand in relation to competitors. Balance your differences against your similarities so that customers see they’ll receive all the services they need, but with the value-added extras that make their relationship with this particular insurance company meaningful.

See also: The Future of P&C Distribution  

However your insurance organization chooses to add value, resist the urge to announce it to customers merely as being higher-quality. “It doesn’t matter whether or not a company can pull off quality or exceptional service because quality and customer service rarely are differentiating strategies,” adds  Mac McIntire , president of the Innovative Management Group.

Instead,  Ryan Hanley  formerly of Agency Nation, now at Bold Penguin, recommends finding ways your value-added services can improve customer lives. When customers feel a sense of shared values, they’re more likely to stick with their insurance company, rather than risk their luck with a company that may not share those values—even if the prices are lower.

One way to connect with customer values is to change your company’s language surrounding insurance. “If you can sell insurance and not talk about insurance, it’s a win-win,” says  Rusty Sproat , founder of Figo Pet Insurance. He notes that many customers find insurance language obscure and frustrating. That’s why Sproat’s company focuses on providing quality information on pet care and health, switching the conversation to insurance only when necessary to complete a transaction.

Finally, don’t shy away from technology—but use it as a tool rather than a cure-all. Smart home sensors, telemetrics for vehicles and other tech tools are increasingly common in U.S. households, plus they can greatly improve the customer experience, says  Ramaswamy Tanjore  at Mindtree. Consider the best ways to manage telemetric or other data, as well as how to position these tools to best showcase their value to loyal customers.

In Age of Disruption, What Is Insurance?

“Somehow we have created a monster, and it’s time to turn it on its head for our customers and think about providing some certainty of protection.” – Inga Beale, CEO, Lloyds of London

In an early-morning plenary session at this year’s InsureTech Connect in Las Vegas, Rick Chavez, partner and head of digital strategy acceleration at Oliver Wyman, described the disruption landscape in insurance succinctly: while the first phase of disruption was about digitization, the next phase will be about people. In his words, “digitization has shifted the balance of power to people,” forcing the insurance industry to radically reorient itself away from solving its own problems toward solving the problems of its customer. It’s about time.

For the 6,000-plus attendees at InsureTech Connect 2018, disruption in insurance has long been described in terms of technology. Chavez rightly urged the audience to expand its definition of disruption and instead conceive of disruption not just as a shift in technology but as a “collision of megatrends”–technological, behavioral and societal–that is reordering the world in which we live, work and operate as businesses. In this new world order, businesses and whole industries are being refashioned in ways that look entirely unfamiliar, insurance included.

This kind of disruption requires that insurance undergo far more than modernization, but a true metamorphosis, not simply shedding its skin of bureaucracy, paper applications and legacy systems but being reborn as an entirely new animal, focused on customers and digitally enabled by continuing technological transformation.

In the new age of disruption …

1. Insurance is data

“Soon each one of us will be generating millions of data sets every day – insurance can be the biggest beneficiary of that” – Vishal Gondal, GOQUii

While Amazon disrupted the way we shop, and Netflix disrupted the way we watch movies, at the end of the day (as Andy G. Simpson pointed out in his Insurance Journal recap of the conference) movies are still movies, and the dish soap, vinyl records and dog food we buy maintain their inherent properties, whether we buy them on Amazon or elsewhere. Insurance, not simply as an industry but as a product, on the other hand is being fundamentally altered by big data.

At its core, “insurance is about using statistics to price risk, which is why data, properly collected and used, can transform the core of the product,” said Daniel Schreiber, CEO of Lemonade, during his plenary session on day 2 of the conference. As copious amounts of data about each and every one of us become ever more available, insurance at the product level– at the dish soap/dog food level–is changing.

While the auto insurance industry has been ahead of the curve in its use of IoT-generated data to underwrite auto policies, some of the most exciting change happening today is in life insurance, as life products are being reconceived by a boon of health data generated by FitBits, genetic testing data, epigenetics, health gamification and other fitness apps. In a panel discussion titled “On the Bleeding Edge: At the Intersection of Life & Health,” JJ Carroll of Swiss RE discussed the imperative of figuring out how to integrate new data sources into underwriting and how doing so will lead to a paradigm shift in how life insurance is bought and sold. “Right now, we underwrite at a single point in time and treat everyone equally going forward,” she explained. With new data sources influencing underwriting, life insurance has the potential to become a dynamic product that uses health and behavior data to adjust premiums over time, personalize products and service offerings and expand coverage to traditionally riskier populations.

Vishal Gandal of GOQuii, a “personalized wellness engine” that is partnering with Max Bupa Insurance and Swiss Re to offer health coaching and health-management tools to customers, believes that integrating data like that generated by GOQuii will “open up new risk pools and provide products to people who couldn’t be covered before.” While some express concern that access to more data, especially epigenetic and genetic data, may exclude people from coverage, Carroll remains confident that it is not insurers who will benefit the most from data sharing, but customers themselves.

See also: Is Insurance Really Ripe for Disruption?  

2. Insurance is in the background

“In the future, insurance will buy itself automatically” – Jay Bergman

Some of the most standout sessions of this year’s InsureTech Connect were not from insurance companies at all, but from businesses either partnering with insurance companies or using insurance-related data to educate their customers about or sell insurance to their customers as a means of delivering more value.

Before unveiling a new car insurance portal that allows customers to monitor their car-related records and access a quote with little to no data entry, Credit Karma CEO Ken Lin began his talk with a conversation around how Credit Karma is “more than just free credit scores,” elucidating all of the additional services they have layered on top of their core product to deliver more value to their customers. Beyond simply announcing a product launch, Lin’s talk was gospel to insurance carriers, demonstrating how a company with a fairly basic core offering (free credit scores) can build a service layer on top to deepen engagement with customers. It’s a concept that touches on what was surely one of the most profound themes of the conference–that, like free credit scores, insurance only need be a small piece of a company’s larger offering. This may mean embedding insurance into the purchase of other products or services (i.e., how travel insurance is often sold) or it may mean doing what Credit Karma has done and layering on a service offering to deepen engagement with customers and make products stickier.

Assaf Wand, CEO of the home insurance company Hippo, spoke to both of these models in his discussion with David Weschler of Comcast about how their two companies are partnering to make insurance smarter and smart homes safer. When asked about what the future of insurance looks like, Wand put it plainly when he said: “Home insurance won’t be sold as insurance. It will be an embedded feature of the smart home.” Jillian Slyfield, who heads the digital economy practice at Aon, a company that is already partnering with companies like Uber and Clutch to insure the next generation of drivers, agrees: “We are embedding insurance into these products today.”

Until this vision is fully realized, companies like Hippo are doing their part to make their insurance products fade into the background as the companies offer additional services for homeowners, “Can I bring you value that you really care about?” Wand asked, “Wintering your home, raking leaves, these are the kinds of things that matter to homeowners.”

3. Insurance is first and foremost a customer experience

“The insurance industry has to redefine our processes… go in reverse, starting with the customer and re-streamlining our processes around them” – Koichi Nagasaki, Sompo

To many outside the insurance industry, the idea of good customer experience may seem unremarkable, but for an industry that has for so long been enamored by the ever-increasing complexity of its own products, redefining processes around customers is like learning a foreign language as a middle-aged adult. It’s hard, and it takes a long time, and a lot of people aren’t up to the task.

The insurance industry has been talking about the need for customer-centricity for a while now, but many companies continue to drag their feet. But customer-centricity is and remains more than a differentiator. It’s now table stakes. How this plays out for the industry will look different for different companies. Some will turn to partnerships with insurtechs and other startups to embed their products into what are already customer-centric experiences and companies. Chavez of Oliver Wyman would rather see the industry “disrupt itself,” as he believes it’s critical that companies maintain the customer relationship. In his plenary sessions, he cited the German energy company Enercity as a company that disrupted itself. Operating in a similarly regulated industry, rather than becoming just a supplier of energy, the company invested heavily in its own digital strategy to become a thought leader in the energy space, to be a trusted adviser to its customer and to deliver an exceptional digital experience that, among other things, leverages blockchain technology to accept bitcoin payments from customers. For Chavez, insurtech is already a bubble, and, “If you want to succeed and thrive in a bubble, make yourself indispensable.” The only way to do this, he believes, is to maintain ownership over the customer experience, because, in today’s digital economy, the customer experience is the product.

But to own the customer experience and succeed will require insurance companies to completely reorient their business practices and processes – to start with the customer and the experience and work backward toward capabilities. In the words of Han Wang of Paladin Cyber, who spoke on a panel about moving from selling products to selling services, “It’s always a questions of what does the customer want? How do they define the problem? And what is the solution?”

4. Insurance is trust

“The world runs on trust. When we live in a society where we have lots of trust, everyone benefits. When this trust goes away, everyone loses.” – Dan Ariely, Lemonade

During a faceoff between incumbents and insurtechs during one conference session, Dylan Bourguignon, CEO of so-sure cinched the debate with a single comment, calling out large insurance carriers: “You want to engage with customers, yet you don’t have their trust. And it’s not like you haven’t had time to earn it.” This, Bourguignon believes, is ultimately why insurtechs will beat the incumbents.

Indeed, the insurtech Lemonade spent a fair amount of stage time preaching the gospel of trust. Dan Ariely, behavioral economist and chief behavior officer at Lemonade, delivered a plenary session entirely devoted to the topic of trust. He spoke about trust from a behavioral standpoint, explaining how trust creates equilibrium in society and how, when trust is violated, the equilibrium is thrown off. Case in point: insurance.

Insurance, he explained, has violated consumer trust and has thrown off the equilibrium–the industry doesn’t trust consumers, and consumers don’t trust the industry, a vulnerability that has left the insurance industry open to the kind of disruption a company like Lemonade poses. As an industry, insurance has incentives not to do the thing it has promised to do, which is to pay out your claims. And while trust is scarcely more important in any industry as it is in insurance, save in an industry like healthcare, the insurance industry is notoriously plagued by two-way distrust.

What makes Lemonade stand out is that it has devised a system that removes the conflict of interest germane to most insurance companies – as a company, it has no incentives to not pay out customer claims. In theory, profits are entirely derived by taking a percentage of the premium; anything left over that does not go to pay out a claim is then donated to charity. The result: If customers are cheating, they aren’t cheating a company, they are cheating a charity. Ariely described several instances where customer even tried to return their claims payments after finding misplaced items they thought had been stolen. “How often does this happen in your companies?” he asked the audience. Silence.

And it’s not just new business models that will remedy the trust issues plaguing insurance. It’s new technology, too. In a panel titled “Blockchain: Building Trust in Insurance,” executives from IBM, Salesforce, Marsh and AAIS discussed how blockchain technology has the capacity to deepen trust across the industry, among customers, carriers, solutions providers and underwriters by providing what Jeff To of Salesforce calls an “immutable source of truth that is trusted among all parties.” Being able to easily access and trust data will have a trickle down effect that will affect everyone, including customers, employees and the larger business as a whole–reducing inefficiencies, increasing application and quote-to-bind speed, eliminating all the hours and money that go into data reconciliation and ultimately making it easier for carriers to deliver a quality customer experience to their customers.

See also: Disruption of Rate-Modeling Process  

While the progress in blockchain has been incremental, the conference panel demoed some promising use cases in which blockchain is already delivering results for customers, one example being acquiring proof of insurance for small businesses or contractors through Marsh’s platform. With blockchain, a process that used to span several days has been reduced to less than a minute. Experiences like these–simple, seamless and instantaneous – are laying the groundwork for carriers to begin the long road to earning back customer trust. Blockchain will likely play an integral role this process.

5. Insurance is a social good

“We need insurance. It is one of the most important products for financial security.” – Dan Ariely, Lemonade

For all of the the naysaying regarding state of the industry that took place at InsureTech Connect, there were plenty of opportunities for the industry to remind itself that it’s not all bad, and its core insurance is something that is incredibly important to the stability of people across the globe. Lemonade’s Schreiber called it a social good, while Ariely told his audience, “We need insurance. It is one of the most important products for financial security.” Similar sentiments were expressed across stages throughout the conference.

In fact, in today’s society, income disparity is at one of the highest points in recent history, stagnating wages are plaguing and diminishing the middle class, more people in the U.S. are living in poverty now than at any point since the Great Depression, the social safety net is shrinking by the minute and more than 40% of Americans don’t have enough money in savings to cover a $400 emergency, so insurance is more important than ever.

For Inga Beale, CEO of Lloyds of London, insurance has a critical role to play in society, “It goes beyond insurance–it’s about giving people money and financial independence,” she said during a fireside chat. She went on to describe findings from recent research conducted by Lloyds, which determined that, by the end of their lives, men in the U.K. are six times better off financially than women. When designed as a tool to provide financial independence and equality for everyone, insurance can play an important role in addressing this disparity. While this has been a focus in emerging markets, financial stability and independence is often assumed in more developed markets, like the U.S. and Europe. In reality, it is a problem facing all markets, and increasingly so. Ace Callwood, CEO of Painless1099, a bank account for freelancers that helps them save money for taxes, agrees that insurance has an important role to play. “It’s our job to get people to a place where they can afford to buy the products we are trying to sell,” he said.

You can find the article originally published here.

The Opportunities in Blockchain

Blockchain and smart contracts have enabled the development of new approaches in the insurance industry, as they begin to replace outdated business models (with excessive paperwork, communication problems, multiple data operating systems and duplication of processes and the inability of syndicates to mine their data). By digitizing payments and assets—thus eliminating tedious paperwork—and facilitating the management of contracts, blockchain and smart contracts can help cut operational costs and improve efficiency. Smart contracts also allow for automation of insurance claims and other processes as well as privacy, security and transparency. It is estimated that roughly one-third of blockchain use cases are in the insurance industry.

How Blockchain Is Used in Insurance

How will blockchain and smart contracts transform the insurance industry?

  • Quick and efficient processing and verification of claims, automatic payments—all in a modular fashion, thus minimizing paperwork.
  • Transparency, minimizing fraud, secure and decentralized transactions, reliable tracking of asset provenance and improving the quality of data used in underwriting. Besides improving efficiency, this also reduces counterparty risks, ensuring trust and safety both from the insurer’s and customer’s perspective. By computing at a network, rather than individual, company level, the consumer is reassured that the process was completed appropriately and as agreed upon. From the perspective of the insurance company, this fosters trust, as well, and encourages consistency, as the blockchain provides transparent and permanent information about the transactions.

The insurance industry has traditionally been associated with tedious administration, paperwork and mistrust; the incorporation of blockchain, however, has the ability to transform this image by bringing operational efficiency, security, and transparency. The long-term strategic benefits of blockchain are thus clear.

Top insurance blockchain projects:

AIG (American International Group) – Smart contract insurance policies

HQ: New York

Description: AIG, in conjunction with IBM, has developed a “smart” insurance policy utilizing blockchain to manage complex international coverage.

Blockchain network: Bitcoin

Deployment: In June 2017, AIG and IBM announced the successful completion of their “smart contract” multinational policy pilot for Standard Chartered Bank. It is said to be the first such policy to employ the blockchain digital ledger technology.

Fidentiax – Marketplace for tradable insurance policies

HQ: Singapore

Description: As “the world’s first marketplace for tradable insurance policies,” Fidentiax hopes to establish a trading marketplace and repository of insurance policies for the masses through the use of blockchain technology.

Blockchain network: Ethereum

Deployment: Fidentiax succeeded in raising funds for the project through its Crowd Token Contribution (CTC, aka ICO) in December 2017.

See also: How Insurance and Blockchain Fit  

Swiss Re – Smart contract management system

HQ: Zurich, Switzerland

Description: Swiss Re, a leading wholesale provider of reinsurance, insurance and other insurance-based forms of risk transfer, has partnered with 15 of Europe’s largest insurers and reinsurers (Achmea, Aegon, Ageas, Allianz, Generali, Hannover Re, Liberty Mutual, Munich Re, RGA, SCOR, Sompo Japan Nipponkoa Insurance, Tokio Marine Holdings, XL Catlin and the Zurich Insurance Group) to incorporate and evaluate the use of blockchain technology in the insurance industry. The Blockchain Insurance Industry Initiative (B3i) hopes to educate insurers and reinsurers on the employment of the blockchain technology in the insurance market. It serves as a platform for blockchain knowledge exchange and offers access to research and information on use case experiments. As of yet, there have only been individual company use cases in the industry. B3i is working to facilitate the widespread adoption of blockchain across the entire insurance value chain by evaluating its implementation as a viable tool for the industry in general and customers in particular. The initiative envisions efficient and modern management of insurance transactions with common standards and practices. To this end, it has developed a smart contract management system to explore the potential of distributed ledger technologies as a way to improve services to clients by making them faster, more convenient and secure.

Blockchain network: Ethereum

Deployment: B3i was launched in in October 2016. On Sept. 7, 2017, B3i presented a fully functional beta version of its blockchain-run joint distributed ledger for reinsurance transactions. On March 23, 2018, the B3i Initiative incorporated B3i Services company to continue to promote the B3i Initiative’s goal of transforming the insurance industry through blockchain technology.

Sofocle – Automating claim settlement

HQ: Northern Ireland, U.K.

Description: Through smart contracts, AI and mobile apps, Sofocle employs blockchain technology to automate insurance processes. All relevant documents can be uploaded by customers via mobile app, thus minimizing paperwork. Use of smart contracts allows for a far more efficient and faster settlement process. Claims agents can verify insurance claims, which are recorded on the blockchain in real time. The smart contracts allow for verification of a predetermined condition by an external data source (trigger), following which the customer automatically receives the claims payment.

Blockchain network: Bitcoin

Dynamis – P2P Insurance

HQ: U.K.

Description: Dynamis’ Ethereum-based platform provides peer-to-peer (P2P) supplementary unemployment insurance, using the LinkedIn social network as a reputation system. When applying for a policy, the applicant’s identity and employment status is verified through LinkedIn. Claimants are also able to validate that they are seeking employment through their LinkedIn connections. Participants can acquire new policies or open new claims by exercising their social capital within their social network.

Blockchain Network: Ethereum and Bitcoin

Deployment: The goal of Dynamis is the creation of a decentralized autonomous organization (DAO) to restore trust and transparency in the insurance industry. Its community-based unemployment insurance employs smart contracts and runs on the Ethereum blockchain platform. Using social networking data and validation points, Dynamis verifies a claimant’s employment status among peers and colleagues. It also depends on Bitcoin-powered smart contracts to automate claims.

Conclusion

Recognizing the benefits of blockchain and smart contracts, the insurance industry has begun to explore their potential. With the traditional insurance model, validating an insurer’s claim is a lengthy, complicated process. Blockchain has the ability to combine various resources into smart contract validation. It also offers transparency, allowing the customer to play an active role in the process and to see what is being validated. This fosters trust between the insurer and the customer. Despite the obvious benefits of blockchain for insurers, reinsurers and customers, the industry has yet to adopt blockchain on a large scale. The primary reason for this is that blockchain adoption has until now required in-depth knowledge and skills in blockchain-specific programming languages. The limited number and high cost of hiring blockchain experts have rendered the technology out of reach for many businesses in the industry. Without access to the technology, exposure to blockchain and the ability to reap its benefits will remain limited for insurance companies.

How can these obstacles be overcome? The key is accessibility to enable all parties within the insurance ecosystem to reap the benefits of blockchain and smart contracts. There is a dire need for a bridge between the blockchain technology and these industry players. This is the role that the iOlite platform fulfills. iOlite provides mainstream businesses with easy access to blockchain technology. iOlite is integrated via an IDE (integrated development environment) plugin, maintaining a familiar environment for programmers and providing untrained users simple tools to work with. The iOlite platform thus enables any business to integrate blockchain into its workflow to write smart contracts and design blockchain applications using natural language.

How it works? iOlite’s open-source platform translates any natural language into smart contract code available for execution on any blockchain. The solution utilizes CI (collective intelligence), in essence a crowdsourcing of coder expertise, which is aggregated into a knowledge database, i.e. iOlite Blockchain. This knowledge is then used by the iOlite NLP grammar engine (based on Stanford UC research), the Fast Adaptation Engine (FAE), to migrate input text into the target blockchain executable code.

See also: Blockchain – What Is It Good for?  

The future of blockchain in insurance

With a clear direction of blockchain adoption for the future, insurance companies will be forced to adapt or be left behind. The adoption of blockchain by the insurance industry is no longer a question of if but how.