Tag Archives: human resources

AI in a Post-Pandemic Future

The COVID-19 pandemic put businesses under extreme pressure and has led to a massively accelerated digitalization of the workplace. The silver lining is the opportunity to develop more efficient, digital operating models by reinventing work and leveraging the power of artificial intelligence and automation.

Artificial intelligence and why it matters

Hype has for some time surrounded AI, but promises first made more than 60 years ago are now finally being delivered. What has been the game changer responsible for putting AI back on the map and on the verge of changing, well, just about everything? The answer is deep learning, an old idea that found an opportunity to mature in the late 1990s and early 2000s. 

Based on learning tasks using artificial neural networks inspired by the biological nervous system, deep learning technology is highly advanced and requires vast volumes of data and computing power only recently made possible. By 2030, AI is estimated to contribute as much as $15 trillion to the world economy, making it the biggest commercial opportunity in today’s fast-changing economy. Indeed, the new realities of the post-COVID-19 world require the accelerated adoption of AI to deliver the efficiencies and augmentations of a highly digitized workplace.

Figure 1: AI’s projected impact on global GDP

For more than 250 years, the fundamental drivers of economic growth have been technological innovations, the most important being general-purpose technologies such as electricity and the steam engine. Now it is AI that stands out as the transformational technology of our digital age, which, as with previous GPTs (general purpose technologies), is expected to trigger waves of complementary innovations and opportunities.

What tangible opportunities does AI offer businesses right now? We are currently witnessing the first wave, usually as a result of companies automating tasks and processes, reducing costs and creating more efficiencies. The work dividends from this first wave are mostly positive. Low-level, tedious, hazardous and boring tasks are taken over by machines, freeing time for the humans to do the higher-level, more productive tasks. 

Significant shifts in computing power and availability of large-scale data advance the development of AI applications that continue to rapidly grow in complexity and autonomy. AI’s autonomous nature and the way it is trained on data – essentially learning from the mistakes made in the past – make the technology both an opportunity and a risk.

See also: 4 Post-COVID-19 Trends for Insurers

AI at work

As organizations deploy technologies that automate work or introduce machine intelligence in the organization, the limiting factor in translating these innovations into real business benefits will be talent. Beyond the designers, developers and data scientists that everyone is battling for today, companies will need to explore what new roles are likely to emerge in digital disruptors.

As with many professions, underwriters have been doing a job one way for decades and now are expected to do things differently. The role is primed for transformation as AI is poised to reconfigure and augment insurance underwriting. Fueled by an explosion of data, low-cost data storage and open source technology, AI has the potential to help underwriters analyze an incredible amount of information, find red flags and help make more accurate decisions. 

While there is no expectation for human underwriters to be replaced, as their judgment will still be needed for complex cases, future underwriters will be expected to work alongside AI systems to ensure all risks are accurately measured and priced. As underwriters increasingly interact with automated AI systems, there will be a need for new skill sets to develop, with some old skills potentially becoming obsolete.

Meanwhile, demand for these new skills far outstrips supply at present, which indicates that the main roadblock to insurers capturing the full value of this new technology is not the science, but the human change management factor. It is a tall order, but starting by having the right people with the right skills in the right roles will far outweigh picking the right technology, algorithm or latest start-up to work with.

More digital, more human

One of the major transformations of the digital age is to see more companies adopting a flat working structure, where career paths are less clear and the turnaround of young talent greater. In this new environment, a next-generation operating model that supports the opportunity to learn skills, to have thought leaders provide mentoring and to involve new staff in meaningful projects will be critical to attract and retain the best digital talent. 

By moving beyond a one-size-fits-all approach to human resources and talent management, digital workforce platforms can help create the conditions in which employees feel energized by their work, valued by their organization and happy in their environment.

Google and Apple are examples of early adopters of digital workforce platforms that built ecosystems allowing them to innovate, take advantage of new technologies to cut costs, improve quality, build value and respond quickly to the fast-changing and rising digital expectations of consumers. How can this model be replicated across other industries?

The answer may depend on the ability of corporate leaders to restabilize the workforce — and to reconceive organizational structures — by using the very same digital technologies that have destabilized it in the first place. The incoming AI revolution should reinforce, not weaken, the uniquely human characteristics that define how we work, particularly in the way that we collaborate, communicate and develop relationships. To fully exploit emerging digital capabilities, most organizations will continue to depend on people, with human skills actually becoming more critical in the digital world, not less. 

See also: Stop Being Scared of Artificial Intelligence

As tasks are automated, they tend to become commoditized; a “cutting edge” technology such as smartphone submission of insurance claims quickly becomes almost ubiquitous. In many contexts, therefore, competitive advantage is likely to depend even more on human capacity, on providing thoughtful advice to an investor saving for retirement or calm guidance to an insurance customer after an accident.

AI is likely to be one of the biggest game changers in insurance history, offering a wide range of opportunities from faster and more efficient claims management to a greater variety of on-demand insurance services. As organizations transform to thrive in a digital environment, their success will be affected by how well they integrate their workforce into the transformation journey and manage the tension between the constant drive to innovate and improve and the new governance, compliance and regulatory risks created by new AI technologies. Digital transformation requires the overhaul of culture beyond technology updates or process redesign to reap the anticipated benefits.

Top Challenge for HR Teams in 2018

We all have that colleague who overuses buzz words and phrases such as: “synergy,” “deep dive” and “low-hanging fruit.” Yet, every now and again, a buzz word arises that actually affects your business.

In 2018, that word is going to be “agile,” and human resource teams will be responsible for making it a reality across the organization. Business agility is the ability to adapt and respond rapidly to changes in the environment while sustaining success. Depending on the size and stage of your organization, agility may require bold internal policy transformations, a new approach to hiring or paradigm shifts in company culture.

Agile isn’t new, so why will it creep up the challenges list in 2018?

With questions swirling around whether the economy can sustain its momentum, uncertainty has again set in. Organizations with the ability to quickly adapt to changing business and economic conditions, companywide and HR-focused objectives – particularly those focused on driving growth – won’t have to be compromised. Yet nearly 700 executives reported having little confidence in their companies’ ability to quickly mobilize in response to market shifts. More than 50% of those surveyed did not believe that their culture was adaptive enough to respond.

See also: The Human Resources View Of Health Care Benefits Needs To Change 

To solve this quandary, CEOs are turning to HR leaders. CEOs are providing a mandate to create a workforce and cultivate a culture that is agile and nimble enough to capitalize on new opportunities and overcome deep-rooted organizational challenges.

At Peak Sales Recruiting, we work with HR leaders from some of the most innovative and disruptive companies. Based on their collective experiences and the latest studies, we have compiled three ways human resource and talent acquisition teams can harness the power of agility to drive organizational performance in 2018:

1. Learn from Tom Cruise in “Mission Impossible:” In the popular movie franchise, Cruise leads IMF, a self-managed team that operates outside of government bureaucracy to save the U.S. from evil. In the real world, many leading companies such as Microsoft, Spotify and Airbnb have employed similar strategies. For example, “Scaling Agile @ Spotify” formed cross-departmental teams that functioned like a startup, with Spotify as the incubator. The teams – Tribes and Guilds – had delegated decision-making autonomy on key service and product development initiatives. Their work has been so important that they’ve helped the company keep giants like Apple from stealing market share in a growth segment.

Bain research studied 300 large corporations worldwide and found that the top quartile’s key to success was that they spent 50% less time on unnecessary and ineffective collaboration. That is why small, talented teams that work outside of traditional hierarchical management systems can solve mission-critical issues, faster. To be more agile in 2018, HR departments must work closely with C-suite executives on empowering middle and front-line leaders to build nimble, cross-functional teams.

2. Transform internally at scale: A Korn Ferry Institute study found that increasing investment in aligning HR practices with business objectives resulted in a 7.5% decrease in employee turnover and, on a per-employee basis, $27,044 more in sales, $18,641 more in market value and $3,814 more in profit. But in tech, HR departments have traditionally struggled to be aligned with rapid go-to-market plays and shorter product-development cycles. Workforce policy development, talent acquisition tactics and competency and performance review initiatives weren’t in sync with the changing pace of business. Using agility as its foundation, one company approached the problem differently.

McKinsey recently released a case study called ING’s Agile Transformation. Recognizing the importance of agility at scale, ING made 3,500 employees re-interview for their jobs. Remarkably, 40% of them ended up in new positions within the company or were let go. In many cases, the change was not because of an employee’s skill set. The issue was whether employees could embrace the constant state of change that financial service and fintech organizations need to remain competitive. ING’s HR department led an unprecedented overhaul of their organization, and this experience can be replicated across organizations in 2018.

3. Hire change agents with a versatile skill set: The phrase, “We have always done it this way,” is the kryptonite to success. Economic volatility and advances in technology, in certain cases, render last year’s business plan obsolete. While it is not necessary to reinvent the wheel every time, HR departments must evolve their competency models to hire people possessing change agent traits and experiences. Steve Jobs famously said that, if you want to hire change agents, hire pirates. He wanted employees who would challenge the status quo and were flexible, diverse, passionate and results-oriented. If HR departments do not bring in fresh people and ideas, the company will fail to improve in 2018.

See also: Hacking the Human: Social Engineering

Due to rapid changes in technology and the global economy, business agility will be a key differentiator between company failure and success. Being agile while maintaining company values and processes is a tightrope that CEOs are asking human resource professionals to figure out. Never has a buzz word meant so much.

New Approach to Mental Health

In recent years, thought leaders in business, government and risk management have developed a sophisticated understanding of the bottom-line impacts of untreated mental illness in the workplace. For example, mental health and brain science dominated the agenda at the Davos World Economic Forum in 2015. And the National Business Group on Health held its first CEO Mental Health Summit in October 2015. Among the costs highlighted in these forums: worker productivity loss, high healthcare utilization rates, skyrocketing disability outlays and employment litigation.

To further advance mental wellness in the workplace, it’s essential for legal and human resources to be part of this collective effort. Here, we explore this disparity in approaches, and discuss why it is so harmful to the interests of all – employers, insurers, employees and their families.

See also: Language and Mental Health

What most thought leaders know about workplace mental health, in a nutshell, is this:

  1. Mental illness is common and treatable, with a 25% incidence rate and an 80% recovery rate, akin to chronic physical illnesses;
  2. Early detection and treatment are the most effective and inexpensive means of helping employees get well and return to full productivity quickly; and
  3. If an employee takes a leave of absence, the longer the absence, the less likely the employee is to return to work.

Thus, the organizational strategic imperative is to create workplace conditions designed to enhance early detection and treatment, restoring the status quo as efficiently as possible.

In stark contrast to this organizational imperative, legal and human resources professionals often advise supervisors, managers and EAP professionals to treat potential emotional and mental health issues exclusively as a performance matter. This advice is usually driven by a desire to “avoid an ADA claim.” However, this approach usually postpones the inevitable and makes a claim under the Americans with Disabilities Act more, not less, likely.

The result is often this pattern: a continuing decline in the employee’s condition and work performance, a severing of trust between employee and supervisor and isolation from others at work. Once a disciplinary action or performance improvement plan is imposed, both parties cut ties, and the result is a toxic cycle of leave of absence, disability claim, a request for accommodation, a failed interactive process, separation of employment and either litigation or a pay package. This is an expensive, disruptive and painful process that can often be avoided.

Employers would do well to consider this as an alternative approach:

Design a mental health policy that will unify executive leadership, legal counsel and human resources around the organization’s strategic approach to overall wellness.

  • This policy defines the vision, and the business case, for improving the mental health of the workforce and using the ADA interactive process as an effective means of achieving early detection and treatment of these impairments.
  • Training for supervisors, managers, legal counsel, HR, EAP staff and healthcare providers will highlight: A timely and collaborative exchange of information and interactive process maximizes success; the ADA does not require a fundamental alteration of any job; work teams and supervisors need to partner with HR on making accommodations work.
  • The policy will establish a confidential process for employees to obtain affordable, accessible treatment (either through existing vendors or through curated referrals).
  • Developing and implementing the mental health policy can stimulate and engage your organization in a discussion of the high incidence of emotional and mental health impairments and how these common, treatable conditions can be accommodated.
  • Mental Health 101 Training should be integrated into total wellness programs, including how to mitigate and address stressors in the workplace, how to respond to a colleague or supervisee who may be struggling and how to seek help confidentially.
  • Mental health champions should be designated, trained and made available as confidential resources to anyone at any point in the chain of command dealing with a mental health issue.

When executive leadership, legal counsel and human resources unify behind a strategic, business-savvy approach grounded in total wellness and ADA compliance, everybody wins.

See also: Why Mental Health Matters in Work Comp  

Insurance Thought Leadership’s continuing series of articles focused on suicide prevention is written by the Workplace Task Force of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention, the public-private partnership championing suicide prevention as a national priority.

An Underestimated Source of Risk

When directors or CEOs or senior managers think about risk, they generally envision risks associated with the company’s finances, manufacturing, data, supply chain and customers. Human resource risk is often underappreciated, and that can be a serious misjudgment. Recent events, lawsuits and settlements prove this point.

It is true that the risk associated with talent and a lack thereof has risen in the risk hierarchy of most organizations. However, the many other serious risks associated with managing existing talent are often relegated to the bottom of the risk register.

The reasons for this underestimation are varied. Many executives tend to think that: 1) human resource matters are supplemental to the business rather than integral, 2) being an “employer at will” protects the company and enables it to make human resource decisions however it sees fit, 3) a single employee, applicant or retiree is no risk to the organization as a whole (even though a single employee can potentially cause a “class” to be formed under the law). The danger inherent in underestimating HR risk is that it does not get adequately addressed with mitigation plans.

Not all organizations will have the same exposure to risks. Even if they did have the same exposure, some will have more safeguards already in place and warrant a lower risk ranking than some other organization. The discussion that follows is not meant to imply that all HR risks must be prioritized at the top right hand corner of a heat map. It is meant to highlight the potential impact that some HR risks can have on an organization.

Rogue Employee Risk

The rogue employee is one of the most amazing phenomena among human resource risk categories. In financial services, rogue employees have wreaked havoc on otherwise solid and long-standing businesses. Two noteworthy examples are Barings Bank, London’s oldest merchant banks, and UBS, one of Switzerland’s financial giants. Roughly 20 years ago, Nick Leeson, a Barings Bank derivatives trader, gambled away the equivalent of $1. 4 billion of bank money from a secret “error” account. The bank went bust and was bought by ING for a nominal sum. In 2011, UBS announced it had lost $2 billion due to unauthorized trades by a director at its global synthetic equities desk.

And financial institutions are not the only organizations exposed to rogue employee actions that create huge risks and large losses. For instance, GNP, parent of Just BARE and Gold’n Plump, just recalled 55,608 pounds of chicken because of what it called a “product tampering incident” at one of its processing plants.

Here are some of the ways in which such an employee can create risk in just about any industry sector and for which organizations need to develop safeguards as part of their mitigation plans:

  • Abetting a data breach affecting customer/employee personal data
  • Sabotaging mechanical or technological equipment
  • Sabotaging products intended for sale
  • Stealing company property, including intellectual property
  • Mishandling customers/patients on purpose

See also: Risk Management, in Plain English

A fundamental safeguard is thorough vetting during the employment process. Others include: 1) active supervision, 2) automatic, system alerts when authorities are exceeded or other rogue actions are attempted, 3) robust internal audits.

Regulatory Violations Risk

Organizations must deal with employee-related regulation at the local, state and federal level. The number of major federal regulations has grown significantly in the past few decades and now includes such well-known acts as: the Fair Labor Standards Act, Title VII, Age Discrimination Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, Employee Retirement Income Security Act, Family and Medical Leave Act and WARN Act. Each of these has numerous elements that must be understood and complied with, including gray areas that need to be thought through before any action regarding an employee can be decided on.

The Fair Labor Standards Act has been the high-risk area of late. There have been numerous types of suits under this act related to: 1) misclassification of employees into exempt and non-exempt categories, which has implications for overtime pay, 2) incorrect calculation of overtime pay for those due it, 3) mismanagement of paid break time.

A $188 million judgment against Walmart, which is being appealed, had to do with paid versus unpaid break time. Interestingly, this case revolves around the company not living up to the policies in its own handbooks, not around a failure to fulfill specific requirements spelled out in the law. This case is, therefore, illustrative of two important points. First, settlements can be financially significant even for the largest of companies. Second, when dealing with human resource matters, formal programs or policies, which constitute a contractual obligation, have to be considered.

See also: Building a Strong Insurance Risk Culture

Wage and hour suits are likely to keep increasing in 2016 due to the success of recent plaintiffs, new regulations regarding overtime pay and an overall concern among employees that wages are not sufficient or not fair. In an article titled “Why Wage and Hour Litigation Is Skyrocketing,” Lydia DePillis writes, “The number of wage and hour cases filed in federal court rose to 8,871 for the year [ended] Sept. 30, up from 1,935 in 2000.”

Title VII and age discrimination cases have been associated with large dollar losses over the years. Given the many federal, state and local statutes, coupled with a more informed and litigious employee population, organizations can inadvertently step into non-compliance pitfalls rather easily.

Organizations should always follow the laws that apply to them. Risk enters into the equation because there is always the potential that someone in management is unaware or careless or, worse yet, disrespectful of the laws. Thus, the organization is continuously exposed to the risk of violations. Every effort should be made to be compliant, including: 1) having a clear set of core values that guide lawful behavior, 2) educating management and all employees about the laws and how to comply with them, 3) investing in strong compliance processes and 4) making sure violators are dealt with quickly and appropriately.

HR Program Risk

Human resources professionals create and administer many expensive programs such as retirement, benefits, compensation and incentive programs. A large error in terms of budgeting or managing such programs could lead to a sizable financial risk for the organization.

Imagine an actuarial error that creates severe pension underfunding or a poorly managed self-insured medical benefit plan that costs double what benchmarks would suggest. Or, consider a new incentive program that produces the antithesis of the behavior it was intended to promote. The risk can be major, not unlike the size and seriousness of a natural catastrophe or product recall or supply chain debacle.

CEOs need to ensure that HR programs and policies are being handled by expert professionals, whether staff or consultants. At the same time, senior management needs to invest the attention and support necessary to ensure these are well-designed and implemented according to specification.

The comments in this article are neither meant to be all-inclusive nor to be construed as advice.

How to Win at Work Comp Claims

So many people want to blame the injured worker for the high cost of workers’ compensation; they say the worker doesn’t want to get better.

But consider these two patients, limping into two different medical clinics with the same complaint. Both have trouble walking and appear to require hip surgery. The first patient is examined within the hour, is X-rayed the same day and has a time booked for surgery the following week. The second sees the physician after waiting three weeks for an appointment, then waits eight weeks to see a specialist, then gets an X-ray, which isn’t reviewed for another week, and finally has surgery scheduled for six months later, pending the review of a utilization board, which will determine the employee’s remaining value to his employer. Why the different treatment for the two patients? The first is a Golden Retriever taken to a veterinarian. The second is an injured employee entering the workers’ compensation system.

Maybe we need to send our injured employees to a good vet!

The No. 1 cost driver of a workers’ compensation claim is that the injured worker is not getting better. But the sad reality is that the injured worker isn’t even given an honest opportunity. Everyone just wants to kick the can down the work comp road, believing the best way to save money is by limiting treatment opportunities.

Look at back pain, which is the most expensive industrial injury and the most common cause of disability in patients under 45 years of age. More than five million Americans are disabled by back pain, and more than half of those will develop a permanent condition. Studies show that direct healthcare expenditures exceed $20 billion annually, and indirect expenditures associated with back-related injuries are greater than $30 billion. Disorders of the musculoskeletal system are the most common causes of absence from work in both men and women between the ages of 30 and 65. Back pain is the dominating subgroup and is the second leading cause of workplace absenteeism.

See Also: How Should Workers’ Compensation Evolve?

There are plenty of statistics showing the direct costs associated with occupational back injuries average $37,000. Indirect costs range from $147,000 to $300,000.

It therefore follows that if an employer could redirect its resources and attention to the aggressive treatment of the acute back pain patient, with a view to preventing chronicity, the company would be able to reduce costs.

In fact, we have a proven system that has direct and indirect cost savings; however, it requires the employer to take control of its workers’ comp group and change the way business is being done.

Unfortunately, only a small minority of employers play at the tip of the spear and way too many employers who sit on the sideline and expect everyone else to take care of the issues.

So, we are challenging you, the employer, to get in the game, change your team line-up and win the game of managing your workers’ compensation division.

Here’s how:

Once the injured employee enters the world of workers’ compensation as either a medical, indemnity or future medical claim, the healthcare professional becomes one of the key decision makers in the employee’s recovery and return-to-work. Usually, the professional helps the injured worker recover through minimum symptomatic treatment protocols authorized by utilization review boards and return to her job in a modified duty capacity with appropriate restrictions.

The employee comes back to work, with restrictions, and in most cases the safety supervisor or human resources person assists in monitoring the employee to verify that the healthcare professional’s recommendations are being reasonably accommodated.

In a perfect world, this scenario may work. The employee recovers, the medical bills are paid and the work tasks are re-evaluated. However, in most cases, once the employee is injured, delayed treatment ensues, the injured worker develops co-morbidities associated with his injury, an applicant’s attorney gets involved and the reserves then begin escalating. At this point, any optimal solution becomes a distant thought. The only player who has the incentive to change the game is the one paying the bills… the employer!!

How can an employer change the workers’ compensation cycle to bring about solutions for all the players involved? It takes moral courage to change your team line-up and manage your claims better. Can it be done? Absolutely, and we’ve done it.

Employers have historically taken an adversarial approach to workers’ compensation claims even though the law is on the employee’s side. It makes sense to immediately engage the injured employee and set the expectations for recovery. This is part of the overall strategy to create a claims handling “team” that will align with the core competencies of the business environment. Setting the team line-up to implement an active approach to claims management will be a game changer.

As an employer, here’s an outline of what this would look like:

  1. Identify your team members; business unit manager, risk manager, safety professional, claims examiner manager, claims examiner, medical director, healthcare providers, nurse case manager, legal counsel and medical fitness consultant.
  2. Have a prominent seat at the workers’ compensation round table, whether you are fully insured or a self-insured employer.
  3. Know the workers’ compensation claim life cycle and your role in influencing outcomes.
  4. Be sure the claim examiners on your files know and understand the employer’s risk management goals and objectives.
  5. Have essential job functions (EJFs) for all positions readily accessible for the healthcare professionals and claims examiner.
  6. Perform quarterly claim review meetings on all open and recently closed claims. The meetings should include your entire workers’ comp team, so discussions can progress around treating the whole person and not just the affected body part. Remember, at some point a body part adds to the potentially new claim of cumulative trauma.
  7. As the employer, limit the claim examiner case load to 100 claims or less per examiner. This allows for more in-depth understanding of claim resolution solutions in addition to claims handling by regulatory deadlines.
  8. Make sure your insurance broker supports your desire to incorporate a medical aftercare program managed by a medical fitness organization that understands the workers’ compensation process and your strategic claims management system.

Savvy Health Solutions has worked strategically with employers as part of their claims management team and addresses the whole person by focusing on improving overall strength and flexibility, postural responsiveness to activities of daily living and a motivational element that embeds the components of the program into sustainable lifestyle changes. Savvy has found that, the sooner an employee begins the program, the quicker the employee is returned to full duties, and the claim is closed:

  1. The safety person, now having a more comprehensive understanding of musculoskeletal issues, can revisit the company’s job hazard analysis for accuracy and completeness. This technique breaks each job down into individual tasks to identify hazards and focuses on the worker, the task, the tools and the work environment. The analysis is also a key component for compliance with OSHA’s injury and illness prevention program requirements.
  2. The claims examiner is educated on the work environment. With fewer claims to handle, the examiner can spend extra time on the job to better understand the work environment from an employee’s perspective. Essential job functions and job hazard analysis have more meaning once seen in action. Claims examiners will begin to understand how people do the work, in addition to meeting the expectations of the Department of Workers’ Compensation in managing a claim.
  3. A team approach helps the claims examiner to think more like a business person. Outside consultants, like Savvy Health Solutions, help the employer see a new way of claims resolution and prevention of further injuries.
  4. The effectiveness of the workers’ compensation team can be measured with metrics created as part of your annual insurance renewal process/contract or as part of your third party administrator contract renewal.

Too many internal silos and “leaving it to the claims experts” can run against a culture of treating employees with respect and dignity when injured. The employer needs to be the key stakeholder in the process, having the same key performance indicators (KPIs) for workers’ compensation as it is done for safety metrics and profitability.

This methodology is counterintuitive to the typical workers’ compensation claims handling structure. Success starts with the employer and involves every single team member, business unit manager, risk manager, safety professional, claims examiner manager, claims examiner, medical director, healthcare providers, nurse case manager, legal counsel, insurance agents and brokers and medical fitness consultants.

Developing a winning line-up with your team will improve your ability to control costs and reach a desired outcome for the employee first, and then the organization. Because when the injured employee recovers from his injury, restores normal function and improves quality of life, then everyone wins.