Tag Archives: heart attack

1 Myth, 2 Truths, 5 Hot Trends in Health IT

There is a myth out there that healthcare providers are unwilling to adopt new technology. It’s just not true. In the last few months, I have spoken to dozens of healthcare leaders at hospitals both small and large, and I am amazed at their willingness to understand and adopt technology.

Pretty much every hospital CEO, COO, CMIO or CIO I talk to believes two things:

With growing demand, rising costs and constrained supply, healthcare is facing a crisis unless providers figure out how to “do more with less.”

Technology is a key enabler. There is technology out there to help save more lives, deliver better care, reduce costs and achieve a healthier America. If a technology solution solves a real problem and has a clearly articulated return on investment (ROI), healthcare isn’t that different from any other industry, and the healthcare industry is willing to adopt that technology.

Given my conversations, here are the five biggest IT trends I see in healthcare:

1. Consumerization of the electronic health record (EHR). Love it or hate it, the EHR sits at the center of innovation. Since the passage of the HITECH Act in 2009—a $30 billion effort to transform healthcare delivery through the widespread use of EHRs—the “next generation” EHR is becoming a reality driven by three factors:

  • Providers feeling the pressure to find innovative ways to cut costs and bring more efficiency to healthcare delivery
  • The explosion of “machine-generated” healthcare data from mobile apps, wearables and sensors
  • The “operating terminal” shifting from a desktop to a smartphone/tablet, forcing providers to reimagine how patient care data is produced and consumed

The “next generation” EHR will be built around physicians’ workflows and will make it easier for them to produce and consume data. It will, of course, need to have proper controls in place to make sure data can only be accessed by the right people to ensure privacy and safety. I expect more organizations will adopt the “app store” model Kaiser pioneered so that developers can innovate on their open platform.

2. Interoperability— Lack of system interoperability has made it very hard for providers to adopt new technologies such as data mining, machine learning, image recognition, the Internet of Things and mobile. This is changing fast because:

  • HHS’s mandate for interoperability in all EHRs by 2024 means patient data can be shared across systems to enable better care at lower cost.
  • HITECH incentives and the mandate to move 50% of Medicare payments from fee-for-service to value-based alternatives by 2018 imply care coordination. Interoperability will become imperative.
  • Project Argonaut, an industry-wide effort to create a modern API and data/services sharing between the EHR and other systems using HL7 FHIR, has already made impressive progress.
  • More than 60% of the proposed Stage 3 meaningful use rules require interoperability, up from 33% in Stage 2.

3. Mobile— With more than 50% of patients using their smartphone to monitor health and more than 50% of physicians using (or wanting to use) their smartphone to monitor patient health, and with seamless data sharing on its way, the way care is delivered will truly change.

Telemedicine is showing significant gains in delivering primary care. We will continue to see more adoption of mobile-enabled services for ambulatory and specialty care in 2016 and beyond for three reasons:

  • Mobile provides “situational awareness” to all stakeholders so they can know what’s going on with a patient in an instant and can move the right resources quickly with the push of a button.
  • Mobile-enabled services radically reduce communication overhead, especially when you’re dealing with multiple situations at the same time with urgency and communication is key.
  • The services can significantly improve the patient experience and reduce operating costs. Studies have shown that remote monitoring and mobile post-discharge care can significantly reduce readmissions and unnecessary admissions.

The key hurdle here is regulatory compliance. For example, auto-dialing 9-1-1 if a phone detects a heart attack can be dangerous if not properly done. As with the EHR, mobile services have to be designed around physician workflows and must comply with regulations.

4. Big data— Healthcare has been slower than verticals such as retail to adopt big data technologies, mainly because the ROI has not been very clear to date. With more wins on both the clinical and operational sides, that’s clearly changing. Of all the technology capabilities, big data can have the greatest near-term impact on the clinical and operational sides for providers, and it will be one of the biggest trends in 2016 and beyond. Successful companies providing big data solutions will do three things right:

  • Clean up data as needed: There’s lots of data, but it’s not easy to access it, and isn’t not quite primed “or clean” for analysis. There’s only so much you can see, and you spend a lot of time cleansing before you can do any meaningful analysis.
  • Meaningful results: It’s not always hard to build predictive analytic models, but they have to translate to results that enable evidence-based decision-making.
  • Deliver ROI: There are a lot of products out there that produce 1% to 2% gains; that doesn’t necessarily justify the investment.

5. Internet of Things— While hospitals have been a bit slow in adopting IoT, three key trends will shape faster adoption:

  • Innovation in hardware components (smaller, faster CPUs at lower cost) will create cheaper, more advanced medical devices, such as a WiFi-enabled blood pressure monitor connected to the EHR for smoother patient care coordination.
  • General-purpose sensors are maturing and becoming more reliable for enterprise use.
  • Devices are becoming smart, but making them all work together is painful. It’s good to have bed sensors that talk to the nursing station, and they will become part of a top level “platform” within the hospital. More sensors also mean more data, and providers will create a “back-end platform” to collect, process and route it to the right place at the right time to can create “holistic” value propositions.

With increased regulatory and financial support, we’re on our way to making healthcare what it should be: smarter, cheaper and more effective. Providers want to do whatever it takes to cut costs and improve patient access and experience, so there are no real barriers.

Innovate and prosper!

Why U.S. Healthcare Is So Mediocre

In my capacity as benefits consultant, I often hear employees say they know we have the most expensive system in the world, but they feel that is a fair trade-off because we have the U.S. healthcare system is the best in the world.

Well, let me disavow you of that notion. Every metric measurable shows that we have a mediocre system, at best! The World Health Organization ranks the U.S. healthcare system as 37th in the world, strictly based on outcomes. That puts us tied with Slovenia but significantly behind Costa Rica, Saudi Arabia, Colombia and the bankrupt country of Greece.

Part of the reason for the poor results, I believe, is because we don’t ask hard questions on the quality of care we receive (and likely wouldn’t get answers, if we did). Does anyone know the readmission rate or infection rate of the hospital they are about to have a surgical procedure in?

Stephen Dubner of Freakonomics fame asked the following question: There are two major cardiology conferences each year, where more than 7,000 of the top cardiologists and thoracic surgeons go for one to two weeks each; what happens to the quality of care in their facilities while they are gone?

I tried to imagine: Would I want to even go to the hospital knowing the top doctors were away?

To get to the answer on quality of care, Dubner used 10 years of data from Medicare looking at more than 10,000 patients with emergency types of heart conditions (like heart attacks) so that patient choice of facility is largely removed as a variable. The baseline for the comparison against the work of these top doctors was data from teaching hospitals, even though conventional wisdom says, “Take me to the facility with the top doctors and keep me away from a teaching hospital. I don’t want any residents cutting their teeth on me!”

The answer: If you were brought to a teaching hospital for a heart attack, your mortality rate was about 15%. Mortality rate at a non-teaching hospital, with those top doctors, the week before or week after the convention was 25%! This is a HUGE swing! This means that, for every 100 heart attacks brought in, 10 more people die when the top doctors are around!

Let me put this in perspective. If you look at all treatments given for a heart attack, like beta blockers, Plavix, stents, angioplasty, aspirin….all these COMBINED reduce mortality by 2% to 3%!

Here is another interesting point. The amount of invasive treatments, like angioplasty and stents, are used in about 33% FEWER cases when the cardiologists are away.

Okay, so wait a second. Did I just say that better care is given when the top doctors are away, and, at the same time, less severe treatments are being administered and fewer dollars are being spent?

That sounds pretty counter-intuitive. Let me give my take on why.

When I think of a “top” cardiologist, an image comes to mind. He has lots of gray hair (not sure why my mind imagines a male, but it does), and has been doing cardiac surgery for decades. Does this sound about right?

Well, this doctor was trained in medical techniques 30 or 40 years ago, and he has likely been sued for malpractice, perhaps multiple times (which leads to “defensive” medicine). He frequently has ownership or at least compensation tied to the profitability of the facility where he practices. These traits lead to more care and often inappropriate (or unnecessary) care. The younger doctors, meanwhile, are less jaded by malpractice, less engaged in profits and more recently trained.

I ask you to question EVERYTHING when it relates to care. Assume nothing. One thing is clear; the more involved the patient is in her own care, the better the outcomes (and the lower the costs, too)!

Are Annual Physicals Really Worthless?

Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel wrote a contrarian opinion piece in the Jan. 8, 2015, issue of the New York Times titled, “Skip Your Annual Physical.” Dr. Emanuel is an oncologist at the University of Pennsylvania and was an adviser to the Obama administration regarding the design of health reform. He is also the brother of Rahm Emanuel, a former presidential chief of staff.

As you can guess from the title of the opinion article, Dr. Emanuel believes that annual physicals are not worth having because they do not reduce mortality. He cites a Cochrane Review study to back up his statement. Click here to read a summary of the study by the American Association of Family Practice.

Dr. Emanuel’s comments bring the following question to mind: How is one to have the evidence-based screenings recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) without an annual physical?

Here is a list of some of the USPSTF screenings and interventions that studies have shown to be of value by reducing morbidity or mortality that could be accomplished at an annual physical:

  1. Screening for Type II diabetes
  2. Screening for hypertension
  3. Screening for lipid disorders (e.g. high cholesterol)
  4. Screening and counseling for alcohol abuse
  5. Screening for cervical cancer every 3-5 years
  6. Screening for obesity
  7. Potential use of aspirin for the prevention of heart attack
  8. Counseling on folate vitamin supplements for all women capable of pregnancy to prevent neural tube defects
  9. Counseling overweight and obese patients to improve their diet and exercise habits

Source: American Association of Family Practice

Many of these conditions are not rare.  For example:

  • 9.3% of the U.S. population has diabetes-of whom, 9 million are undiagnosed (Click here for ADA source). Assuming a U.S. population of 300 million, 9 million is 3% of the population, so three in 100 screenings would find undiagnosed diabetes. In a company with 1,000 employees, screening for diabetes would result in identifying 30 new cases of diabetes.
  • 29% of the adult U.S. population has hypertension-17% are undiagnosed (Click here for CDC source). 17% of 29% is about (again) 3% of the adult U.S. population, so three in 100 screenings would find undiagnosed hypertension. In a company with 1,000 employees, screening for hypertension would result in identifying 30 new cases of hypertension.

An annual physical is a great way to address these nine proven screening tests and interventions that will lengthen life and reduce suffering. This is only a representative sample from the USPSTF.  There are actually more than nine. You would not “technically” need an annual physical, but you would have to have some other mechanism for having these screenings and interventions performed.  A similar point is made by the American Academy of Family Physicians in its review of the Cochrane study. However, the use of the doctor’s office as the setting for the screening means that if an abnormality is found (i.e. diabetes, hypertension, etc.), then the doctor can prescribe an intervention.

To skip an annual physical and to not have the screening performed some other way-and followed up on-is hazardous to your health