Tag Archives: healthcare m&a

3 Ways to Tame Healthcare M&A

The healthcare business is broken for consumers and taxpayers in America. And we can expect to see more mergers, acquisitions and large alliances in the coming months and years, all forming in the name of trying to control rising costs and taking better care of patients.

The question is: Will they?

Unfortunately, the answer usually is generally no. Let’s take a look at two recent headlines, starting with the CVS acquisition of Aetna.

While the CVS acquisition of Aetna makes financial sense for shareholders, the same cannot be said for consumers. CVS and Aetna, which individually represent severe conflicts of interest, together create an even larger systemic problem. American consumers need healthcare intermediaries to clearly represent the interests of either the patient or provider — they can’t do both.

Maybe we’re suffering from amnesia because we’ve forgotten why the Pharmacy Benefit Manager (PBM) industry exists in the first place. Years ago, insurers managed drugs themselves. However, the conflict of interest and the resulting price gouging was so bad that the PBM industry took off in the 1980s and became the de facto broker (intermediary) for the drug industry. Over the next three decades, the PBM industry “evolved,” and, today, the PBM business model looks worse than the insurance industry it once set out to fix. Considering the conflicted business models involved, it seems highly ironic that today’s largest PBM is buying one of the largest health plans. This was a bad idea 30 years ago, and it’s an even worse idea today.

See also: How Amazon Could Disrupt Care (Part 3)  

So why isn’t this going to control costs? Because it really is just a mechanism to switch roles from the “broker function” to that of the supplier. In this case, there is the added benefit that Aetna can get over the 85% Medical Loss Ratio (MLR) limitations by paying themselves as a supplier. All this does is further reduce choice, lock out competition and increase profitability for itself while increasing costs for purchasers.

Planning on larger mergers to control costs is a fool’s errand. Take a look at UnitedHealth Group (UHG), which owns UnitedHealthcare (UNH) and OptumRx. The company’s structure and scale is on par with a combined CVS and Aetna. UHG owns one of the largest health plan providers and one of the largest PBMs, and UHG continues to aggressively acquire other health care services companies.  Many corporate customers will tell you UNH is one of the most difficult insurers to work with because of restricted data sharing and lack of transparency. UNH also makes it nearly impossible to use services other than their own.  This is not a recipe to control costs, and it’s going to get worse because UHG recently announced the purchase of Davita’s Medical Group, which has hundreds of care facilities and about 30,000 affiliated physicians.

Another major issue with this acquisition is that it enables the combined entity to collect even more patient data and constrict its availability and use. CVS CEO Larry Merlo stated, “By integrating data across our enterprise assets and through the use of predictive analytics, we will create targeted interactions with patients to promote healthy behaviors and drive adherence, and this will further improve the quality of care for patients while also resulting in healthier outcomes.”  Mr. Merlo fails to acknowledge that the data the company integrates, uses for its benefit and sells for its profit is their customers’ data — to which the company claims ownership and restricts for others’ use. After the CVS-Aetna deal closes, restrictive data hoarding will stifle potential health benefits and further limit innovation opportunities.

Just a few weeks ago, another headline about an alliance forming to control rising costs captured our attention. Intermountain Healthcare, Ascension, SSM Health and Trinity Health announced they are joining forces to create a new generics drug company.

Again, on paper, the announcement seems like it could help control costs and benefit consumers. But taking a closer look at the match, the marketing value to the hospital chains has already vastly exceeded the cost reduction of the generic drugs in question as well as the pressure this places on big pharma by at least three or four orders of magnitude. Big Pharma isn’t in the generics business.

As egregious as the examples are that we keep talking about with Valeant and Turing, those are rounding errors in aggregate compared to the global sales of just one brand drug, Humira, which brought in $14 billion last year, alone.

Big Pharma is laughing all the way to the bank as the press keeps writing about how big a deal this is and how four hospital chains are going to change the landscape. These large monopolistic systems get the great publicity as they try to lay claim to the moral high ground. More importantly, we have, yet again, given providers of services (a.k.a hospital systems) who already have the reputation for marking up medicine such as Tylenol the power to mark up these new generics they will manufacture.

The most important announcement of the past few days is the one from Amazon, Berkshire-Hathaway and JP Morgan. While there are few concrete details, the message from the top is clear that these companies have decided to take matters into their own hands to control costs as all the intermediaries they have relied on haven’t delivered.

As those who represent consumers, benefits professionals have a crucial role to play as we continue to learn about more mergers, acquisitions and large alliances. As such, there are three things each of us as HR benefits professionals can do to help tame the M&A beast.

First, insist on transparency. This starts by making sure intermediaries (insurers and PBMs) never control supplier performance data. You should have the right to see whatever data you need about your suppliers — just as you would in any other industry. Stop working with intermediaries and suppliers that restrict or refuse to provide data. You should also require intermediaries to provide all supplier contracts they have in place. Trust, but verify.

See also: The PBM vs. the Drug Manufacturer  

Second, require your suppliers to pick a side — yours, or theirs, but not in between. You, not an intermediary, should be able to choose who provides services to you. You should never be penalized for choosing a supplier that isn’t your intermediary’s preferred choice.

Third, demand independence. Intermediaries must represent the company and customer interests. There’s an obvious conflict of interest when an intermediary also represents a seller of goods that constitutes a significant source of the intermediary’s revenue. Stop doing business with intermediaries who have such conflicts.

Congratulations to all the CVS and Aetna stockholders out there; there’s a big payday headed your way. Because one person’s profit is another person’s cost, expect the price of health care to increase in this brave new world.

However, in the long run, the rest of us are going to bet on the new Amazon/Berkshire-Hathaway/JP Morgan model from Bezos, Buffett and Dimon to lead the charge of purchasers taking control of their own destinies.