Tag Archives: health benefits

Impact of Change Fatigue on Selling

How many of you have ever put together a proposal for a prospect, and the more you worked on it, the more excited you got? By the time you have it finalized, it’s all you can do to not run over to their office right away. After all, it is SO OBVIOUS that you have the right solution for them. There is NO WAY they could say “No.” This one is in the bag!

But the unexpected “No” happens all the time, doesn’t it?!

Change has always been hard

Over the past several years, there has been a renewed interest in the unbundling of medical plans and the assembly of more creatively designed self-funded plans. It has become apparent how broken the system is and how much wasted money it sucks out of consumers’ wallets.

Benefits advisers have been educating themselves on where to look for the waste and restructure plans by implementing value-based insurance design (VBID) principles into self-funded plans. Quite often, these plans allow employers to improve the benefits they provide to employees while significantly reducing the costs.

We have regularly discussed, online, and in previous blogs, the frustration advisers have had with employers’ hesitation to make the changes necessary to put a new plan in place. “Thanks, but we’re going to stay where we are,” is a common, if seemingly irrational, response. Even when it comes with increased benefits and may offer cost savings as much as seven-figures.

Many factors contribute to the reluctance, but it just goes to prove something we all know. Change is hard; it always has been and always will be.

As the saying goes . . .

We don’t embrace the pain of change until the pain of not changing becomes greater.

Our ability to ignore the current pain is truly perplexing.

Until change is forced on us

The reality is, in a typical business environment, our circumstances evolve so gradually that we have the luxury of managing change on our terms. Oftentimes, the process includes making a conscious decision not to change at all.

And then came the pandemic.

The pandemic has FORCED unprecedented change on everyone. Not only have we all had to face change, but we have also had to face it at an unprecedented pace, level and frequency in EVERY aspect of our lives.

It’s safe to say we’re all exhausted.

Business owners are no different and may be the most tired of all. They have change fatigue and are saying unapologetically, “I’m not forcing ANY additional change on my employees.”

This is adding a hurdle to your challenge of bringing creative solutions to employers. When they arguably need these ideas more than ever, their aversion to additional change is at an all-time high. Not only are employers less inclined to move to self-funding right now, but they are also less willing to move from one fully insured carrier to another.

“NO MORE CHANGE” is a literal demand.

Change the change you ask them to make

This really sucks for those of you whose client acquisition strategy depends on prospects making plan changes in order for you to write a new client.

We recently asked on LinkedIn, “How are prospects responding (compared with pre-COVID) to recommendations to change their medical plan in exchange for significant savings?” 68% said they are finding prospects “less likely to change.”

However, this doesn’t mean you can’t be acquiring new clients right now. It merely means that, more than ever, you have to separate the business owner’s decision to work with you from the decision the owner makes about which plan to offer employees.

See also: An Inconvenient Sales Truth

Employers are faced with two primary decisions regarding their benefits program:

  1. the decision of which plan to offer and
  2. the decision of the adviser with whom they will work.

SOMETHING has to change

You can argue all day about what a bad decision it is for employers not to make plan changes, but that is the reality of where they are today. If you insist on showing up at renewal with a spreadsheet, you will quickly become a victim of their organizational change fatigue.

So, change when you are showing up and the decision you are ask them to make.

We write all the time about how critical it is for you to bring a broader, more consultative approach to the sales process. We preach all the time that there are countless opportunities (communication, technology, compliance, HR resources, etc.) for you to bring improved results to your clients that don’t necessitate any modifications to their benefits program.

Use this to your advantage. Yes, businesses have change fatigue. As much as they may ultimately benefit from a change, the last thing they want is the thought of anything else being disrupted.

They want and need relief. Lead them there, my friend.

The off-renewal, consultative sales process we have always promoted as a competitive advantage has quickly become a non-optional approach. Clients may fight irrationally against anything that brings additional change to their team. Still, they will embrace in a heartbeat a partner capable of delivering a respite from the challenges they find themselves dealing with every. single. day.

You can find this article originally published here.

Unnecessary Surgery: When Will It End?

Unnecessary surgery: When is it going to end? Not any time soon, unless a documented and proven approach is used by health benefit plan sponsors.

I began my healthcare career 35 years ago when, as a graduate student at Columbia University School of Public Health, I was awarded a full scholarship as a public health intern at Cornell Medical College in New York City. Dr. Eugene McCarthy at Cornell was the medical director of a Taft-Hartley joint union/management health benefits self-administered fund at the time and my mentor. I worked on the Building Service 32 B-J Health Fund, which was the focus of an eight-year study sponsored by the then-Department of Health, Education and Welfare (now Health and Human Services, or HHS) and which was the first study on second surgical opinions.

The study (1972-1980) followed union members and their families who were told they needed elective surgery and documented that roughly 30% of recommended surgeries turned out to be medically unnecessary. The study found 12 surgeries that generated the most second opinions that didn’t confirm the original diagnosis. This list comprises: back surgery, bone surgery and bunions of the foot, cataract removal, cholecystectomy, coronary bypass, hysterectomy, knee surgery, mastectomy, prostatectomy, hip surgery, repair of deviated septum and tonsillectomy.

What has changed on this list 35 years later? Very little, if anything.

USA Today on March 12, 2013, reported on a study that found that; “tens of thousands of times each year patients undergo surgery they don’t need.” After the release of this study, a former surgeon and professor at the Harvard School of Public Health stated that: “It is a very serious issue, and there really hasn’t been much movement to address it.”

A CNN special on March 10, 2013, reported that the U.S. spent $2.7 trillion on healthcare per year and that 30%, or roughly $800 billion, was wasted on care that did not improve outcomes. Sound familiar? The Cornell study said the same thing 31 years earlier.

Public and private employers, health, disability and workers’ comp insurers and state and federal programs such as Medicare and Medicaid are doing very little, if anything, to effectively address this problem. The solution to preventing unnecessary care and surgery is not in raising co-pays and deductibles and other out of pocket costs unless they are tied to consumer education and well-designed second-opinion programs.

In response to the USA Today article, a leading medical expert said, “You can shop for a toaster better than prostate surgery, because we don’t give patients enough information.” Another leading surgeon stated; “Far too many patients are having surgeries they don’t need, with associated major and severe complications such as long-term disability and even death.” Furthermore, “I see patients with neck and back problems, and at least 1/3 are scheduled for operations they don’t need, with no clinical findings except pain.”

What is the principal focus of today’s multibillion-dollar managed care industry, especially in workers’ compensation? Provider discounts, that’s what. But how is it a savings if the patient receives a discount on an operation he doesn’t need?

Most often, when I ask that question I am met with blank stares.

The New England Journal of Medicine in 2009 stated that a common knee surgery for osteoarthritis “isn’t effective in treating patients with moderate to severe forms of the disease.” Yet, according to federal researchers, 985,000 Americans have arthroscopic knee surgery each year, and 33% (more than 300,000) are for osteoarthritis “despite overwhelming medical evidence that arthroscopic surgery is not effective therapy for advanced osteoarthritis of the knee.”

According to the chairman of cardiovascular medicine at the world-renowned Cleveland Clinic, the U.S. health system is “doing a lot of heart procedures that people don’t need.” For example, angioplasty stent surgery in heart patients will likely relieve pain but “will not help a person live longer and will not protect against having another heart attack… What’s worse is that many of these surgeries will lead to bad outcomes.” He said, “This procedure should be performed for patients having a heart attack, but 95% of patients who have angioplasty surgery are not the result of a heart attack.”

The estimate on the direct medical costs to American businesses for low back pain is $90 billion a year; this doesn’t include workers’ compensation indemnity and litigation costs, disability costs, sick days and indirect costs such as lost productivity. As reported in my previous article, The Truth about Treating Low Back Pain, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) estimated that 40% of initial back surgeries, which amounts to more than 80,000 patients per year, have “failed back surgeries.” These unsuccessful back surgeries most often lead to a lifetime of debilitating back pain and billions more in long-term disability and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) costs. These patients — four out of every 10 — all wish they had received a second opinion now. Yet when I recommended a second-opinion program to a union health fund in New Jersey, the manager said: “I am not going to tell my union members they need to get a second opinion.” True story.

Although we were scheduled to have an informal lunch meeting, after I recommended the fund consider a second-opinion program the “lunch” part of the meeting disappeared, even though I had driven two hours to get there. Maybe that is where the expression there is “no such thing as a free lunch” comes from? The health fund manager was downright indignant about my suggestion even though the first-second opinion program was conducted on behalf of a union health fund and was overwhelmingly successful.

He did describe, however, how upset he was about the fund’s rising healthcare costs. I guess he just wanted to be able to complain about it instead of actually doing something about it on behalf of his members. (The president of the union confided in me afterward that he had failed back surgery many years ago and wished he had gone for a second opinion.)

A colleague of my mine who is a senior vice president of product development for a leading third-party administrator (TPA) confided that insurance companies and TPAs will not implement programs that I could design and implement for their clients because they would never admit it was a good idea, given that they didn’t invent it.

I also hear all the time from so-called experts that second surgical opinions don’t work and don’t save money.

But large self-insured employers and health, disability and workers’ comp insurers should follow the lead of the top sports teams who send their top athletes for second opinions all the time to places like the Hospital for Special Surgery (HHS) and New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia Medical Center in Manhattan or UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles.

When I send client employees or friends and neighbors for second opinions, they often tell me that their appointment was with the same doctor Tiger Woods or Derek Jeter went to. My response is, “exactly.” Very often, conservative treatment is recommended and produces great patient outcomes, especially for back injuries and diagnoses for conditions like carpal tunnel syndrome. (See Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: It’s Time to Explode the Myth.)

Most, if not all, top surgeons I have met welcome second opinions for their patients because, when surgery is recommended, they want their patients to be assured that another expert also believes it is in their best interests.

I interned at the first second-surgical opinion in the country. I wrote my master’s thesis at Columbia on what I learned and how to improve upon the design and administration of the very successful Cornell program. Although the phrase, “I want a second opinion,” is now common terminology in America from auto repair to surgery, it has not reduced the overall amount of unnecessary surgery. If your program is not successful or not saving money it is because there is a serious flaw in the design and administration.

What I have documented since I designed or administered the first corporate second-opinion benefit programs back in the early 1980s are several key components of a successful program. First, it must be mandatory for the plan member to receive a second opinion for selected elective surgeries. Remember, elective surgery, by definition, means scheduled in advance, not for life-threatening conditions. Second, the second-opinion physician must not be associated with the physician recommending surgery. The physician must truly be an independent board-certified expert. Third, the second-opinion physician cannot perform the surgery; this provision removes any conflict of interest.

In addition, although a plan member should be required to receive a second opinion to receive full benefits under the health plan, the decision on whether to have surgery is entirely up to the patient. The whole idea is to educate the patient on the pros and cons of proposed surgery and the potential benefits for non-surgical treatment or different type of surgery (lumpectomy vs total mastectomy, for example). (I also developed a process of administrative deferrals for instances when it would be impractical to obtain a second opinion or when the conditions were so overwhelming that the need for a second opinion could be waived.)

It is only by helping to make patients truly informed consumers of healthcare and educating them on the benefits of alternative surgical treatments that a program can be successful. Voluntary programs simply don’t work. Rarely do patients seek second opinions on their own, and most often do not know where to obtain and arrange for a top-notch second opinion. In addition, they often feel uncomfortable and do not want to tell their physician they are seeking a second opinion. That is why I found that a program only really works when patients can state that their “health plan requires that I get a second opinion.” The mandatory approach reduces unnecessary surgery dramatically and saves the plan sponsor money with at least 10:1 return on investment.

The most amazing reduction of unnecessary surgery and resulting savings to the plan sponsor comes simply by implementing and communicating the benefits and requirements of the program design that I outlined above. The reason is known as the “Sentinel Effect.” What the original Cornell study and others have documented is at least a 10% reduction in the amount of recommended elective surgery simply from announcing the program is now in effect. No need for an actual second opinion; merely require one!

Now that is cost-effective!

Promoting Peace of Mind in Work Comp

An employee’s peace of mind is equal in concern with the physical injury when it comes to a worker’s comp claim. An upset employee can lose motivation, incur a bad attitude and rationalize the over-use or abuse of WC benefits. I am adamant that employee satisfaction is as key a factor in WC claim outcomes as it is in overall employee productivity and job performance.

It is not the adjuster’s primary role to manage an employee’s peace of mind at the start of a new report. While we expect good “bedside manner” from an adjuster, she must reserve a defensive position and be a “bad-cop” if necessary. An astute employer sees the opportunity in meeting an employee’s concerns at the time of an injury. It is like adding another critical brick to strengthen the foundation of employee satisfaction.

The immediate task can be simple. A little bit of confident communication goes a long way. Step one is to put yourself in the injured employee’s shoes and imagine being faced with an inability to work. It is not a comfortable feeling.

Quick Tip: Prepare a “Top-10” Information Sheet for Quick Use

Concept: Include a quick-reading “Frequently Asked Questions” checklist as part of an overall information packet for new WC claimants.

Suggested Top 10 and Recommended Answers:

1) Which doctor do I use? – Identify the preferred list, contracted clinic or emergency facility. Explain degrees of employee choice if any does exist in your jurisdiction.

2) What if I can’t do my job? – “If the doctor determines you cannot perform your job, we will try to match you with a temporary alternate assignment. If there is no ability for you to work, your wages will be paid as a WC benefit.”

3) How much will I be paid? – Provide the statutory calculation formula for the comp rate and specify that the employee’s specific rate will be determined by the claims adjuster within 48-72 hours.

4) When do I start getting checks? – Explain the jurisdictional waiting period.

5) How do medical bills get paid? – “All bills will be paid directly to the doctors/providers. You do not pay any bills for accepted and covered treatment.”

6) Do I need an attorney? – “We will help facilitate your benefits. An attorney is not necessary unless you face a disputed issue and want it to be heard by a judge. However, it is your option and right to consult an attorney at any time.”

7) What do I do next? – Explain any other internal steps and forms; explain that an adjuster will make contact and go over additional information. If you have a designated adjuster, provide a name and contact info.

8) What about my health benefits / 401k contributions, etc? – Explain your policies and the jurisdictional requirements that continue benefits during a WC claim

9) Will I lose my job or be fired? – Explain that filing a WC claim is not a basis for termination but also reserve the right for progressive discipline because of safety violations, attendance, job abandonment, fraud and any internal policies that might relate to WC situations.

10) What if I have other questions? – Provide a designated internal WC contact with an open-door policy.

The Daily Grind Is Good for the Mind

The human brain thrives on what work gives us: activity, routine, social contact and identity.

The act of working gives employees far more than just the benefit of earned income. The World Health Organization names it as a health factor that, when present, contributes to health and, when absent, can increase the chances of ill health. This is particularly relevant in the discussion about mental health. What is it about work that contributes to mental health, and why should employers and insurers consider the health benefits of work?

Activity

When human beings are engaged in doing things, areas of the brain related to attentiveness are stimulated. When someone is off work, it is harder to find regular daily activity—it is not as easy to find the many everyday behaviors we do when we are working. Work provides a structure that tells us what to do. We then engage in hundreds of behaviors every day. Being in the act of doing these behaviors keeps us healthy. When we are not working, it can be hard to answer the question: “So what did you do today?” This absence of activity can have a profound impact on a person’s sense of accomplishment and purpose, which has an impact on mental health.

Routine

Work forces us into a rhythm and regular behavioral patterns that are actually good for us, even if sometimes we may resent the structure. Our bodies and brains enjoy the routine and benefit from the repeated predictable patterns of behavior. If we don’t have something to get out of bed for, it can be difficult to get out of bed. When someone is off work for any reason, the lack of daily direction can have a significant impact on well-being.

Social contact

We spend more waking hours with the people we work with (when we are working full-time hours) than with the people we love and live with. Human beings as mammals are social creatures and seek and thrive on social contact. Neural activity related to social contact is crucial to mental health, and social isolation is a risk factor for mental illness. We are connected to our co-workers because we are social beings who are genetically programmed to monitor and build social connections. We rely on the hundreds of exchanges inside the social context at work to meet our needs for belonging and connection. When people are off work, they lose this continuing social contact, and the isolation has a significant impact on well-being.

Identity

Work gives us identity. When we work we have a title, a position, a clearly defined set of tasks and a label that provides information to the world about who we are, this informs us about who we are in relation to others, and in how we view ourselves. Loss of this identifier has a significant negative impact on self-esteem and self-worth, with a predictable risk to mental health. When employees are off work, it is hard for them to answer the common question: “So, what do you do?”

Any person facing unemployment experiences changes in all of these factors and is at risk for developing mental health issues. A person who already is experiencing mental health challenges, and then goes off work, may find it difficult to build steady recovery, because the essential health need of work is not present.

Many disability plans have an all-or-nothing approach to an employee’s ability to work. If employees are off work, they are deemed not able to work. If employees wish to find regular daily activity to help build their recovery, they may put their claim at risk. This approach to disability management may actually be making employees stay off work longer. The longer an employee is off work, the harder it is to return to work. Systems that do not allow employees who are on a disability claim to work, even to perform volunteer work, are preventing employees from tapping into the health benefits of working and may be contributing to needless work disability.

Employers may also have the mindset that an employee who is sick should be off work. When it comes to mental health issues, it is not best practice to use this all-or-nothing approach. The key here is for employers to have the capacity to address individual employee needs as they return to work or, better yet, have flexible processes and structures that allow employees to stay at work. Staying at work during early days of recovery could be part-time, with the disability benefit covering the balance of an employee’s income from salary.

Continuing activity, routine, social contact and identity build employee recovery and can reduce the cost of the disability claim. There is less work disruption, and continuity can be maintained for the employee and the family, the work team and the organization. This contributes to increased employee health. And healthy employees are productive and engaged employees.

The Best Disruptive Writings Of 2013 – Health Care Edition

Clayton Christensen famously coined the term “disruptive innovation” to describe “simple business applications that relentlessly move up market, eventually displacing established competitors.” Disruption is not just change; it is change that gores somebody’s ox. There has never been a year like 2013 for disruptive writing about health care. Here are five “oxen” gored by the best of that writing.

Gored Ox One: The Idea That Someone Else Pays The Bills

The first salvo of the year was David Goldhill’s highly controversial book, Catastrophic Care: How American Health Care Killed My Father – and How We Can Fix It. Goldhill had the audacity to question an assumption accepted as a truism by both proponents and opponents of Obamacare: the notion that Americans can’t pay for their own health care without some kind of health coverage. Goldhill suggests that our nation’s reliance on third-party payors like health plans, Medicare and Medicaid has created – not alleviated – the burdensome problems of cost and bad quality that plague health care, and that we could run a better health care system without them. (Disclosure: Goldhill sits on the voluntary board of my nonprofit, The Leapfrog Group, though Leapfrog isn’t associated with his book).

Goldhill wasn’t the only one asking the impertinent question, “What if you paid your own medical bills directly?” Time published a powerful story by Steven Brill, Bitter Pill: Why Medical Bills are Killing Us, which points out the bizarre oddities of what goes on behind the scenes when the checks are written to pay for patient care. Bills for the same procedure vary tenfold, but few health plans actually pay the full bill. Elisabeth Rosenthal’s reporting in the New York Times pointed out the same bizarre pricing phenomena in her remarkable series on the varying charges hospitals record for their services.

The business community took note of these questions about who pays the bills, since they traditionally pay most of them. A study by S. Eappen and colleagues in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that commercially insured patients were charged an extra $39,000 every time they suffered a surgical site infection at one hospital system. Employers wondered how they missed this enormous surcharge they paid for an undesired outcome.

Where were their health plans and consultants to alert them to this waste? They were AWOL, say Tom Emerick and Al Lewis in their brilliant book, Cracking Health Costs, which all employers seem to have on their desks these days.

The book is getting attention for its strategies on how to bypass health plans and consultants and disrupt health benefits purchasing.

Gored Ox Two: Keepers Of Secrets

The health care industry has long been shielded from the candor other industries live by. Writers this year went beyond complaining about the lack of transparency in health care — now, they are successfully calling out those who want to maintain it. Respected nurse-leader Kathleen Bartholomew writes in a piece in the Seattle Times that the lack of transparency in health care is simply unethical, and she points some fingers. In a blog for the influential policy journal Health Affairs, business leader Francois de Brantes argues that our nation’s remarkable lack of progress on quality and costs is a consequence of having no feedback loops — candid information on performance that provides continuous pressure for improvement. He calls for upending the incentives that keep health care opaque and dysfunctional. A breakthrough piece reported by Charles R. Babcock in Bloomberg News exposed the political underpinnings of why we still don’t have national data on many of the most common errors, accidents and injuries happening every day in hospitals — and he discusses the ongoing movement to preserve what little data we have. Author Rosemary Gibson, one of the decade’s most influential health care writers, writes in a memorable Huffington Post blog, “The military counts its dead and wounded even though politicians would prefer to hide the truth.” When we count the dead from medical errors, she says, we could fill Arlington National Cemetery in nine months.

One writer did try to quantify the problem – John T. James, a father and NASA toxicologist who tragically lost his son to medical errors. In a widely discussed piece published by the peer-reviewed Journal of Patient Safety, he used a scientific method developed by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement to estimate how many people die each year from hospital errors. The dismaying answer: anywhere from 200,000 to 420,000 – in other words, as many people as the population of Miami.

Gored Ox Three: The Passive Patient

The Hollywood-inspired idea of the patient as quiet recipient of physician infallibility is officially over. Patients don’t just do what they are told; they expect to make choices. Beth Howard’s cover story in AARP The Magazine – the most widely read publication in the United States – launched a firestorm with its advice for patients on protecting yourself during a hospital stay, including which hospitals are safest and what to look for in a hospital room.

Crystallizing this era of the disruptive new patient is its leading sage, Dave deBronkart, coauthor of Let Patients Help! Survivor of Stage 4 kidney cancer, deBronkart has a popular TED talk and delivers speeches throughout the world arguing that patients should serve as active members of the team delivering care, a job that includes supplying the wisdom and knowledge physicians and nurses don’t have. The emergence of this new patient cannot come soon enough, as evidenced in a widely discussed report published by the nonprofit Childbirth Connection, Listening to Mothers III: Pregnancy and Birth. The report shows the results of a Gallup survey of women who had recently given birth and reveals a stunning number of maternity patients whose wishes were ignored or manipulated, to the detriment of the women and their babies.

Among the most disruptive writers of 2013 are physicians who found themselves – or their families – on the wrong side of the hospital bed. Dr. Bob Wachter told a fascinating story of his mother’s stay in his own hospital (The University of California San Francisco Medical Center), candidly weighing some of the positive aspects of the care she received with the negatives that caused his family distress. Dr. Ashish Jha talked movingly about his father’s hospital stay, recounting with alarm three errors averted only because Jha happened to be in the room.

Gored Oxen Four: Conventional Wisdom About Delivering Care

The role of the patient has changed and so has the practice of medicine and nursing. Hollywood took note of one passionate nurse writer, Sandy Summers, and her colleagues, whose blog on the fascinating website http://www.truthaboutnursing.org analyzes media portrayals of nursing practice. Summers points out how TV depicts physicians performing tasks nurses actually do in real practice and generally portrays nurses as incompetent, unprofessional and/or none-too-bright. This hurts patients, she says, since the vast majority of care patients receive comes from nurses, and we need the best people on the job. Her passion had a direct impact this year, influencing advertiser choices and prompting talks with producers of problematic programs.

Physicians, too, are raising eyebrows by asking impolite questions about their practice. Atul Gawande’s article in the New Yorker asked why providers don’t always do the right thing in their day-to-day practice. It’s not malice, he says; it’s human nature. The piece explores lessons from international public health on a specific peer-education strategy that works to change practice patterns.

Another piece of conventional wisdom stood on its head in 2013 came from the University of Michigan’s John Birkmeyer and his colleagues, concerning surgical skill and its implications for patients. The study in The New England Journal of Medicine prompted tumultuous debate in the surgical suite when it demonstrated widespread variation in the skill of surgeons performing the same surgery. The study also suggested that skill level correlated with complication rates, raising significant new questions about what surgeons and hospitals can do to improve outcomes in health care.

But it’s not enough to identify and test new innovations for delivering care better; if they work, they must be hard-wired into practice, says Paul Plsek in his book, Accelerating Health Care Transformation with Lean and Innovation: The Virginia Mason Experience. He describes how the Virginia Mason Medical Center applied principles of lean manufacturing to balance the seemingly contradictory objectives of expanding innovation and improving adherence to the routine.

Gored Ox Five: Sacred Cows Of Public Health

Almost everyone agrees that the best strategy for improving Americans’ health would be to prevent people from needing health care in the first place. But as these writers demonstrated in their powerful arguments, beware the easy answers.

Does more health coverage mean better health? Not necessarily. A study of the impact of Medicaid in Oregon found that coverage had no impact on emergency room visits or health status (though it did relieve financial stress, an important advantage).

Does employee wellness save money? Not really. That was the reluctant conclusion of Rand researchers in a shocking study: Employee wellness programs did not appear to save money nor measurably improve health status. For more thoughts on the topic, The Health Care Blog’s series by Al Lewis and Vik Khanna is also worth following. The blog posts have prompted employee backlash and even a call for revocation of the C. Everett Koop award for a wellness program with questionable outcomes.

Should we cut the fat to fight obesity? Maybe not. A summary in the British Medical Journal of the research on obesity is prodding the nutrition science community in new directions. The exhaustive research overview by science journalist Gary Taubes found that most of the assumptions and guidelines we rely on are not supported by research, and policymakers ought to rethink our approach to the problem from the bottom up. Among the surprising observations: There’s no evidence that saturated fat is the culprit, and attempts to eliminate it from the diet may have accelerated the obesity epidemic.

Optimism For The New Year

I am confident that health care is headed in the right direction as we welcome 2014, thanks in no small part to the courage and eloquence of these disruptive writers.

This post first appeared on Forbes.com.