Tag Archives: GIA

Model for Collaboration and Convergence

The Global Insurance Accelerator, based in Des Moines, Iowa, has just participated in the fourth Global Insurance Symposium. Two of the big takeaways are that the insurtech movement is maturing, and there is indeed convergence happening between the traditional industry and the entrepreneurial startups that have new ideas and business models. For the insurance industry to advance, there must be a great deal of collaboration between all types of participants in the marketplace. The GIA represents a great example of how this collaboration can be facilitated.

Since its inception, the GIA has promoted collaboration instead of disruption. There is a clear focus on insurtechs and their potential to bring transformative ideas to the industry, but not with the objective of displacing the existing industry players. The model is designed to look for mutual benefit for insurers and insurtech startups. Insurance companies, regulators, investors, academia and other industry experts like SMA are actively involved with insurtechs to guide and support them as they mature.

See also: Insurance Coverage Porn  

The idea is that there is a win-win situation when the strengths of the traditional industry (capital, regulatory experience, scale, risk knowledge, etc.) can be blended with the strengths of insurtechs. The startups bring an entrepreneurial spirit, speed, innovation and new business models to the game. The best ways to partner and take advantage of these combinations require hard work and are enhanced by facilitating organizations like the GIA.

As the transformation of the insurance industry continues, more and more insurers are seeking to actively partner with insurtechs, leverage emerging technologies and institutionalize innovation. At the same time, the insurtech community in general is maturing and has a greater understanding of the insurance industry and the need to collaborate than it had a couple of years ago. This evolving formula creates the potential to provide new ways to deliver the customer experience, improve operational efficiencies and assist customers in risk management and wealth accumulation, resulting in success for insurers, insurtechs, and other market participants.

6 Minutes of History From 2016

We knew that 2016 would be big.

To capture the flavor of the pace and magnitude of change, I wrote a series of blogs where I likened the dramatic shifts in insurance technology to what happened during the original Italian Renaissance, when education, money, art and science combined to create quantum leaps forward and redefined trade and the economy, the social scene and technological advancement.

So here we are at the end of 2016, and I think we can make a case that 2016 was not only pivotal and groundbreaking but that it was historic on the scale of a Renaissance. At no time in the history of insurance can we find one year that includes this many game-changing events AND a rapid pace of continuing advancement.

My thinking is that if the 525,000 minutes of 2016 were actually historic, then perhaps they deserve their own six-minute look back. To keep things short, I’ve split the 2016 trends into one-minute discussions.

Insurtech — From independent ideas to industry-wide imperatives

Do you remember where you were when you first heard the term “insurtech”? Its first connotations were regarding those out-in-the-stratosphere ideas from independent tech and insurance startups as an extension of fintech regarding important-but-not-disruptive ideas in insurance. You may have heard the term “insurtech” in 2015, but it certainly went mainstream in 2016 as its own vertical focus separate from fintech.

Conversations around insurtech grew, but, more importantly, the influx of capital that advanced the proliferation of startups and greenfields based on new tech capabilities and business model disruption were unprecedented — bringing insurtech from its fintech roots into a completely mainstream, independent, industry-wide wave of innovation. Many traditional insurers and reinsurers hopped on the insurtech wave and showed interest in capturing their own slices of the creative pie. From accelerators like the Silicon Valley Insurance Accelerator (SVIA), Global Insurance Accelerator (GIA) and Plug and Play to the first InsureTech Connect meeting in Las Vegas in October with more than 1,500 executives in attendance, insurtech became the “hottest” thing in the industry, giving insurers of all sizes and lines of business pause to consider their strategies. Even S&P recognized the impact of insurtech as having “a complementary place in the traditional insurance world, despite remaining uncertainty in the industry about how it will function on a wide scale.”

See also: The Insurance Renaissance, Part 5  

The insurance industry may never have had this much activity, excitement and concern on the promise and potential of insurance disruption and reinvention.  From the launch of Lemonade, Slice, Haven Life and more insurers and MGAs, the shift to a customer-centric rather than product-centric view is creating a customer experience not unlike the Amazon experience. 2017 will continue to see existing insurers and reinsurers looking to stand up a new brand and business model to capture the next generation of customers and position for growth.

Emerging technology engages insurers

What emerging technologies are we seeing as having made an impact in 2016 with real operational impact? There is artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning. There are new sensors and their ability to capture the unseen aspects of operation and life. Protective technologies in vehicles, property and health are growing. There is live streaming data and video from smart phones and drones. Data’s organizational and visual capabilities are improving with new tools.

We could drone on.

But the reality is that the mobile, connected and ethereal digital world is using real-time data to gain insight and manage, reduce or eliminate risk in the physical world to a greater degree than ever before. There used to be “an app for that.” Now, there’s a sensor for everything on the Internet of Things. The world is fast becoming an omni-channel portal into daily life. The distance from “emerging technology” to mainstream tech usage is measured in months, not years, shattering Moore’s Law.

Emerging technologies span a diverse realm for insurers — if you consider that new technology can be worn on a wrist, flown pilotless through the sky or operate entirely within the digital networks of processors and servers. It’s no wonder that an insurance renaissance is in full swing. The space age has given way to the digital age, where it seems like anything may be possible — it just takes imagination, creativity and thinking outside the traditional box. Digital technologies have penetrated previously untapped data mines, allowing machine failure to be predicted and prevented; human risk to be captured and calculated; and insurer risk to be managed, mitigated and eliminated, creating a new value proposition, new products and new services for customers.

New and innovative businesses launches

Disruption makes use of plug-and-play ideas and technologies. Traditional insurance organizations were tightly wound balls of string, operating everything within that ball. Connections were immovable. Processes attempted to be neat and tidy, but they were always struggling with the “messiness” of adaptation. Today’s insurtech resembles Legos in insurtech’s ability to fulfill conceptual opportunities. Imagine a pile of sensors, another pile of devices and yet another “pile” of data streams. Then ask yourself, “What can your mind dream up today?” In 2016, businesses were busy dreaming up enough disruptions to disturb the sleeping giants of insurance.

Slice made a mobile app that integrates with a hybrid homeowner/commercial product. Lemonade used an AI bot to act as agent on a peer-to-peer insurance platform. Haven Life (launched in 2015 but entered 33 new states in 2016) reconsidered how data streams could improve the life underwriting experience for term life.  And then there were new distribution options with companies like Ask Kodiak, Insurify and PolicyGenius — to name a few — deconstructing and redefining the insurance value chain/business model.

Just like building with Legos, there seem to be no end to the combinations of startup and greenfield businesses that can launch using new business models, technologies and great ideas across all aspects of the insurance value chain to meet new customer needs, expectations and demands. This is one area where 2017 will certainly trump 2016 — we may only be seeing the beginning of the innovation wave — but expanding from venture-capital-backed to existing insurers standing up their own greenfield and startup businesses.

Reinsurers invest in insurtech and startups

With the reinsurance market having excess capital, reinsurers took big moves to be major players in insurtech — from investing in technology companies to new startup insurance and MGA businesses. In addition, many are looking at all the disruption around and within insurance and developing, incubating and testing new insurance products to take to market, either directly or through customers or partners.

Consider reinsurers’ investment in Trov, Lemonade, Root and Slice; Munich Re’s investment and focus on mobility and autonomous vehicles; or XL Group and the establishment of XL Innovate, a specialized venture capital fund pursuing investments in financial technology, new opportunities for insurance underwriting and related analytics, globally. Swiss Re, Hannover Re, Odyssey Re, Maiden Re and others are rapidly making moves as well.  Consistently, these investments are in new operational models, new products or meeting new risks — creating a path to underserved or new markets.

See also: Insurtech: One More Sign of Renaissance  

As noted in a recent article, all this insurtech activity is raising the expectation on the importance of reinsurance capital to support new business models and back technology startups. In the process, insurtech startups are looking to disrupt the risk to capital value-chain in insurance by deconstructing and collapsing the value chain and by cutting out primary carriers or brokers, as well as costs, and placing the risk directly with reinsurers, leveraging unused capital. We expect to see increased activity from reinsurers that will likely begin to look at partnering with existing insurers/customers to collaborate on new products and with emerging technologies or by standing up a new brand or greenfield, continuing the deconstruction of the traditional insurance value chain.

Cloud goes mainstream

In 2016, the case for core system platform in the cloud reached the tipping point — from a nice-to-have to a must-have. Its logic has grown as capabilities have improved and cost pressures have increased. Though cost is a consideration and modern functionality is important, rapid industry change is fueling a renaissance in insurance models. The startup insurer or the greenfield insurance concept needs a system solution built for rapid deployment. New products often need new processes, making cloud capabilities a catalyst for creative product development. Nothing can make an insurer feel more cutting edge than moving from idea to rollout in the short timeframes that cloud solutions provide.

Many insurers are taking advantage of the same pay-as-you-use principles as consumers themselves. They are sharing system solutions with cloud-based technology. They are paying as they grow, with agreements that allow them to pay per policy or pay based on premiums. They are using data-on-demand relationships for everything from medical evidence to geographic data and credit scoring. They use technology partners and consultants in an effort to not waste time, capital, resources and budgets.

Insurers are rapidly moving to a pay-as-they-use world, building pay-as-they-need insurance enterprises. This is especially true for greenfields and startups, where a large part of the economic equation is an elegant, pay-as-you-grow technology framework. They can turn that framework into a safe testing ground for innovative concepts without the fear of tremendous loss, while having the ability grow if the concepts are wildly successful. The window of opportunity is open to insurers that wish to prepare their business models, products, processes and systems to embrace the pay-as-you-go culture

This makes cloud a nearly-universal solution, fitting the needs of both startups and traditional insurers with plans for growth and expansion. In 2016, cloud became a mainstream option — an imperative for insurers needing a competitive edge.

Perspectives on the Pace of Change

The world recently lost John Glenn, a famous American astronaut and long-time U.S. senator. Glenn was born in 1921, only 18 years after the Wright Brothers tested flights at Kitty Hawk. He lived to pilot jets, was the first person to orbit the earth in a spacecraft, then later flew on two Space Shuttle missions at the age of 77. His life is a great example of the growing pace of change — in a world that moved from mechanization to digitization.

See also: A Renaissance, or Just Upheaval?  

Yet as much as changed in Glenn’s lifetime, today’s advancements are eclipsing all of them in pace and disruption. The systems that create knowledge through data and analysis are truly powerful forces that will ignite perpetual improvement and a new world of connected living. Insurance, once concerned with risk management on a large scale, will be focused on learning and understanding risk down to an individual policy-level, with a craving for more knowledge as it becomes available. If 2016 proved to be an insurance renaissance fueled by insurtech, it is very likely that 2017 will provide us with an even greater shift in the midst of an industry rebirth.

How much will change?

We have all of 2017 to find out!

Observations From InsurTech Week

InsurTech Week 2016 hosted by the Global Insurance Accelerator in Des Moines was a great experience. It is quite interesting to see the energy, excitement, new ideas and investment in the insurance industry. Brian Hemesath and his team at the GIA have done a great job of harnessing this activity and being a positive force for change in the industry.

There are two themes I would like to highlight. The first is that the ingenuity and sheer variety of the startups is astounding – and will ultimately be a great thing for the industry. The second theme, and perhaps the more subtle one, is that there is a collegial atmosphere and a common sense of purpose about the role of insurance in society and business.

See also: Insurtech Has Found Right Question to Ask  

Variety and Ingenuity

The 11 insurtech startups participating in this InsurTech Week are a microcosm of the larger movement. A few examples are illustrative.

  • Abaris – an innovative, direct-to-consumer solution for retirement planning, starting with income annuities.
  • Insure A Thing – an idea for a revolutionary new business model for insurance that includes making payments in arrears (post-claim).
  • Denim – a social media ad platform for insurance with a vision to ultimately reimagine marketing and distribution.
  • ViewSpection – a mobile app for DIY property inspections to help to inexpensively provide more information to agents and underwriters.

The other participants also had innovative solutions for various lines of business and addressed key business issues in insurance today. They are: Ask Kodiak, Gain Compliance, Montoux, InsureCrypt, Elagy, CoverScience and Superior Informatics.

Some are in the early stages. Some originated outside North America and may or may not enter the market here. Some may not even be approved by regulators in their current form. But that is true of the broader set of the hundreds of insurtech companies that are active today.

The main point is that there is a great deal of innovation here, and many of these companies will play a role in the evolution of insurance, one way or another.

Collegial Atmosphere

The founders and investors in insurtech companies certainly desire to make money. Insurers that are engaging with these firms hope to gain competitive advantage. But in keeping with the culture of the insurance industry, there is also a great atmosphere of collaboration and even a sense that there is a higher purpose.

I don’t want to sound too dramatic, but there is a sense of altruism here – a sense that there are great opportunities to make the world a better place. Many of the insurtech companies see opportunities to improve safety in homes, in businesses, in factories and on the roads. The potential to significantly reduce accidents and deaths is tangible. Providing new services and capabilities to enhance lifestyles, improving individual well-being and just making it easier for customers to do business with the industry are also common purposes.

There is a spirit of cooperation among insurers, insurtech and other industry players, even in cases where companies are competitors. Not to criticize other industries, but insurance is about a lot more than selling a widget and making a buck.

See also: Calling all insurtech companies – Innovator’s Edge delivers marketing muscle and social connections

A Bright Industry Future

Overall, I believe this is cause for optimism for the insurance industry. It is not easy to transform from today’s business models, processes and systems into a future that embraces all the new ideas coming from insurtech. But many in the industry are now actively involved in building strategies, experimenting with new ideas and technologies, launching ventures and generally being willing to think differently.

While many industries are being disrupted, insurance is more likely to morph into a better version of itself, with incumbent players learning from and partnering with new players.

A Word With Shefi: At Telematic

This is part of a series of interviews by Shefi Ben Hutta with insurance practitioners who bring an interesting perspective to their work and to the industry as a whole. Here, she speaks with Marti Ryan and Tom Yates at Telematic.

To see more of the “A Word With Shefi” series, visit her thought leader profile. To subscribe to her free newsletter, Insurance Entertainment, click here.

Describe Telematic in 50 words or less:

Telematic is a SaaS platform that creates personalized pricing models based on driving behavior, mobile phone usage and lifestyle behaviors. It offers insurance companies a way to more accurately price risk, yet more importantly it’s a new marketing channel for a more personalized insurance experience.

Why Telematic?

[Marti] Because usage-based insurance (UBI) makes sense; it’s where insurance is moving; and it’s a good problem for us to solve as a team. Tom was working for a top carrier and saw how difficult it was to execute a dongle-based telematics program and realized that mobile would most likely replace the dongle/hardware solution, so he went home and built it for a year.

[Tom] Marti has over 10 years of market research experience making cities sticky for the next generation. Together, we can make insurance sticky.

Describe your typical client:

We are in the B2B space targeting small to mid-sized, forward-thinking carriers that are looking to explore UBI and are willing to do something different and stand out.

Biggest challenge:

Convincing insurance companies that telematics is a play toward a one-to-one relationship with their customers, rather than an extra tool to price risk. The space is crowded with several companies focused on actuarial, B2C and fleets, but then again that’s an indication of the role this technology has in the currently evolving insurance value chain. Our solution brings in a different approach to the space, one that creates a new marketing channel using 17 years of combined insurance experience to leverage mobile in an engaging way for the next generation.

Who has been supportive of your cause?

Co-Manager at Wisconsin Investment Partners Bob Wood has been a champion, Brian Worden CEO of TeamSoft, Liz Eversol from SOLOMO Technology, Tera Johnson of the UW-Extension Small Business Development Center programming in Madison and, of course, our families.

Why did you decide to take part in the Global Insurance Accelerator?

[Marti] The timing of our start-up lent itself well to an accelerator program that took place in the spring. I’m new to the accelerator scene but understand the huge value it can offer when the right circumstances align to the right program. We had applied to a Madison-based program, and in doing so we broadened our application to the Midwest market. GIA proved to be the perfect fit for us given its insurance focus and our goals; we’ve made connections and built relationships within the GIA network that will help us get Telematic to where it needs to be.

If not for Telematic, what would you be doing?

[Marti] Most likely doing three to four other things; working with the B-Corp group to help B-Corps tell their story via B The Change Media and continuing to provide business planing and consulting for the food industry, including a non-profit, kitchen incubator (FEED Kitchens) and a local restaurant kitchen buildout to allow scaling a meal preparation and delivery business using organic, local and gluten-free ingredients.

[Tom] Working as a software engineer for another SaaS startup.

Best life lesson:

Never give up and keep asking the right questions to the right people.

What are you most excited about with respect to Telematic?

The opportunities that are in front of us are outstanding. We’re certain we’ve got a shot at being a partner for our target market, and, because we’re in the GIA, we’re well positioned to support Midwest-based carriers.

Venture Capital and Tech Start-ups

Unicorns – to some they are just mythical creatures of lore. To today’s tech world, a unicorn is a pre-IPO tech start-up with a billion-dollar market value. These are the companies driving innovation, technology and disruption in every corner of every business, and their impact is truly being felt across the insurance industry.

The number of unicorns is as elusive as the creatures themselves, as the herd is growing rapidly.

“Fortune counts more than 80 unicorns today, but more appear with each passing week. Some even received their horns, so to speak, as the magazine went to press. And they’re getting bigger — there are now at least eight ‘decacorns,’ unicorns valued at $10 billion or more. So much for being mythical.” — Fortune

Recognizing the powerful sway that unicorns have over new technologies, business models and more, insurers are now getting into the unicorn game themselves. They are identifying technology start-ups that can transform insurance and are becoming venture capitalists to tap into this great potential for creating the next generation of insurance.

Different models and approaches are being used to identify, assess and influence these companies’ offerings. By understanding the benefits of outside-in thinking, insurers are finding ways to leverage these innovations. Some insurers are partnering with leading technology firms. Some of the large insurers are setting up their own venture capital firms. Still others are creating consortia to fund new start-ups to help accelerate innovation.

Insurers and Unicorns

The following are a few examples of new partnerships in 2015; the trend is continuing;

AXA– In February 2015, AXA announced the launch of AXA Strategic Ventures, a €200M fund to boost technology start-ups focused on customer acquisition, climate change, travel insurance and more. The goal is to advance AXA’s digital and customer strategy by connecting with new technologies, new solutions,and new ways of thinking. The company anticipates the fund will complement AXA’s major operating investments, across all entities, into research and digital developments that will help transform how customers experience AXA.

XL Insurance – On April 1, 2015, XL Insurance announced the formation of a venture capital fund, XL Innovate, to support insurance technology start-ups, with a focus on developing new capabilities in the insurance sector. XL indicated that this effort would extend its capabilities in existing markets and give it new opportunities to address some of the most pressing and complex risk problems in the global economy. In addition, XL sees it as a critical element to driving focus on innovation forward while securing relevance in the future.

Global Insurance Accelerator – In February 2015, a group of seven Iowa-based insurers announced the formation and launch of the Global Insurance Accelerator (GIA), an insurance accelerator for start-ups. The start-ups receive $40,000 in seed money from the pool to create a minimum viable product to present to the Global Insurance Symposium. The insurers involved believe that the accelerator program will bring potential innovation and technology insights to the insurance industry.

The Future

Innovation, technology and the need to be future-ready are fueling today’s unicorns and their capital supporters rapidly expanding the herd. In turn, these new business models and market leaders are spawning challenges and opportunities for all companies.

Today’s forward-thinking insurance companies are running their businesses while simultaneously creating their futures as Next-Gen insurers. It’s critical to recognize the power and benefits of innovation and the role that unicorns play in planning for tomorrow.

This is a decisive time as Next-Gen insurers emerge along with their unicorns to disrupt and redefine insurance and competitive advantage. What is your company’s approach to leverage and experiment with emerging technologies, start-ups and unicorns to fuel the potential and enable future market leadership?