Tag Archives: Genworth

How to Take a Bold Approach to Growth

In today’s insurance environment, victory belongs to the bold. Margins are under pressure, and competition is heating up; insurers can no longer afford to sit on businesses that are under-performing or sub-scale.

By taking a portfolio approach to their businesses, insurers can start to assess the value and performance of their assets to make bold decisions on whether to grow or go (build or leave the business).

Time for bold decisions

Facing continued low interest rates, growing rate pressures in the property and casualty (P&C) sector and high levels of competition in both the P&C and life sectors, insurers will see margins under pressure for the near future.

Not surprisingly, most have already undertaken massive cost-reduction initiatives. Now, with little room left to cut, some are starting to take a more critical and strategic view of their business as a whole.

Our experience suggests that insurers need to take bold action and make difficult decisions now if they hope to create shareholder value and grow their business. The reality is that too many insurers are carrying businesses that are sub-scale, underperforming or simply distracting for management.

See Also: What is Your 2016 Playbook for Growth?

To help organizations assess their businesses and local operations, we have developed a diagnostic tool that segments businesses in the following way:

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Taking a portfolio view

We firmly believe that there are significant opportunities to help insurers enhance shareholder value by taking a portfolio view of their assets. And, in doing so, insurance organizations should be able to make clear decisions about whether to go (i.e., leave those markets and businesses that do not meet the strategic objectives of the organization) or grow (i.e., committing to targeted investment to drive transformational change and improvement initiatives
that will allow the business to compete effectively).

Indeed, by looking at non-core businesses as a portfolio of assets, insurance executives should be able to properly assess each businesses’ strategic fit, performance and synergies, which, in turn, will enable them to identify opportunities to improve the business through portfolio realignment.

Taking a portfolio view will also provide insurance executives with the insight needed to prepare a fix, close or sell strategy that drives a clear approach for non-core assets and then move through to a robust execution plan with appropriate governance.

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GO: A bespoke approach to divestment

In those cases where the assessment process leads to the decision to go, insurance executives will need to develop a smart divestment strategy for the business. Interestingly, our experience suggests that the divestment process has evolved considerably over the past decade.

Whereas in the past, the normal approach to selling a business involved rigid auction processes based on standard checklists and documents such as information memoranda and vendor due diligence reports, most now recognize that this approach may not maximize value.

Instead, insurers are now taking a more bespoke and focused approach to divestment that is largely influenced by four key factors:

— economic conditions
— sellers taking control
— wider buyer populations
— business model changes

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GROW: More than just scale

Insurers need to have sufficient optionality and diversification
to respond to a rapidly changing business environment. And while not all divisions and local operations need to be market-leading, they do need to demonstrate how they can make a contribution to the overall strategic ambitions of the organization.

For some, the answer will come in the form of inorganic growth within their sub-scale businesses. For others, targeted investments to support product growth initiatives or new distribution arrangements offer a lower-risk solution.

However, while many deals have been driven recently by organizations with a (fully understandable) strong focus on costs and efficiency, we often find that scale, in itself, is not a good enough reason to support a deal. Indeed, we believe that acquisitions must also bring complementary capabilities (such as new expertise in specific product lines, increased geographical reach or new distribution models) to create a sustainable platform for future growth.

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GROW: Responding to a changing environment

New technologies, changing customer demands, new ways of doing business and the threat of innovators disrupting the traditional business model are all changing the way that insurers view their portfolio of assets and businesses.

See Also: The Formula for Getting Growth Results

Clearly, understanding and capturing the benefits of innovation is a critical imperative, and there are major opportunities available for companies willing to invest in new technologies. Recognizing this, many insurers are now starting to develop new models and ways of working with the financial technology (FinTech) community.

Key takeaway: Be bold

Regardless of whether the decision is to grow or go, insurers need to start facing up to the difficult decisions that must be made about their underperforming assets.

Interestingly, our experience suggests that — in this rapidly evolving space — outright acquisition may not always be the right answer. As our recent report, The Power of Alliances, demonstrates, many insurers are now exploring the value that could be generated by investing in partnerships, alliances and innovation hubs to broaden their exposure to innovations and technology solutions.

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Simply put, insurers can no longer afford to sit on businesses that are not delivering value; they must make bold decisions and then execute on them to win in this environment.

Reprinted from (Regulatory Challenges Facing the Insurance Industry in 2016,) Copyright: 2016 KPMG LLP, a Delaware limited liability partnership and the U.S. member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. The KPMG name and logo are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International.

All information provided is of a general nature and is not intended to address the circumstances of any particular individual or entity. Although we endeavor to provide accurate and timely information, there can be no guarantee that such information is accurate as of the date it is received or that it will continue to be accurate in the future. No one should act upon such information without appropriate professional advice after a thorough examination of the facts of a particular situation.

For additional news and information, please access KPMG’s global website.

Can Long-Term Care Insurance Survive?

Why are long-term care insurance premiums rising faster than a speeding elevator? And what will become of the long-term care insurance marketplace? If you are interested in long-term care insurance, what’s going on and what may happen, read on.  If you have no interest in long-term insurance, then this is not the article you are looking for. (The next edition will take a closer look at the insurance consumer Bill of Rights).

Why Would Anyone Want Long-Term Care Insurance?

One of the largest projected expenses for the average American in retirement is medical expenses, with estimates approaching a total of $250,000.

Medicare and Medicare supplements provide coverage for medical expenses that are typically short-term or one-time, such as an annual physical, medical test or surgical procedure. Long-term care insurance provides coverage to pay the costs of service such as nursing home, in-home care and skilled nursing facilities that are not covered by Medicare or Medicare supplements. These costs are quite high—hundreds of dollars a day.  To see what the average cost of care in your area is, visit the Genworth Cost of Care page here.

The odds of needing some form of long term-care insurance can reach 50% or more, with an average claim period of two to three years (depending on the statistics you look at). According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), by 2020, about 12 million Americans will require long-term care.

See Also: What Features of Long-Term Care Should You Focus On?

Long-term care insurance premiums will typically be in the thousands of dollars a year. However, just like with any other type of insurance, it is about the leverage of protecting against a risk—a simple financial calculation: Can you afford to pay for the risk in the event of a claim out of pocket and can you afford to pay the premiums? In terms of leverage, if you have a long-term care insurance policy with a total benefit pool of $250,000 and an annual premium of $5,000, the annual premium is 2% of the total benefit pool. If 2% sounds like good leverage to you, this policy makes sense.

The Big Question: Why Are Long-Term Care Insurance Premiums Rising? 

There are multiple layers to this questions, but the main underlying factor is that the first long-term care insurance policies offered by insurance companies had unlimited benefit periods on a type of coverage where they had minimal historical data. Think about it this way: If I offered you a bet on a football game this weekend with the provision that, if you win, I’ll pay you $100, and, if I win, you’ll pay me a $1 a month for the rest of my life. Now, that’s a great bet for me if my team consists of all-pros and your team consists of benchwarmers. Without knowing who is on your team, would you make this bet? There’s no need to answer; of course you wouldn’t.  Yet this is exactly the bet insurance companies made, just with much bigger numbers. And, unsurprisingly, this business model hasn’t been profitable for them.

There are some other major factors to consider, such as the prolonged historically low-interest-rate environment where insurance companies have not been able to make their historical investment returns. (This is something that no one could have foreseen.)

Another major factor is that insurance companies counted on a certain percentage of people lapsing (terminating) their policies at some point. Again, the insurance companies made this prediction without much historical data. And guess what? Policy owners actually liked and valued the coverage they purchased, and they have kept their long-term care insurance policies in force, despite some significant rate increases.

Premiums have had to be increased because, at the end of the day, it is in everyone’s best interest for insurance companies to be profitable. If an insurance company is not profitable, it will go out of business and will not be able to pay claims, which is definitely a problem.

Rate Increase Oversight and Perspective

Rates for in-force policies have been increased and will almost certainly face future increases; older policies still are priced lower than what a current policy would cost. Premium increases on long-term-care insurance policies have to be approved, in most states, by the state insurance commissioner. When faced with a rate increase, policyholders will need to consider whether their benefit mix makes sense and fits their budget. These are the “visible” rate increases.

If you have a long-term care insurance policy with a mutual insurance company where the premium is subsidized by dividends, you may not have noticed (or been informed) of a reduced dividend scale. When an insurance company reduces its dividend scale, it does not have to get approval from anyone or disclose that it has reduced its dividends. Reduced dividends mean a higher premium. This is a hidden rate increase.

As mentioned, policies issued today have significantly higher premiums than those issued in the past. Some rate increases are attributed to companies “catching up” on premiums to get closer to current premiums they hope are more accurate. The bottom line is that insurance companies are trying to bring the premiums on older policies into line with their current pricing on new products. The closer that pricing gets, the less likely it is there will be future premium increases. So, if you have an older policy (even if you’re faced with a significant premium increase), keep in mind you’ve gotten a discount on past premiums. While that’s not comforting in the face of a premium increase, it will help put things into perspective.

Insurance departments will approve premium increases so that they are sufficient to meet anticipated claims. Any increase granted must apply equally to all policy owners from the requested class of policies, and the carrier must keep the policy in force if the premium payments are made. Changes in age or health have no bearing on the contract premiums once issued; the policy may only be canceled if premiums are not paid. Nearly all existing long-term-care insurance policies have had one or more rate increases granted.

Please keep in mind that rates on other types of insurance also increase over the years, some slowly like auto insurance and homeowners insurance and some rapidly like health insurance.  Inflation affects everything. There are no nickel candy bars any more. This is all about the value of the coverage and the leverage of your premium to the total benefit pool.

Options When You Have A Premium Increase

When you have a premium increase, you should always start by reviewing your coverage and deciding whether you still need the current coverage or whether you can make changes. For example, because the average claim period is two to three years and there is a much longer benefit period, is the trade-off in premiums for the longer benefit period worth it? It is important to understand that, once a change is made, it cannot be undone, so be sure you are comfortable with any modifications.

The following are options when you have a premium increase:

  • Pay the increased premium.
  • Reduce the daily/monthly benefit amount.
  • Increase the waiting period.
  • Shorten the benefit period.
  • Change the inflation rider 
(e.g. go from compound to simple or reduce inflation percentage from 5% to 4%).
  • Change/remove other riders.
  • Terminate the policy.
  • If your policy has a non-forfeiture benefit that allows for a “paid-up reduced benefit,” consider this option: You’ll get at least some value for the premiums you’ve paid. But remember, once you accept the option, the policy will not be reinstated. Some states are now requiring all new policies to include this feature. (It’s relatively rare in older policies.)

New Long-Term Policy Designs (Hybrid/Combination Products)

With all the issues in the traditional long-term care insurance marketplace, there are very few companies selling individual long-term care insurance policies. Instead, insurance companies have come out with whole new types of products: hybrids and combinations. For instance, you can purchase a life insurance policy or an annuity with a long-term-care insurance rider. Other options are a life insurance policy or annuity that is combined with a long-term-care policy. (Rather than the long-term-care insurance being part of the rider, it is part of the policy.)

While, in theory, these sound like great ideas, they ignore some simple facts:

  • There may be no need for life insurance or an annuity, but you will be paying for the life insurance or annuity in addition to the long-term care insurance component.
  • Some require an up-front lump-sum premium payment.
  • These policies are complex and opaque. There are multiple variables to these policies that the insurance company can change and that will affect the performance of the policy—many of which do not have to be disclosed to the policy owner and do not show up anywhere. The more complex the product, the greater the chance that something won’t work properly.

Considering that insurance companies are still working on accurately pricing long-term-care insurance products and that universal life insurance policies are having issues (see: Will Your Life Insurance Policy Terminate Before You?), it is hard to imagine that combining two problematic products will magically work out.

The big selling point for these policies is that, with a traditional long-term-care insurance policy, the policy owner does not get anything back if there is no claim made. However, there is no expectation with any other type of insurance (except for life insurance) that there is a return if a claim does not occur, and most homeowners, for example, are happy when their house doesn’t burn down even though they don’t get any payout from their insurer.

Lessons Learned and a Positive Outlook For Long-Term Care Insurance?

There is no doubt of the importance of a thriving private sector long-term-care insurance marketplace. Public policy would seem to favor long-term-care insurance paid for by the private sector.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is increasing the amount people may deduct from their tax returns this year when buying long-term-care insurance or paying monthly premiums. Check out the IRS page on long-term care Insurance premium deductibility here .

The Bipartisan Policy Center (BPC) released its first set of recommendations calling for increasing access to the private insurance market. BPC initiatives call for increasing access to the private insurance market, improving public programs such as Medicaid and pursuing a catastrophic insurance approach for individuals with significant long-term-care needs such as Alzheimer’s or a debilitating physical impairment. These proposals were developed by former U.S. Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle along with Bill Frist, another former U.S. Senate majority leader, former U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Secretary and Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson and Alice Rivlin, the former director of the Office of Management and Budget. They aim to address the needs of America’s seniors and specifically target middle- and lower-income individuals and families. Daschle said, “Today, families and caregivers are becoming impoverished by the financial demands of long-term care … Since there is no single, comprehensive solution to solve this unsustainable situation, our strategy calls for a combination of actions that could help ease the extraordinary financial burdens Americans are facing.”

If the BPC has its way, these retirement long-term-care policies would be sold on federal and state health insurance exchanges. The question is whether this can be accomplished. Part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA, aka Obamacare), the Community Living Assistance Services and Supports (CLASS) program established a national, voluntary insurance program for purchasing community living services and supports that is designed to expand options for people who become functionally disabled and require long-term help. Unfortunately, this program was abandoned because it wasn’t financially feasible.

History repeats itself

Back in the 1980s, insurance companies made similar poor product design decisions with individual disability income insurance. Unsurprisingly, claims experience was not great, and a number of companies left the marketplace. Is this sounding familiar?  The current individual disability insurance marketplace has returned with more sensible products, where the companies do full underwriting, offer benefits that are less than earnings and do not guarantee the premiums. A great read on this is: IDI Déjà Vu: Optimism For The LTCI Industry, by Xiaoge Flora Hu and Marc Glickman.

The long-term-care insurance industry is making similar changes to its products, which should buoy the marketplace. Products are being priced based on actual experience, policies are being fully underwritten and unlimited benefits are no longer available.

Smarter product design, better risk selection and a strong need should result in a solid long-term-care insurance marketplace. As America continues to age, there will be a stronger need for the coverage. It may take a few years, but there is a future for long-term-care insurance. The only real question is when.

Let me know what you think.