Tag Archives: gallup poll

The State of Ethics in Insurance

Ethical behavior is crucial to preserving not only the trust on which insurance transactions are based, but also the public’s trust in our industry as a whole. Unfortunately, the public has a relatively low opinion of our ethical standards.

For about 40 years, the Gallup Poll has asked Americans how they view the honesty and ethics of certain professions. Since 1977, no more than 15%  of respondents have said the ethics of insurance professionals are high, while no fewer than 25% have ranked us below average. Meanwhile, the ethics of accountants, bankers and lawyers have consistently rated higher.

The Institutes, a non-profit provider of professional education for the risk management and property-casualty insurance industry, has worked to educate current professionals about the importance of ethics, and to do so it provides free courses on ethical best practices. Earlier this year, the Institutes also polled members of its online community to understand their perspective on the current state of ethics in our industry, and created this infographic to summarize the results.

More than 3,000 members of the Institutes Community, an online network of insurance professionals, responded. Here are the results:

How a GOP Congress Could Fix Obamacare

Republicans are primed to take over Congress. A new FiveThirtyEight.com projection gives the GOP a 60% chance of winning the Senate this fall. And, according to RealClearPolitics, there’s virtually no chance Democrats will take the House.

If the GOP succeeds, public displeasure with Obamacare may be why. A recent poll from Bankrate.com found that more than two-thirds of voters say that Obamacare will play a role in how they vote in the coming election. Nearly half said it would influence them “in a major way.”

Of course, the next Congress has little hope of repealing Obamacare outright. The president would just issue a veto. Overriding it — though technically possible — would be difficult with an intransigent Democrat minority.

A GOP majority should instead focus on incremental reforms with bipartisan support — like tax cuts, regulatory reforms and repeal of some of Obamacare’s most unpopular mandates. That’s the most effective way for lawmakers to move our health care system toward one that puts markets and patients at its center.

Step one? Repeal Obamacare’s medical-device tax. This 2.3% excise charge on all device sales is expected to collect $29 billion over the next decade, according to government data.

Device firms are compensating by cutting jobs. Stryker, for instance, has cut 5% of its workforce — about 1,000 people. Zimmer Holdings has chopped 450 jobs. In total, Obamacare’s device tax could kill 43,000 jobs, according to Diana Furchtgott-Roth, an economist at the Hudson Institute.

Getting rid of the tax is a no-brainer. In March 2013, 79 senators — including 34 Democrats — approved a non-binding resolution calling for its repeal. It’s time to make that vote binding.

Second, a GOP-controlled Congress should strengthen health savings accounts. These financial vehicles allow patients to stow away money tax-free for medical expenses. HSAs are typically coupled with high-deductible health insurance. Patients bear the cost of routine care, and coverage kicks in when needed, like in the event of a medical emergency.

HSAs give patients a financial incentive to avoid unnecessary medical expenses. Converting someone to HSA-based insurance drops her annual health expenses by an average of 17%.

This year, 17.4 million people are enrolled in HSA-eligible plans — a nearly 14% increase over 2013. Among large employers, 36% now offer HSA/high-deductible plans, up from 14% five years ago.

Annual HSA contributions are currently capped at $3,350 for an individual and $6,550 for a family. Congress should raise them to $6,250 and $12,500, respectively. And patients with HSA coverage through the exchanges should be eligible for a one-time, $1,000 refundable tax credit to be deposited directly into their account.

Third, the new Congress should reform medical malpractice. Frivolous lawsuits and the threat of baseless litigation are increasing health costs and degrading quality of care.

Excessive malpractice suits drive “defensive” medicine, in which doctors order unnecessary procedures and tests simply to shield against accusations of negligence. This practice costs the country an estimated $210 billion every year, according to PricewaterhouseCoopers. Injecting common sense into the medical tort system would bring down that bill.

Earlier this year, the House Energy and Commerce Committee passed a bill that restricted lawsuits against doctors by, among other things, limiting non-economic damage judgments to $250,000. It was effectively ignored once it moved out of committee. Republicans should dust it off and pass it.

Finally, the GOP should repeal Obamacare’s employer mandate, which slaps midsize and large companies with a fine if they don’t provide sufficiently “robust” health coverage to full-time employees.

The mandate is destroying jobs. Employers are holding off on hiring and ratcheting back workers’ hours to avoid additional insurance costs. A Gallup poll found that 85% of businesses are not looking to hire. Nearly half cited rising healthcare costs.

There’s ample political support for repealing the employer mandate. The administration has already unilaterally — and maybe illegally — delayed its implementation. Several prominent backers have openly called for repeal.

All of these reform ideas are imminently actionable. They could find broad bipartisan backing and avoid a veto. Most importantly, they would move U.S. healthcare closer to a consumer-driven system, with patients empowered to control their own spending and market forces pushing costs down.

Responding to Needs of the Aging Workforce

Understanding the Issue

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, over the past decade, workers in the 45 year-old and over category have increased 49% and now make up 44% of the workforce. The age group over 55 has grown to 21% of the workforce. As a glimpse into the future, a 2013 Gallup poll revealed that 37% of working age respondents indicated they expect to work beyond age 65. Gallup reported that only 22% responded the same way in 2003 and only 16% in 1995. Given this projected “aging” of America’s workforce, are America’s employers prepared to effectively address the associated increase workers compensation claims?

As the population pyramids below illustrate, the aging of America is not a short-term issue. Note the diminishing dependency ratio of young to old, from 1980 to 2030 as shown in Figure 1.

Screen Shot 2016-01-16 at 11.37.02 AM

The Future is Now

The time to discuss these trends as a “having potential impact in the future” has actually passed. We need to re-orient our thinking of the aging workforce as a new constant and as “today’s reality”. The medium age of some industries is as high as 55 (agriculture) indicating a need to act.

Screen Shot 2016-01-16 at 11.37.39 AM

Table 1: Percent of workforce over 45 years of age, by industry.

At Aon, we have been studying and quantifying the impact of the aging of America on our clients. Based on our market insight, we have developed prescriptive solutions to support our clients’ needs. As you can see from the table below, the age of the workforce and population within each age band varies significantly and is in part why all employers may not experience a direct impact of this issue. Based on our client research, we believe it is imperative to quantify the impact of this issue, which in turn provides key input and metrics for helping mitigate the problem. As one client put it when shown the injury trend related to an age band of workers and type of injury driving a considerable portion of their loss time injuries, “Are you saying that by prioritizing the identification and potential for shoulder injuries I could get more return on investment from my ergonomics efforts?” The response was a simple but definitive, “yes”.

The Impact on Work-Related Injuries

Over the past three years, Aon casualty specialists have been monitoring the impact of work-related injuries to aging workers by examining workers compensation claim costs of our clients. From this research, we have identified some rather compelling trends.

One of the most concerning trends is the “current” impact on the cost of workers’ compensation. We studied $2.5 billion in workers’ compensation claims from 2007 through 2012 and found a consistently higher average cost for workers’ compensation claims for older claimants across all industry groups. For example, the 45- to 55-year-old claimants in the manufacturing industry group’s average claim cost was 52% higher than 25- to 35-year-old claimants. This trend varied in degree by industry, but only by the pitch of the slope, leaving us to look deeper into the issue and attempt to identify what was driving this cost. This issue has been under study for quite some time.

Heather Grob, Ph.D. and senior economist with Washington State Department of Labor and Industries, published materials on the concern in 2005, stating “that a random sample of Washington workers’ compensation claims from 1987-89 found that workers over age 45 were at risk of longer term disability” (Cheadle et al 1994). The study concluded that older age is the most important and consistent influence on duration of disability. While we are not breaking new ground on identifying the issue, what seems to be missing is the socialization and acceptance of the impact as well as an understanding of what we should be doing about it.

Screen Shot 2016-01-16 at 11.38.11 AM

The Birth of Ageonomics in Workers’ Compensation

In 2011, we at Aon coined the term Ageonomics to address the phenomenon of the aging workforce and the strategies that can help address increased costs and worker safety. Vicki Missar, Aon board-certified ergonomist, defines Ageonomics as the scientific discipline concerned with the interaction among aging humans and other elements of the system within which they work.

Ultimately, Ageonomics is Aon’s professional service that applies theoretical principles to designing age-specific systems to optimize the wellbeing of the aging worker while improving overall system performance. Aon’s Ageonomics practice leverages the differentiated expertise of professionals spanning such disciplines as ergonomics, wellness, benefits and safety to deliver comprehensive and very powerful solutions to the aging workforce challenges most employers are facing.

Ageonomics calibrates the absenteeism trends for the aging workforce, regardless of the bucket within which they fall. Aon analyzes the trends, from short-term disability (STD), long-term disability (LTD), workers’ compensation (WC), casual absences (CA) and Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) absences to understand claim volume, average claim duration, average cost per lost day, average cost per claim, total costs and the ultimate cost projections. In addition to the financial output, Aon calibrates the leading absence causes by program type to understand what is driving the aging employee absenteeism. This insight provides clearer diagnosis on which programs are affecting the organization the greatest and which absenteeism causes are being reported with the most frequency. Aon also reviews the internal programs to understand how the framework is aligned with the organization’s aging worker initiatives. Organizations can then develop a targeted, age-specific strategy to help not only prevent or reduce the duration associated with the respective absences, but implement preemptive programs to help keep aging workers healthy and optimize their individual productivity.

Screen Shot 2016-01-16 at 11.38.51 AM

Changes Associated with Aging

The physiological changes associated with aging occur from the moment we are born. Fast forward to age 45 and older, and the body begins to change more significantly. Depending on primary factors such as health, fitness and genetics, all of us age differently. Researchers in Finland (Ilmarinen, et. al. 1997) found a decline in what they called “workability,” with 51 years of age being the most critical point at which workability started to decrease. In addition, researchers noted that workability was shown to have a high predictive value for work disability (e.g. lower workability equals higher disability days). This means that we must now focus on the individual to understand age-related risk factors, modifiable and non-modifiable, to really address the challenges facing the aging workforce.

Physiological Changes That Can Affect Work Performance

With age comes decreased muscle strength, lower dexterity, reduced fitness level and aerobic capacity, poorer visual and auditory acuity and slower cognitive speed and function, to name a few. All of these changes can have a dramatic impact on the aging worker. For example, aging is related to the loss of muscle mass beginning at the age of 50 but becomes more dramatic at the age of 60 (Deschenes 2004). In addition to physical changes, older workers are at increased risk of disease and other ailments. These include the increased risk of obesity associated with aging, diabetes, heart disease, cancer and reduced fitness level, among others. Thus, prevention initiatives are needed to support the aging worker so that an effective, comprehensive strategy is developed. For example, if we know that muscle strength declines with age, organizations need to consider implementing safety, ergonomics and wellness programs to help build individual strength while working to reduce manual lifting, which could potentially result in injury or absence.

In the course of Aon’s Ageonomics diagnostic research, the two leading loss causes of injuries to knees and shoulders stem from strain/sprains and slip/trip/falls that can directly be attributed to reduced mobility and reduced strength, both of which can be related to an older physiology. By understanding the physical changes of an aging human and linking these changes to loss-producing trends in the data, we can develop a thoughtful strategy for increasing workability and reducing age-specific exposures in the workplace.

Screen Shot 2016-01-16 at 11.39.57 AM

Rethinking the Work Environment

After some research and discussions with other benchmarking groups (NCCI and IBI), we can begin to make some educated assumptions surrounding drivers of these increased costs. What is of interest to Aon’s Ageonomics practice is how physical changes can influence solutions to reduce injury risk and prevent absenteeism. With onset of saropenia — loss of muscle mass — comes decreased strength. Many physically demanding jobs do not factor this into the equation when developing production standards or production demands for the workforce. By age-adjusting the demands by a specified factor, for example, we can not only reduce the risk of injury but improve the long-term workability and productivity of the workforce in general.

As part of Aon’s Ageonomics methodology, each safety, ergonomics, benefits, wellness, human-resource program aligns strategies and their resulting activities around the needs of the aging worker. The ultimate objective is to develop strategies geared toward optimizing the performance of the aging worker. This can only be done when each program is assessed and refined for the aging workforce (Table 2). For example, a recent study (Ruahala, et. al. 2007) found a linear trend between increasing workload and increasing sick time among nurses. First, we know that in health care and social assistance, musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) make up 42% of cases and have a rate of 55 cases per 10,000 full-time workers. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, this rate was 56% higher than the rate for all private industries and second only to the transportation and warehousing industry. Second, given that 55% of the USA nursing workforce is age 50 or older (NCSBN &The Forum of State Nursing Workforce), conducting an Ageonomics assessment may be an important part of a strategic program to reduce sick leave, workers’ compensation injuries and overall absenteeism. Third, solutions cannot be one-dimensional, i.e., simply purchasing patient-handling equipment and hoping that will remedy the situation. Strategies must encompass the total health and wellbeing of the worker for optimal success, including a thorough review of the programs outlined in Table 2.

Screen Shot 2016-01-16 at 11.40.39 AM

last

 

Rethinking Wellness As the U.S. workplace continues to age, it is critical to rethink wellness programs. Berry et. al. (2010)5 state in the Harvard Business Review:

“Wellness programs have often been viewed as a nice extra, not a strategic imperative. Newer evidence tells a different story. With tax incentives and grants available under recent federal health care legislation, U.S. companies can use wellness programs to chip away at their enormous health care costs, which are only rising with an aging workforce.”

The article points out six pillars of an effective wellness program that can help significantly lower healthcare costs. As part of Aon’s Ageonomics practice, we analyze these pillars, including leadership, program quality, accessibility and communication of not only wellness but safety, ergonomics and other programs, to understand gaps for aging workers. By reviewing age-specific data and wellness program statistics, we can probe deeper and ultimately develop strategies to better align these programs for the aging worker. Researchers at Harvard found that participants in wellness programs are absent less often and perform better at work than their nonparticipant counterparts. Thus, structuring a wellness program around aging workers can become a way for organizations to not only retain aging workers but ensure their workability does not decline to levels that result in disabilities and workers’ compensation claims.

Conclusions

As with any workplace program, measuring success includes not only healthcare costs, but workers’ compensation costs, safety program incident rates, absenteeism and turnover rates, among other indicators. It becomes essential to align traditional silo programs and produce a synergistic, thoughtful approach to optimize any program touching an aging worker. For a copy of the full Aon white paper on which this article is based, click here.

As Obamacare's 'Compassionate' Reality Sets In, Companies 'Cruelly' Cut Health Benefits

Employees of shipping giant United Parcel Service recently got an unexpected delivery. The company announced that it would stop offering health coverage to the spouses of 15,000 workers.

UPS’s workers and their families can thank Obamacare for this special delivery. And UPS isn’t alone. American businesses are discovering each and every day that the president’s signature law will raise health costs for them and their employees in short order.

In a memo explaining the decision to employees, UPS stated that increasing medical costs “combined with the costs associated with the Affordable Care Act, have made it increasingly difficult to continue providing the same level of health care benefits to our employees at an affordable cost.”

One day before UPS’s big announcement, the University of Virginia announced that it would cut benefits for spouses who have access to health care through jobs of their own. The rationale was similar.

Delta Airlines recently revealed that Obamacare will directly increase its direct health costs by $38 million next year. After taking into account the indirect costs of the law, the company is looking at a 2014 health bill that’s $100 million higher.

Increasingly, large employers who aren’t dropping spousal health benefits are requiring their employees to pay monthly surcharges in the neighborhood of $100 per spouse.

Many small businesses are dropping family coverage altogether because they expect that Obamacare’s new tax on insurers will be passed on to them in the form of higher premiums. One Colorado-based business received notice from its insurer that the tax would increase premiums more than 20 percent.

The story is similar in Massachusetts. One new report concludes that over 45,000 small businesses in the Bay State will see premium increases in excess of 30 percent. In all, more than 60 percent of firms in the state will see their premiums go up.

Last month in California, the largest insurer for small businesses — Anthem — declared that it would not participate in the state’s small-business health insurance “marketplace,” Covered California. Only two years ago, Anthem covered one-third of small businesses in California.

Anthem’s exit represents one less choice for consumers — and a sign that competition may not be as robust in the exchanges as the Obama Administration promised.

Small businesses are responding to these higher premiums by trimming their labor costs in other ways. That’s not good news for workers.

Seventy-four percent of small employers plan to have fewer staff because of Obamacare, according to a recent U.S. Chamber of Commerce survey. Twenty-seven percent are looking to cut full-time employees’ hours, 24 percent to reduce hiring, and 23 percent to replace full time with part-time employees.

One in four small companies say that Obamacare was the single biggest reason not to hire new workers. For almost half, it’s the biggest business challenge they face.

These findings are consistent with a recent Gallup Poll showing that 41 percent of small businesses have already stopped hiring because of Obamacare. Another 19 percent intend to make job cuts because of the law.

All this tumult in the labor market is fueled by more than the increase in premiums engendered by Obamacare. The law effectively encourages companies to cut full-time jobs.

Obamacare requires employers with 50 or more workers to provide health insurance to all who are on the job for 30 or more hours per week. The law originally called for this “employer mandate” to take effect in 2014, but the Administration decided in July to delay enforcement of the mandate until 2015.

Employers are responding by doing just enough to avoid Obamacare’s dictates.

Administrators at Youngstown State University in Ohio recently told adjunct instructors, “[Y]ou cannot go beyond twenty-nine work hours a week. . . . If you exceed the maximum hours, YSU will not employ you the following year.” A week prior the Community College of Allegheny County in Pittsburgh made a similar announcement.

Hundreds of employees at Wendy’s franchises have seen their hours reduced for the same reason.

Meanwhile, companies with fewer than 50 employees are thinking twice about expanding — and thus being ensnared by Obamacare’s requirement that they provide health insurance.

The cost of each additional employee could be staggering. A firm with 51 employees that declined to provide health coverage would face $42,000 in new taxes every year — and an additional $2,000 tax for each new hire. Providing coverage, of course, would be even more expensive.

Meanwhile, as private firms large and small grapple with Obamacare-fueled cost increases, one large employer — the federal government — has been quietly exempting itself from portions of the law.

Top congressional staffers like their current benefits under the Federal Employee Health Benefits Plan (FEHBP), wherein the government pays up to 75 percent of the premiums.

But the law requires those who work in lawmakers’ personal offices to enter the exchanges. And in many cases, staffers  make too much to qualify for health insurance subsidies through the exchanges. So they’d be facing a hefty cut in their compensation.

Fearing a mass exodus of congressional staffers from Capitol Hill, the Obama Administration fudged the law to permit lawmakers’ employees to receive special taxpayer-funded subsidies of $4,900 per person and $10,000 per family.

Yet only three months ago, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) claimed that Congress wouldn’t make exceptions for itself.

President Obama no doubt knows that these congressional favors won’t go over well with ordinary Americans. So he’s called on his most popular deputy — former President Bill Clinton — to try to sell the law to the public once again.

But unless the former president can lower employer health costs with little more than the power of his words, his sales pitch will likely fall flat.

This article was first published at Forbes.com.

New AMA Classification Of Obesity: How It Affects Workers’ Compensation And Mandatory Reporting

On June 16, 2013, the American Medical Association voted to declare obesity a disease rather than a comorbidity factor. This change in classification will affect 78 million American Adults and 12 million children. The new status for obesity means that this is now considered a medical condition that requires treatment. In fact, a recent Duke University / RTI International / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study estimates 42 percent of U.S. adults will become obese by 2030.

According to the Medical Dictionary, obesity has been defined as a weight at least 20% above the weight corresponding to the lowest death rate for individuals of a specific height, gender, and age (ideal weight). Twenty to forty percent over ideal weight is considered mildly obese; 40-100% over ideal weight is considered moderately obese; and 100% over ideal weight is considered severely, or morbidly, obese. More recent guidelines for obesity use a measurement called BMI (body mass index) which is the individual's weight divided by their height squared times 703. BMI over 30 is considered obese.

The World Health Organization further classifies BMIs of 30.00 or higher into one of three classes of obesity:

  • Obese class I = 30.00 to 34.99
  • Obese class II = 35.00 to 39.99
  • Obese class III = 40.00 or higher

People in obese class III are considered morbidly obese. According to a 2012 Gallup Poll, 3.6% of Americans were morbidly obese in 2012.

The decision to reclassify obesity gives doctors a greater obligation to discuss with patients their weight problem and how it's affecting their health while enabling them to get reimbursed to do so.

According to the Duke University study, obesity increases the healing times of fractures, strains and sprains, and complicates surgery. According to another Duke University study that looked at the records for work-related injuries:

  • Obese workers filed twice as many comp claims.
  • Obese workers had seven times higher medical costs.
  • Obese workers lost 13 times more days of work.
  • Body parts most prone to injury for obese individuals included lower extremities, wrists or hands, and the back. Most common injuries were slips and falls, and lifting.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said the costs to U.S. businesses related to obesity exceed $13 billion each year.

Furthermore, a 2011 Gallup survey found that obese employees account for a disproportionately high number of missed workdays. Also earlier National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI) research of workers' compensation claims found that claimants with a comorbidity code indicating obesity experience medical costs that are a multiple of what is observed for comparable non-obese claimants. The NCCI study demonstrated that claimants with a comorbidity factor indicating obesity had five times longer indemnity duration than claimants that were not identified as obese.

Prior to June 16, 2013, the ICD code for comorbidity factors for obesity in workers' was ICD-9 code 278. This is related to obesity-related medical complications, as opposed to the condition of obesity. Now the new ICD codes will indicate a disease, or condition of obesity which needs to be medically addressed. How will this affect work-related injuries?

Instead of obesity being a comorbitity issue, it can now become a secondary claim. If injured workers gain weight due to medications they are placed on as a result of their work-related injury or if an injured worker gains weight since they cannot exercise or keep fit because of their work-related injury and their BMI exceeds 30, they are considered obese and are eligible for medical industrially related treatment. In fact, the American Disability Act Amendment of 2008 allows for a broader scope of protection and the classification of obesity as a disease means that an employer needs to be cognizant that if someone has been treated for this disease for over 6 months then they would be considered protected under the American Disability Act Amendment.

Consider yet another factor: with the advent of Mandatory Reporting (January 1, 2011) by CMS that is triggered by the diagnosis (diagnosis code), the new medical condition of obesity will further make the responsible party liable for this condition and all related conditions for work-related injuries and General Liability claims with no statute of limitations. It is vital to understand that, as of January 1, 2011, Medicare has mandated all work-related and general liability injuries be reported to CMS in an electronic format. This means that CMS has the mechanism to look back and identify work comp related medical care payments made by Medicare. This is a retroactive statute and ultimately, it will be the employer and/or insurance carrier that will be held accountable.

The carrier or employer could pay the future medical cost twice — once to the claimant at settlement and later when Medicare seeks reimbursement of the medical care they paid on behalf of the claimant. This is outside the MSA criteria. The cost of this plus the impact of the workers' compensation costs as well as ADAA issues for reclassification of obesity for an employer and carrier are incalculable.

The solution is baseline testing so that only claims that arise out of the course and scope of employment (AOECOE) are accepted. If a work-related claim is not AOECOE and can be proved by objective medical evidence such as a pre- and post-assessment and there is no change from the baseline, then not only is there no workers' compensation claim, there is no OSHA-recordable claim, and no mandatory reporting issue.

A proven example of a baseline test for musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) cases is the EFA-STM program. EFA-STM Program begins by providing baseline injury testing for existing employees and new hires. The data is only interpreted when and if there is a soft tissue claim. After a claim, the injured worker is required to undergo the post-loss testing. The subsequent comparison objectively demonstrates whether or not an acute injury exists. If there is a change from the baseline site specific treatment, recommendations are made for the AOECOE condition ensuring that the injured worker receives the best care possible.

Baseline programs such as the EFA-STM ensure that the employee and employer are protected and take the sting out of the new classification by the AMA for obesity.