Tag Archives: gabi

Why Isn’t Customer Experience Better?

Whether you’re browsing an article about the latest trends in insurtech or listening to a panel of insurance industry disrupters discussing customer acquisition strategies, it’s hard to avoid references about emerging technologies such as machine learning, artificial intelligence, chatbots and data analytics. But, have these digital advancements truly transformed the experience for customers shopping for insurance? Are insurers, agencies and consumers benefiting from such enhancements in technology?

Arguably, the answer is yes. The insurance buying experience has evolved dramatically in the last decade, and insurers, their agents and consumers have all benefited. However, when we examine the underlying products and the various touchpoints throughout the customer journey, we can see there are significant opportunities for improvement.

Insurance Shopping: Consumer shopping patterns and expectations have changed in all industries, and insurance is no exception. The enormous dollars spent by top insurers are pushing more consumers to start their shopping process in a digital format, where speed and accuracy are paramount in keeping customers engaged. Consumers have become accustomed to choosing from multiple product options and to one-click shopping, but replicating an Amazon experience in the insurance industry is extremely challenging.

For one thing, insurance products are highly complex and regulated, and premiums can change based on a multitude of variables that are not immediately transparent to consumers. Variables such as: age, coverage limits, credit, driving history, prior claims or age of home can dramatically affect eligibility or policy premium. And while these factors are key data points for underwriting, verification of these inputs often leads to lengthy question sets and inaccuracies in pricing at point of sale and beyond. Then there are the costs associated with verifying reports such as credit, MVR, CLUE and prior carrier through third party vendors, which add friction and cost in the shopping process.

These are among the challenges that a few digitally focused, independent insurance agencies such as Gabi Insurance are aiming to overcome. Such digital platforms can simplify the quote process while representing both traditional carriers and newer entrants to the market like Clearcover. Digital agencies stay engaged with the customer throughout the life of the policy and may help reduce the cost of third-party reports, which are currently passed on to consumers.

See also: Is Insurtech a Game Changer? It Sure Is  

Beyond the Quote: While the point-of-sale experience is critical in effective customer acquisition, the entire customer journey — meaning all the touchpoints along the way — help maintain customer loyalty. Digital distribution channels that leverage emerging technologies can track customer interaction and use the data to identify improvement opportunities up- or downstream. While some insurers have made significant improvements in their frontline underwriting and product design, most still rely on products that were designed for traditional distribution channels (brick and mortar) and require some level of post-sale verification of policy attributes. As a result, customer experience can quickly shift from digital to paper-intensive, snail mail and the requirements can vary based on the type of products purchased. Consumers may be required to send proof of discounts, photos or evidence of insurance that were unverified at the time of the quote.

In such cases, digital agencies like Gabi may be better equipped to quickly engage customers via text, chat or email and expedite requirements on behalf of their insurance partners while contributing to higher net promoter scores (NPS) and improved overall retention.

Ultimately, to create an optimal insurance shopping experience that’s more aligned with customer expectations, insurers need to invest in revamping their products and processes for digital distribution channels. That’s easier said than done, as bringing products to market takes multiple years to deploy and millions of dollars in investment. Large, established insurers may require additional investment in core technologies, rebranding and potentially cultural and ideological transformation, while new insurers such as Clearcover, Hippo and Lemonade are not encumbered by legacy systems.

Adopting the entire digital transformation ecosystem is difficult and costly for insurers and involves multiple departments within an organization, which often have competing objectives and operate in silos. Insurers may have much to gain from partnering with digital agencies as their distribution models provide growth opportunities and turnkey access to customers who are less likely to buy from brick and mortar agencies. Further, insurers can gain valuable insight into customer demographics and behavior that are unique to online shoppers and use this information in future product development and process improvement strategies.

What’s in a Name? Art of Insurtech Naming

What is it with insurtech brand names? Among the insurtechs that SMA is tracking (well over 1,000) are a wide range of names ranging from the clever to the practical to the bizarre. Having personal experience with naming, I can understand the challenges of finding something memorable, not already used, and lacking any negative connotations. There is always the option of functional naming; for example, Insuresoft clearly creates software solutions for the insurance industry.

When I was recently in a whimsical mood, I decided to do an exercise to categorize insurtech brand names by a number of topics or areas, including food, animals and human names. This is a sampling of what I found:

Food

One could make a whole meal out of insurtech names. The main course could be Oyster, focused on workers’ comp. Fruit sides might be Pear Insurance or Pineapple. There are plenty of drink options with H2O, Lemonade and Soda Insurance. And dessert – everyone’s favorite – is not lacking in options, with Cake or Pie, or maybe even Marshmallow.

See also: 3 Insurtech Firms Take a Star Turn  

Animals

Comic George Carlin used to wonder who took all the blue food. (Blueberries are not blue; they are purple!) But there are plenty of blue animals in insurtech, including Blue Owl, Blue Leopard and Blue Zebra. Then we have animals with descriptors like Bold Penguin, Pandadoc and PrecisionHawk. The insurtech menagerie also includes Hippo, Dolphin, Canary, Rhino and even a hybrid in CatDogFish. There is even a regular Zebra to go along with Blue Zebra.

Human Names

Why not anthropomorphize insurtechs? We do it with everything else. There is Bob – and if he gets lost there is FindBob. Abe, Albert, Frankie, Gabi and many others are named after people. Then there is Hi Marley, which does a nice job of creating something unique that also relates to the company’s solution – leveraging texting and messaging platforms to communicate with policyholders and claimants.

There is no question that many of these names are becoming known in the insurance industry, but there are pros and cons for using these types of names. One caution for those selecting names – think about search engine optimization (SEO) and how individuals will discover your site. With enough money, brand visibility can be built for any name. But in many cases funding is limited in the beginning stages, and the focus is more on building the solution and getting successful partnerships and projects underway. I have personally had great difficulty finding any information on some of these insurtechs – even just navigating to their websites – due to names that are so common that SEO is difficult.

See also: Insurtech’s Act 2: About to Start  

Another piece of advice (although I don’t claim to be a branding expert): Two-word names (separate or conjoined) offer more options for uniqueness than one-word names – Cake Insure, Young Alfred and TechCanary would be examples. Of course, brands are built, and companies succeed, based on the strength or their offerings, their innovation, their customer relationships/experience and many other factors. But I, for one, am glad that insurtechs are choosing names that are fun and interesting. So, what’s in a name? I guess it’s what you make of it.