Tag Archives: Ford

What GoogleCompare Shows on LeadGen

Steve Jobs was famous for saying; “A lot of times, people don’t know what they want until you show it to them.” He was most often referring to focus groups and “industry experts” as the last places he’d look for ideas on innovation and disruption.

I’ve often wondered what Jobs would have said if asked to reimagine insurance distribution in America. I think he might have obsessed about a customer-centric mindset, a fierce focus on trust and a single place for managing risk. Not what you typically see from those trying to disrupt LeadGen in insurance today.

Others Will Follow GoogleCompare Out

TheZebra.com, Insurify.com, QuoteWizard.com, GoogleCompare … the list appears to be endless these days – represent a group of “innovators” who didn’t think what the consumer might want from an insurance experience, and in turn are delivering a toxic insurance shopping experience clouded by opaque offers like providing an Expert Virtual Insurance Agent. What’s worse, many in the FinTech vertical – investors and media alike — are talking about these “innovations” without ever taking them for a test drive. Imagine the editor of Car & Driver simply publishing the latest hype for a new Ford Truck model as gospel without taking the vehicle for a spin.

So, why not take a spin. Ask for a quote from theZebra.com or QuoteWizard.com, AND give the company your actual email address and cell phone number. Then buckle up. Calls… emails… ad nauseam. And most of the outreach is not even from the LeadGen company you connected to. In fact, most of these LeadGen companies don’t actually sell insurance. They simply sell the customer and everything the customer has shared about themselves to others. How can that be?

Their Words – Not Ours

TheZebra.com home page promises the consumer “insurance in black and white.” Reminds me of Apple when it launched its iconic iPod with the simple phrase: “1,000 songs in your pocket.” Pretty snappy. But unlike Apple, which simply delivered on its promise, here’s what theZebra.com says it will actually do to the consumer and the personal information she provides. (As it happens, the privacy disclosure about buying insurance “in black and white” is in grey on the Zebra.com website. As my Dad would say, there are some things you just can’t make up. These are actual excepts from the company web site. The boldface is ours.

SHARING OF PERSONAL INFORMATION

The Zebra may rent, sell or share Personal Information or Location Based Information it collects about you to or with third parties. Personal Information and Location Based Information collected from you is commonly used to provide you with products and services and to comply with any requirements of law.

By submitting your e-mail address and/or phone number (as the case may be) via The Zebra or our properties, you authorize us to use that e-mail address and phone number to contact you periodically, via e-mail, SMS text message, and manually-dialed and/or auto-dialed telephone calls, concerning (i) your insurance-related or quote requests, (ii) any administrative issue regarding our services and/or (iii) information or offers that we feel may be of interest to you. We may also send e-mails to you periodically regarding updated quotes or offerings. You may opt out of receiving e-mails from us at any time by unsubscribing as set forth in the applicable e-mail. Additionally, by filling out information on The Zebra as part of your request for information about insurance policies and quotations, you authorize us to provide that information to various insurance companies, insurance agents and other related third parties that participate in our network. Some insurance companies or third parties may then provide your personal information to their insurance carriers, suppliers and other related vendors in order to generate price quotations and information relevant to insurance policies that you have requested. These third parties may use the contact information (including telephone number(s)) you have provided to contact you directly with quotations by means of telephone (manually or auto-dialed), fax, email and postal mail, even if you have registered your phone number(s) on local and/or national no-call lists. You further acknowledge and agree that each third-party that receives your quote request from this website or from our affiliates may confirm your information through the use of a consumer report, which may include among other things, your driving record and/or credit score. For purposes of faxing, it is understood that insurance companies or third parties have an established business relationship with each user of this website, if required to comply with the then current law.

We may also share certain personal information or location-based information with institutions providing possible product offerings to you based on the information you submit through the Website (e.g. financial institutions and/or insurance companies), and/or certain The Zebra vendors in order to allow them to use that information to obtain and provide us with additional information about you, and/or product offerings that might be of interest to you.

Decades of Trust Put at Risk in a Digital Instant

Iconic insurance brands, like AllState, Amica, Esurance and MetLife – are just a few of the insurance carriers featured inside these LeadGen sites. This isn’t complicated. As consumers, all of us are very wary of providing our personal information to anyone – always looking for assurances that the receiver of our personal information is someone we can trust. As insurance professionals, we will always require personal, non-public information to underwrite risk. It is critical as an industry that we preserve the public’s trust that we will respect their confidence and protect their data.

In my company, we do a lot of work with financial institutions, and even though they might complain about regulatory overreach, most bank CEOs are proud to state in BLACK AND WHITE: We will not share/sell your personal information with third parties. Look at the fight Apple and Google are prepared to wage to protect the personal data on someone’s cell phone – so focused about protecting the assumption of trusted privacy implicit in their brands.

When insurance carriers specifically, and our industry in general, support or, worse, encourage these LeadGen models, they put our brands, our hard-fought reputation of trust, and an emerging generation of customer-centric, omni-channel-licensed insurance advisers at risk. Insurance isn’t a commodity as long as underwriting is required, and regulators require massive balance sheets to stand at the ready to settle claims. Personal information, whether provided person to person or online, or via virtual driving analytics aggregation tools – it’s the customers’ data. And we as customers want to know who they are giving it to and how it’s being used.

If carriers don’t question this toxic experience called LeadGen, you can bet consumers and their advocacy groups will shortly assemble a collective voice to express their dissatisfaction to regulators – and the regulators will be quick to respond. I can hear Sen. Elizabeth Warren and the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau (CFPB) decrying the misrepresentations and mistreatment suffered by the consumer when they provide their personal information under the guise of a black-and-white shopping experience — only to learn their information has in fact been down-streamed to others again and again. Our entire industry will be painted with a very unflattering brush. Just as the outlandish behavior of certain mortgage origination companies drew harsh scrutiny for all lenders in the last decade, think of insurance commissioners and Congress taking aim at the “grey print” of these LeadGen models: the CFPB alleging potential unfair, deceptive or abusive acts and practices (UDAP) violations because of the problematic impact on the consumer.

Going Forward

For the carriers, the dilemma is real. Traditional brick and mortar local agencies as distribution platforms are going away. They have no large, scalable, addressable markets that can be engaged digitally. GEICO is relentlessly accumulating market share by going direct to consumers. It’s almost understandable that, given those constraints, some of America’s most powerful insurance brands are putting their brand equity at risk on these LeadGen platforms in an effort to remain visible, reaching for any option to remain viable.

An alternative solution is emerging. Insurance cCarriers and our industry must focus on imagining a new type of licensed agent with the tools that will let them provide a transformative insurance shopping experience for insureds – a lifetime of simple, comfortable, obsessively trustworthy insurance purchases and service. And we, as agents, from the Big I on down, have to imagine a new generation of insurance advisers and insurance agencies. Think of them as meta agents operating in meta agencies.

Can we imagine a new generation of agent that can instantly access all of the public and non-public information about a customer’s character and collateral, deliver it to a stable of insurance carriers that are prepared to underwrite that risk, in exactly the format they need it in, get instant quotes from the carriers that reflect the customer’s risk tolerance and assets to be insured, be available to provide any of the advisory insights the customer might want – all exactly at the moment the customer has an insurance need? A new generation of agents, operating in a new generation meta-agency — fulfilled in their work as risk managers and customer advocates, operating in a seamless, frictionless ecosystem in lifelong service to the customer. And all with an obsessive commitment to trust.

Can you hear Steve Jobs in his iconic black turtleneck on stage wondering the same out loud?

A New-Generation Agent and Agency

A new generation of agent and agency is emerging – empowered and excited to deliver insurance solutions to consumers, operating inside companies that have long and deep trusted brand equity with the consumer, an obsessive commitment to trust. And, having earned that trust, these agents have access to everything a carrier needs to know about the consumer’s character and collateral, eliminating the dreaded “insurance interview and application” or, worse, “the LeadGen hustle.”

This new agent never prospects, sells or steers a customer – the agent simply focuses on delivering a frictionless shopping, comparing, buying and post-purchase service experience tailored to each unique customer exactly at the instant the customer needs it — again, with an obsession for trust. We believe the role of an agent, with a completely reimagined operating environment, is more important and more valuable than ever before.

A new generation of agents and agency is emerging – reimagined to reflect what the customer actually wants, even though, in the iconic words of Steve Jobs, “They didn’t know it.”

industries

Outsiders Retreat From Insurance

Cargill, Monsanto, Wells Fargo and John Deere are officially out of the crop insurance business, according to a recent article from Bloomberg. Large companies like these expanded into different aspects of the agriculture industry over the past few years, and their debut in the insurance industry made quite an impact. With their newly acquired insurance operations, they were the market players to watch – and now we’re watching them leave the industry.

Behind this exodus is the matter of profit. Large companies, especially those that are publicly traded like Monsanto and John Deere, have a different perspective on risk and profit than the typical insurer.

Let’s take crop insurance profit and loss over the past couple years, which is driven by fluctuations in crop prices. As Bloomberg explained, “Bumper harvests have sent corn, the biggest U.S. crop, to less than half its 2012 peak, ratcheting down the premiums farmers pay to insure against loss. Other crops have also seen steep price declines.” At the same time, the broader insurance industry has been seeing lackluster results. The most recent numbers from the Congressional Research Service indicate an underwriting loss of $1.3 billion in 2012 and profit of $657 million in 2013. For insurers, although these are not welcome results, the reality is that there will be challenging years – and insurers are accustomed to anticipating them. They are in for the long haul. But large, diversified commercial companies such as Cargill, John Deere and Monsanto have a much harder time adjusting to these financial results.

So, were these big external players a collective blip on the map, or a real disruption? A pattern visible across many industries offers a possible answer. Large companies diversify around their current offerings, and, if the results are disappointing, they realize the expanded offerings are not core to their business. Google has been extremely successful in most of its diversification, but Google+, its social network offering, never became the powerhouse the compay had hoped would challenge Facebook. If these large companies are unsuccessful, they often leave the new industry.

This is not to downplay the role that new entrants have in the insurance ecosystem. They push our thinking and ways of doing business in directions that might otherwise have taken years for the industry to adopt. New players like Haven Life and Google are not attempting to be the same old insurer, only better. Their goal is to disrupt the business of insurance and to create something in a niche that the industry had not perceived. The disruption they cause can take many forms, from new solutions to new distribution channels. They can go after these markets without owning the entire process – and, in doing so, they create real changes in how the insurance industry has to operate.

Driverless cars will present similar challenges. Volvo and Ford have both mentioned the possibility of covering product liability insurance. How will this affect the insurance industry? Will automakers really cover the liability, or will they front it? Autonomous vehicles will change the insurance landscape by opening doors for these new thinkers. But will the insurance industry need to step in to present new insurance products that provide the necessary coverage? What role will insurers play in the new auto world?

Disrupters like Monsanto, Cargill and John Deere were not in the market for a long time, but they do have an impact. They invested in changing the claims process, and they applied data, analytics and automation in areas that were previously very manual – which causes us to rethink other processes. We can hope that their new ways of doing business opened some eyes in the industry. They did not change the game so much as establish that the game needs to be changed.

‘Gig Economy’ Comes to Claims Handling

Why is this taking so long?!

The challenge I hear echoed throughout the insurance industry is, “How do we speed up the claims process for customers?” Insurance companies often bear the brunt of frustrations from customers stressed out about delays. As we all know, processing claims takes time and patience to gather information, details, photographs and a myriad of other documentation. Getting the right information and accurate documentation takes even longer.

Based on the volume of claims, resources and personnel can become stretched thin quickly. Despite all the efforts within organizations, it’s not uncommon to see claims departments contorting themselves like Gumby to get it all done. Insurance claims are stressful, and relying on customers to reliably and quickly provide information is a challenge — even when it’s to their benefit.

The problem becomes exacerbated following natural disasters or claims in geographic locations where companies have little to no footprint and limited resources to document and gather the information needed. In those situations, companies have to reallocate and sometimes relocate resources, which is expensive, time-consuming and a logistical nightmare.

Saving time and improving data quality and accuracy are all key components to avoiding customer frustration and increasing customer satisfaction and loyalty.

Traditional Challenges Meet Disruptive Solutions

Recently, there’s been a lot of handwringing about the “sharing economy,” the “gig economy” and what it means for traditional lines of business and workers. Will the workplace as we know it change completely? As Tony Canas shared in his Insurance Thought Leadership piece, “What Will Be the Uber of Insurance?,” the gig economy is hardly the end of the world, and the insurance industry is probably due for some disruption.

What a number of traditional lines of business are beginning to discover is that the gig economy presents an opportunity to leverage the power of crowdsourcing to solve challenges, eliminate inefficiencies and even spark innovation within their organizations. Target and Instacart, GM and Lyft, are great examples of how large, traditional verticals are finding ways to integrate the gig economy into new products and services to attract and keep customers while increasing the bottom line.

Now going back to one of insurance’s greatest challenges — saving time and improving accuracy in the claims process, particularly when it comes to getting information such as photographs, records, police reports and inspections. These tasks sometimes feel like they can go on forever with a single claim as companies try to coordinate logistics with policyholders.

What if there was an Uber for insurers? A service that could dispatch an objective third party with a smartphone to quickly take pictures and gather exactly the information needed in the claims process almost immediately?

There is.

Disruption Gets Good for Insurance

Like Uber, WeGoLook is changing the way the gig economy is disrupting B2B by providing inspection and custom tasking services. Building on the strength of the gig economy and using the crowdsourcing model, WeGoLook has built a nationwide network of field agents that provides a nimbleness that is often buried alive in large enterprises.

Here’s how it works at one of the nation’s largest auto insurance companies, where WeGoLook is incorporated into the claims-handling process:

  • A claim handler places an order on a custom dashboard and chooses a service: (1) vehicle photos, (2) scene inspections, (3) salvage retrieval, (4) police record retrieval.
  • A WeGoLook representative calls the onsite contact/policyholder to verify address/item information and schedule an appointment.
  • The “Looker” arrives on-site and captures the data needed for the service/task.
  • Data is submitted via the mobile WeGoLook app and reviewed by internal staff at WGL for quality assurance.
  • The completed report is sent directly to the claim file.

Turning to the gig economy and its on-demand workforce is generating economic benefits and creating true efficiency. We’ve witnessed the process being replicated in companies both large and small and in a variety of categories.

Since starting the company in 2009, I’m continually inspired by the creativity of entrepreneurs and how they’ve found new and inspirational ways to apply crowdsourcing. From crowdfunding, ridesharing, coworking and delivery services to even “pet Airbnb,” the gig economy marketplace is homing in on specific consumer and business needs and delivering.

Autonomous Car Tech Reaches Mid-Market

As part of the 2016 edition of the Usage Based Insurance study, we analyzed the impact of autonomy on the insurance market. We forecast that 380 million semi-, highly or fully autonomous vehicles will be on the road by 2030.

This might sound like a lot, but then at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas we heard that new manufacturers are entering the race. Typically, we expect the luxury brands to foster the development of autonomous vehicles (AVs), with Mercedes, BMW and Tesla all topping the list of development activity. This time, however, it is the mid-market brands such as Nissan, Ford and GM that are making the announcements.

All three arrived at the show with news and partnerships up their sleeves as the competition grows ever more intense.

  • Nissan, in partnership with Renault, announced 10 vehicle models with autonomous capabilities on the road by 2020, with single-lane control from this year and rolling out multi-lane control intersections assistance from 2018 onward.
  • GM announced a $500 million investment in Uber rival Lyft, which GM says could lead to the development of a fleet of driverless cars, some available for hire, as well as a network of car rental stations. This announcement follows news regarding the development of GM’s self-driving version of the hybrid Chevrolet Volt.
  • Ford revealed an agreement with Amazon, aimed at linking cars with connected homes and the Internet of Things. Ford was also expected to announce a tie-up with Google, but that did not happen, possibly because of recent regulatory proposals limiting driverless vehicle testing in California. Instead, the car maker stated that it would triple the size of its Fusion Hybrid autonomous research fleet this year to 30. Ford will also integrate new solid-state lidar sensors that create real-time 3D models of the surrounding environment.

Although many autonomous functions, such as cruise and parking, are aimed at improving comfort, most of the development today is focused on safety and crash avoidance.

These capabilities will have a direct impact on the insurance industry a lot sooner than the driverless car. We analyzed and quantified that impact in the study to precisely estimate the share of accidents that could be avoided with the introduction of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS).

For example, we concluded that frontal collision avoidance and cruise systems could reduce losses by as much as 50% (depending on the level of sophistication).

ADAS functions could therefore lead to a reduction in accidents of between 30% and 40%, with AVs beginning to have a significant impact in mature markets from 2023 onward. In the most advanced countries, such as Germany, premiums will decrease by as much as 40% between 2020 and 2030.

With the end of the statistical actuarial model also approaching, insurers will need to be acutely aware of the car technology evolution speed. The car without accident will be on the road long before the car without driver.

The 2016 edition of the UBI Global Study was launched last month; It covers the impact of ADAS on insurance premiums in details and with a market forecast up to 2030. You can download the free abstract here.

Are You Ready for the IoT?

It’s no longer a question of whether insurers should prepare for the Internet of Things (IoT), but when and how to do so. Connected cars and homes are already here, with Ford’s CEO predicting driverless cars on the road by 2020 (the same year that Toyota plans to launch its driverless car).

But preparing for the IoT isn’t just about adapting existing business models or launching new services. It’s an opportunity to innovate and develop new business models, ways of working and ways to understand risk. It’s a chance to better connect with customers, to reinvent the claims process and to become an integral part of people’s lives.

Keys to success in the IoT

Accenture has identified five keys to success for insurers to capitalize on IoT opportunities. This week, I’ll look at two of them:

  • Choose the role you intend to play. Accenture’s Technology Vision for Insurance 2015 identified the need for insurers to become part of a digital ecosystem. Insurers must consider how they will collaborate with their ecosystem partners, and whether they will play a leading or supporting role. Either way, how will they administer the claims that result from the ecosystem and its partners? Further, insurers may need to tailor their approach for each market, business or region-and must bear in mind that, no matter what, they must offer a differentiated customer experience that delivers more than just claims administration.
  • Adopt a three-layer model for claims. The IoT demands a shift from one-to-many (one experience for many customers) to one-to-one (personalized service, delivered at scale), and a three-layer model can help insurers achieve this. As shown below, it’s based on a foundation of product, upon which is layered technology and then service. Together, the layers enable insurers to offer a customer experience characterized by convenience and seamlessness-which should be cornerstones of the overall experience, and especially the claims experience. For claims leaders, the three-layer model presents opportunities to leverage new forms of technology for a more nuanced understanding of risk and liability. For example, a car accident involving a connected car can provide precise data about speed, direction and driving conditions. Claims leaders should also consider how they can plug into the extended services that are part of the three-layer model. How can they work with lifestyle partners within an ecosystem to ensure that claims can be administered effectively and efficiently?

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That’s some food for thought in the holiday season. I wish you a safe and happy holiday season and look forward to wrapping up this blog series in the new year. I’ll be back in January to share three more keys to success for insurers in the IoT.